Do This Sell More https://davelorenzo.com Site Description Thu, 23 May 2019 07:00:59 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.1 Welcome to Do This Sell More! In this podcast, you will learn how to develop more and deeper relationships to make more money and still get home on time every night. Dave introduces himself and why you should listen to this show. You can change everything and take control of your future by focusing on relationship-based sells. When you learn how to build relationships, you learn how to generate revenue on demand. This podcast is for everyone. So come join us during your Thursday lunch and you too can Do This Sell More. Dave Lorenzo clean episodic Dave Lorenzo marjorie@turnkeypodcast.com marjorie@turnkeypodcast.com (Dave Lorenzo) Site Description Do This Sell More https://davelorenzo.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/DTSM_Show_Art.jpg https://davelorenzo.com Weekly Deb Gabor: A Branding Clinic for Your Self Brand | Do This Sell More Show 9 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/23/deb-gabor-a-branding-clinic-for-your-self-brand-do-this-sell-more-show-9/ Thu, 23 May 2019 07:00:59 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2688 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/23/deb-gabor-a-branding-clinic-for-your-self-brand-do-this-sell-more-show-9/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/23/deb-gabor-a-branding-clinic-for-your-self-brand-do-this-sell-more-show-9/feed/ 0 In this episode, Dave and Deb discuss: How your brand is your target and the 3 questions to ask to raise their profile. Building your brand and story around a specific avatar. How to get inside the head of your ideal client. Consistency and authenticity in brand success.   Key Takeaways and actionable tips: Don’t try and be everything to everyone. Focus everything on your best customer and build the brand for the best customer. Your ideal customer is a human being, not a business. Irrational loyalty is available to any company as long as you understand your customer’s hero story. Don’t get stuck in the middle of the pyramid, go to the top of the pyramid.   “Being a hero means becoming your ideal customer.” – Deb Gabor   Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course   About Deb Gabor   Deb Gabor is the founder of Sol Marketing, a consultancy that has led successful strategy engagements since 2003 for global brands like Dell, Microsoft, and NBCUniversal, and for numerous digital brands, including Allrecipes, Cheezburger, HomeAway, and many more.   A leading expert on brand disasters, she is the author of two best-selling books about branding: Irrational Loyalty and Branding Is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell out of Anything, and she has been featured in USA Today and other major publications. A displaced Midwesterner, Deb currently lives in Austin, Texas, but travels frequently to help her clients build bulletproof brands.    Connect with Deb Gabor   Website: DebGabor.com Book:     Irrational Loyalty: Building a Brand That Thrives in Turbulent Times & Branding Is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell Out of Anything     About Dave Lorenzo   David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.   Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.   Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.   Connect with Dave Lorenzo   Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo     Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast   Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues! In this episode, Dave and Deb discuss:

  • How your brand is your target and the 3 questions to ask to raise their profile.
  • Building your brand and story around a specific avatar.
  • How to get inside the head of your ideal client.
  • Consistency and authenticity in brand success.

    Key Takeaways and actionable tips:
  • Don’t try and be everything to everyone. Focus everything on your best customer and build the brand for the best customer.
  • Your ideal customer is a human being, not a business.
  • Irrational loyalty is available to any company as long as you understand your customer’s hero story.
  • Don’t get stuck in the middle of the pyramid, go to the top of the pyramid.


“Being a hero means becoming your ideal customer.” – Deb Gabor

Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course

About Deb Gabor

Deb Gabor is the founder of Sol Marketing, a consultancy that has led successful strategy engagements since 2003 for global brands like Dell, Microsoft, and NBCUniversal, and for numerous digital brands, including Allrecipes, Cheezburger, HomeAway, and many more.  

A leading expert on brand disasters, she is the author of two best-selling books about branding: Irrational Loyalty and Branding Is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell out of Anything, and she has been featured in USA Today and other major publications. A displaced Midwesterner, Deb currently lives in Austin, Texas, but travels frequently to help her clients build bulletproof brands. 

Connect with Deb Gabor

Website: DebGabor.com
Book:     Irrational Loyalty: Building a Brand That Thrives in Turbulent Times &
Branding Is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell Out of Anything


About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/
Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo
Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo
Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo


Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast

Spread the wealth – rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues!

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In this episode, Dave and Deb discuss: How your brand is your target and the 3 questions to ask to raise their profile. Building your brand and story around a specific avatar. How to get inside the head of your ideal client. In this episode, Dave and Deb discuss:<br /> <br /> How your brand is your target and the 3 questions to ask to raise their profile. <br /> Building your brand and story around a specific avatar. <br /> How to get inside the head of your ideal client. <br /> Consistency and authenticity in brand success. <br />   <br /> Key Takeaways and actionable tips:<br /> Don’t try and be everything to everyone. Focus everything on your best customer and build the brand for the best customer. <br /> Your ideal customer is a human being, not a business. <br /> Irrational loyalty is available to any company as long as you understand your customer’s hero story.<br /> Don’t get stuck in the middle of the pyramid, go to the top of the pyramid.<br /> <br />   <br /> “Being a hero means becoming your ideal customer.” – Deb Gabor <br />   <br /> Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course <br />   <br /> About Deb Gabor <br />   <br /> Deb Gabor is the founder of Sol Marketing, a consultancy that has led successful strategy engagements since 2003 for global brands like Dell, Microsoft, and NBCUniversal, and for numerous digital brands, including Allrecipes, Cheezburger, HomeAway, and many more.  <br /> <br /> A leading expert on brand disasters, she is the author of two best-selling books about branding: Irrational Loyalty and Branding Is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell out of Anything, and she has been featured in USA Today and other major publications. A displaced Midwesterner, Deb currently lives in Austin, Texas, but travels frequently to help her clients build bulletproof brands.  <br />   <br /> Connect with Deb Gabor <br />   <br /> Website: DebGabor.com <br /> Book:     Irrational Loyalty: Building a Brand That Thrives in Turbulent Times & <br /> Branding Is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell Out of Anything <br />   <br />   <br /> About Dave Lorenzo <br />   <br /> David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue. <br />   <br /> Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy. <br />   <br /> Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City. <br />   <br /> Connect with Dave Lorenzo <br />   <br /> Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ <br /> Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo <br /> Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo <br /> Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ <br /> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo <br /> Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo <br />   <br />   <br /> Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast <br />   <br /> Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues! Dave Lorenzo clean 29:50
Adam Hergenrother: Let Your Business Enable Your Lifestyle | Do This Sell More Show 8 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/16/adam-hergenrother-let-your-business-enable-your-lifestyle-do-this-sell-more-show-8/ Thu, 16 May 2019 16:00:10 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2674 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/16/adam-hergenrother-let-your-business-enable-your-lifestyle-do-this-sell-more-show-8/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/16/adam-hergenrother-let-your-business-enable-your-lifestyle-do-this-sell-more-show-8/feed/ 0 In this episode, Dave and Adam discuss: Maximizing each moment. The importance of meditation and Transcendental Meditation. Eradicating mediocrity. Increasing your mental fitness and training yourself to handle the problems that show up. Key Takeaways and actionable tips: Discipline equals freedom. Go to your appointments you have now and cut them in half.   Clarity equals speed. Every day you have the opportunity to create self-mastery – to overcome the voice inside your head that says “no”.   “The highest place any human being can be in a business or in their life is to raise up the moment that’s in front of them. If you do that, and you’re living with that attitude, I don’t care what level you’re playing at, if you do that with that intention, you are living the highest life that you can live right now.” – Adam Hergenrother   Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course   About Adam Hergenrother   Adam Hergenrother is the Founder & CEO of Adam Hergenrother Companies - which includes Keller Williams Vermont, Hergenrother Realty Group, BlackRock Construction, Adam Hergenrother Training, and Adam Hergenrother Foundation.   In less than ten years, Adam has built this rapidly growing company through his commitment to thinking big and never giving up. Fearless and purposeful; unconventional and systematic, Adam sets a seemingly impossible goal then quickly gets to work on closing the gap to achieve it: no limits, no regrets.   To kick start 2019, Adam Hergenrother Companies was been named one of the Best Places to Work in Vermont for the third year in a row. In 2018, Hergenrother Realty Group was named the #18 real estate team by REAL Trends, as advertised in The Wall Street Journal, and BlackRock Construction made the Inc. Magazine's Inc. 5000 list for the second time in two years.   Through Adam’s bold vision, Adam Hergenrother Companies is developing leaders and building businesses worldwide.    Connect with Adam Hergenrother   Website: AdamHergenrother.com Book: The Founder and the Force Multiplier     About Dave Lorenzo   David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.   Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.   Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.   Connect with Dave Lorenzo   Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo     Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast   Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues!   In this episode, Dave and Adam discuss:

  • Maximizing each moment.
  • The importance of meditation and Transcendental Meditation.
  • Eradicating mediocrity.
  • Increasing your mental fitness and training yourself to handle the problems that show up.


Key Takeaways and actionable tips:

  • Discipline equals freedom.
  • Go to your appointments you have now and cut them in half.  
  • Clarity equals speed.
  • Every day you have the opportunity to create self-mastery – to overcome the voice inside your head that says “no”.


“The highest place any human being can be in a business or in their life is to raise up the moment that’s in front of them. If you do that, and you’re living with that attitude, I don’t care what level you’re playing at, if you do that with that intention, you are living the highest life that you can live right now.” – Adam Hergenrother

Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course

About Adam Hergenrother

Adam Hergenrother is the Founder & CEO of Adam Hergenrother Companies – which includes Keller Williams Vermont, Hergenrother Realty Group, BlackRock Construction, Adam Hergenrother Training, and Adam Hergenrother Foundation.  

In less than ten years, Adam has built this rapidly growing company through his commitment to thinking big and never giving up. Fearless and purposeful; unconventional and systematic, Adam sets a seemingly impossible goal then quickly gets to work on closing the gap to achieve it: no limits, no regrets.  

To kick start 2019, Adam Hergenrother Companies was been named one of the Best Places to Work in Vermont for the third year in a row. In 2018, Hergenrother Realty Group was named the #18 real estate team by REAL Trends, as advertised in The Wall Street Journal, and BlackRock Construction made the Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 5000 list for the second time in two years.  

Through Adam’s bold vision, Adam Hergenrother Companies is developing leaders and building businesses worldwide. 

Connect with Adam Hergenrother

Website: AdamHergenrother.com
Book: The Founder and the Force Multiplier


About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/
Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo
Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo
Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo


Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast

Spread the wealth – rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues!

 

]]>
In this episode, Dave and Adam discuss: Maximizing each moment. The importance of meditation and Transcendental Meditation. Eradicating mediocrity. Increasing your mental fitness and training yourself to handle the problems that show up... In this episode, Dave and Adam discuss:<br /> <br /> Maximizing each moment. <br /> The importance of meditation and Transcendental Meditation. <br /> Eradicating mediocrity.<br /> Increasing your mental fitness and training yourself to handle the problems that show up.<br /> <br /> <br /> Key Takeaways and actionable tips:<br /> <br /> Discipline equals freedom. <br /> Go to your appointments you have now and cut them in half.  <br /> Clarity equals speed.<br /> Every day you have the opportunity to create self-mastery – to overcome the voice inside your head that says “no”.<br /> <br />   <br /> “The highest place any human being can be in a business or in their life is to raise up the moment that’s in front of them. If you do that, and you’re living with that attitude, I don’t care what level you’re playing at, if you do that with that intention, you are living the highest life that you can live right now.” – Adam Hergenrother <br />   <br /> Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course <br />   <br /> About Adam Hergenrother <br />   <br /> Adam Hergenrother is the Founder & CEO of Adam Hergenrother Companies - which includes Keller Williams Vermont, Hergenrother Realty Group, BlackRock Construction, Adam Hergenrother Training, and Adam Hergenrother Foundation.  <br /> <br /> In less than ten years, Adam has built this rapidly growing company through his commitment to thinking big and never giving up. Fearless and purposeful; unconventional and systematic, Adam sets a seemingly impossible goal then quickly gets to work on closing the gap to achieve it: no limits, no regrets.  <br /> <br /> To kick start 2019, Adam Hergenrother Companies was been named one of the Best Places to Work in Vermont for the third year in a row. In 2018, Hergenrother Realty Group was named the #18 real estate team by REAL Trends, as advertised in The Wall Street Journal, and BlackRock Construction made the Inc. Magazine's Inc. 5000 list for the second time in two years.  <br /> <br /> Through Adam’s bold vision, Adam Hergenrother Companies is developing leaders and building businesses worldwide.  <br />   <br /> Connect with Adam Hergenrother <br />   <br /> Website: AdamHergenrother.com <br /> Book: The Founder and the Force Multiplier <br />   <br />   <br /> About Dave Lorenzo <br />   <br /> David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue. <br />   <br /> Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy. <br />   <br /> Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City. <br />   <br /> Connect with Dave Lorenzo <br />   <br /> Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ <br /> Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo <br /> Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo <br /> Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ <br /> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo <br /> Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo <br />   <br />   <br /> Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast<br />   <br /> Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues! <br /> <br />   Dave Lorenzo clean 26:33
Michele Barard: Discovering your Superpower | Do This Sell More Show 7 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/09/michele-barard-discovering-your-superpower-do-this-sell-more-show-7/ Thu, 09 May 2019 07:05:22 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2665 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/09/michele-barard-discovering-your-superpower-do-this-sell-more-show-7/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/09/michele-barard-discovering-your-superpower-do-this-sell-more-show-7/feed/ 0 In this episode, Dave and Michele discuss: Michele’s mission to help 350 women become entrepreneurs by starting or expanding their side hustles. Success stories in her career. Converting your passion into your full time. Maintaining productivity in a work-from-home environment.   Key Takeaways and actionable tips: What do you do well that other people see value in? Utilize your natural network whenever possible. If you’re writing a book, start building your audience on the front end.  Don’t multitask – there’s no such thing. Either you’re doing one thing really well, or a bunch of things not as well.   “There’s always something you know and you can do.” – Michele Barard   Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course   About Michele Barard   Michele Barard, a graduate of Agnes Scott College, has experience as a software trainer, graphic designer, editor, writer, and a business coach. She founded Urban Book Editor in 2012 to help writers of all genres create their best work. Ms. Barard also hosts a podcast, Somewhere in the Middle with Michele Barard, which features business leaders and authors who share their journeys to inspire others. She currently resides in the Los Angeles metro area where she writes, edits, and provides coaching to her clients. Learn more about Michele Barard at www.MicheleBarard.com or www.UrbanBookEditor.com.    Connect with Michele Barard   Website: MicheleBarard.com & UrbanBookEditor.com Podcast: Somewhere in the Middle with Michele Barard     About Dave Lorenzo   David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.   Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.   Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.   Connect with Dave Lorenzo   Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo     Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast   Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues!   In this episode, Dave and Michele discuss:

  • Michele’s mission to help 350 women become entrepreneurs by starting or expanding their side hustles.
  • Success stories in her career.
  • Converting your passion into your full time.
  • Maintaining productivity in a work-from-home environment.


Key Takeaways and actionable tips:

  • What do you do well that other people see value in?
  • Utilize your natural network whenever possible.
  • If you’re writing a book, start building your audience on the front end. 
  • Don’t multitask – there’s no such thing. Either you’re doing one thing really well, or a bunch of things not as well.


“There’s always something you know and you can do.” – Michele Barard

Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course

About Michele Barard

Michele Barard, a graduate of Agnes Scott College, has experience as a software trainer, graphic designer, editor, writer, and a business coach. She founded Urban Book Editor in 2012 to help writers of all genres create their best work. Ms. Barard also hosts a podcast, Somewhere in the Middle with Michele Barard, which features business leaders and authors who share their journeys to inspire others. She currently resides in the Los Angeles metro area where she writes, edits, and provides coaching to her clients. Learn more about Michele Barard at www.MicheleBarard.com or www.UrbanBookEditor.com. 

Connect with Michele Barard

Website: MicheleBarard.com & UrbanBookEditor.com
Podcast: Somewhere in the Middle with Michele Barard


About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/
Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo
Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo
Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo


Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast

Spread the wealth – rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues!

 

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In this episode, Dave and Michele discuss: Michele’s mission to help 350 women become entrepreneurs by starting or expanding their side hustles. Success stories in her career. Converting your passion into your full time. In this episode, Dave and Michele discuss:<br /> <br /> Michele’s mission to help 350 women become entrepreneurs by starting or expanding their side hustles. <br /> Success stories in her career. <br /> Converting your passion into your full time.<br /> Maintaining productivity in a work-from-home environment.<br /> <br />   <br /> Key Takeaways and actionable tips:<br /> <br /> What do you do well that other people see value in? <br /> Utilize your natural network whenever possible. <br /> If you’re writing a book, start building your audience on the front end.  <br /> Don’t multitask – there’s no such thing. Either you’re doing one thing really well, or a bunch of things not as well.<br /> <br />   <br /> “There’s always something you know and you can do.” – Michele Barard <br />   <br /> Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course <br />   <br /> About Michele Barard <br />   <br /> Michele Barard, a graduate of Agnes Scott College, has experience as a software trainer, graphic designer, editor, writer, and a business coach. She founded Urban Book Editor in 2012 to help writers of all genres create their best work. Ms. Barard also hosts a podcast, Somewhere in the Middle with Michele Barard, which features business leaders and authors who share their journeys to inspire others. She currently resides in the Los Angeles metro area where she writes, edits, and provides coaching to her clients. Learn more about Michele Barard at www.MicheleBarard.com or www.UrbanBookEditor.com.  <br />   <br /> Connect with Michele Barard <br />   <br /> Website: MicheleBarard.com & UrbanBookEditor.com <br /> Podcast: Somewhere in the Middle with Michele Barard <br />   <br />   <br /> About Dave Lorenzo <br />   <br /> David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue. <br />   <br /> Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy. <br />   <br /> Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City. <br />   <br /> Connect with Dave Lorenzo <br />   <br /> Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ <br /> Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo <br /> Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo <br /> Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ <br /> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo <br /> Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo <br />   <br />   <br /> Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast<br />   <br /> Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues! <br /> <br />   Dave Lorenzo clean 32:31
Steven Sashen: Creating and Connecting with a Purpose | Do This Sell More Show 6 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/02/steven-sashen/ Thu, 02 May 2019 16:00:31 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2624 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/02/steven-sashen/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/05/02/steven-sashen/feed/ 0 In this episode, Dave and Steven discuss: The Shark Tank Experience. Why Xero Shoe is a movement. Building a community. The reality of the guarantee.   Key Takeaways and actionable tips: Create your product to support the purpose. Build your marketing based on the customer lifecycle. A guarantee isn’t dangerous if you have a good product. Just be a nice person. Don’t let the anonymity of the internet change the way you interact with humans as a human being.   “People like relating to people, not to things, not to an amorphous corporate blob.”– Steven Sashen   Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course   About Steven Sashen   Steven Sashen is a serial entrepreneur who has never had a job, a former professional stand up comic and award-winning screenwriter, and a competitive sprinter -- one of the fastest men over 55 in the country (maybe the fastest 55+ Jew in the world!). He and his wife, Lena Phoenix, co-founded the footwear company Xero Shoes, creating "a MOVEMENT movement" which has helped hundreds of thousands of people Live Life Feet First with happy, healthy, strong feet in addictively comfortable footwear. Steven and Lena also appeared on Shark Tank, where they turned down a $400,000 offer from Kevin O'Leary.    Connect with Steven Sashen   Website: XeroShoes.com     About Dave Lorenzo   David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.   Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.   Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.   Connect with Dave Lorenzo   Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo     Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast   Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues!   In this episode, Dave and Steven discuss:

  • The Shark Tank Experience.
  • Why Xero Shoe is a movement.
  • Building a community.
  • The reality of the guarantee.

Key Takeaways and actionable tips:

  • Create your product to support the purpose.
  • Build your marketing based on the customer lifecycle.
  • A guarantee isn’t dangerous if you have a good product.
  • Just be a nice person. Don’t let the anonymity of the internet change the way you interact with humans as a human being.


“People like relating to people, not to things, not to an amorphous corporate blob.”– Steven Sashen

Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course

About Steven Sashen

Steven Sashen is a serial entrepreneur who has never had a job, a former professional stand up comic and award-winning screenwriter, and a competitive sprinter — one of the fastest men over 55 in the country (maybe the fastest 55+ Jew in the world!). He and his wife, Lena Phoenix, co-founded the footwear company Xero Shoes, creating “a MOVEMENT movement” which has helped hundreds of thousands of people Live Life Feet First with happy, healthy, strong feet in addictively comfortable footwear. Steven and Lena also appeared on Shark Tank, where they turned down a $400,000 offer from Kevin O’Leary. 

Connect with Steven Sashen

Website: XeroShoes.com


About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/
Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo
Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo
Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo


Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast

Spread the wealth – rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues!

 

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In this episode, Dave and Steven discuss: The Shark Tank Experience. Why Xero Shoe is a movement. Building a community. The reality of the guarantee.   Key Takeaways and actionable tips: - In this episode, Dave and Steven discuss:<br /> <br /> The Shark Tank Experience. <br /> Why Xero Shoe is a movement. <br /> Building a community. <br /> The reality of the guarantee. <br />   <br /> <br /> <br /> Key Takeaways and actionable tips:<br /> <br /> Create your product to support the purpose. <br /> Build your marketing based on the customer lifecycle. <br /> A guarantee isn’t dangerous if you have a good product. <br /> Just be a nice person. Don’t let the anonymity of the internet change the way you interact with humans as a human being.<br /> <br />   <br /> “People like relating to people, not to things, not to an amorphous corporate blob.”– Steven Sashen <br />   <br /> Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course <br />   <br /> About Steven Sashen <br />   <br /> Steven Sashen is a serial entrepreneur who has never had a job, a former professional stand up comic and award-winning screenwriter, and a competitive sprinter -- one of the fastest men over 55 in the country (maybe the fastest 55+ Jew in the world!). He and his wife, Lena Phoenix, co-founded the footwear company Xero Shoes, creating "a MOVEMENT movement" which has helped hundreds of thousands of people Live Life Feet First with happy, healthy, strong feet in addictively comfortable footwear. Steven and Lena also appeared on Shark Tank, where they turned down a $400,000 offer from Kevin O'Leary.  <br />   <br /> Connect with Steven Sashen <br />   <br /> Website: XeroShoes.com <br />   <br />   <br /> About Dave Lorenzo <br />   <br /> David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue. <br />   <br /> Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy. <br />   <br /> Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City. <br />   <br /> Connect with Dave Lorenzo <br />   <br /> Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ <br /> Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo <br /> Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo <br /> Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ <br /> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo <br /> Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo <br />   <br />   <br /> Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast<br />   <br /> Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues! <br /> <br />   Dave Lorenzo clean 30:10
Barry Conchie: Sales and Leadership | Do This Sell More Show 5 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/25/barry-conchie-sales-and-leadership-do-this-sell-more-show-5/ Thu, 25 Apr 2019 11:00:40 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2587 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/25/barry-conchie-sales-and-leadership-do-this-sell-more-show-5/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/25/barry-conchie-sales-and-leadership-do-this-sell-more-show-5/feed/ 0 In this episode, Dave and Barry discuss: Lessons of leadership. Mindset shift before change is made. Building complementary partnerships. Variations on the sales ladder within a company.   Key Takeaways and actionable tips: Don’t operate on the pretense of success, when evidence says it won’t. We cannot assess ourselves without bias, take an objective assessment to know your strengths and weaknesses. Being a brilliant performer in the sales role, is not a guarantee you will be a great sales leader.  Numbers-game sellers and relationship sellers are two different personalities of people.   “Stop thinking you’re going to solve a problem that no amount of effort so far has lead to a solution – get out of it!” – Barry Conchie   Sales and Leadership; An Interview with Barry Conchie Here is the transcript of the interview with Barry. Dave Lorenzo:        This is the Do This Sell More show. I'm Dave Lorenzo and you are in for a special treat today. This is going to seem like a conversation with an old friend because in fact it is. Today we have with us Barry Conchie. Now I know Barry Conchie before he was ... From before he was an absolute superstar in the field of executive coaching, leadership selection and professional development for those at the C level and when I say C level, I mean CEO, Chief Operating Officer, Chief Financial Officer. If you're in a leadership position in a company, this is the guy you need to listen to. He's the guy you need to invite in when you're having real challenging issues and when you're thinking about making serious moves and you don't know whether you're doing the right thing and I know senior executives are hesitant to admit that they don't know when they're doing the right thing, but Barry Conchie is the guy to call. Now, I know Barry, from our days of working together at Gallup. He was one of my most valuable partners, but right now he owns his own company. He's the Founder and President of Conchie Associates. He previously headed the Gallup organizations Global Leadership Research and Development Business and he was there until 2013 as a senior scientist. He was born and educated in the UK. That's why he sounds much more sophisticated than I do. He's got 35 years of experience in the areas of psychometric assessment, executive coaching, top level succession planning, individual and team optimization, organizational effectiveness and strategic alignment and if he sees you eating in an unhealthy manner, he will even help you with your diet. Barry is consultant and partnered with a leading global organizations. I mean, if you think about it, Barry has either worked with them, he's working with them right now or he will be working with them shortly. His current research is in the science of decision making, heuristics and cognitive bias. If you don't know what that is, you need to stay with us because he's going to describe all of it for you in language that's easy to understand and in my mind, that's Barry's true gift. He takes complicated issues, complicated decisions, and he helps you break them down so that you feel good with the decisions you're making. Barry is an author, he's written a couple of books. He appears in magazines, he writes for magazines all the time. He's the coauthor of the Wall Street Journal, bestselling strengths based leadership, which was a bookie he coauthored a few years ago. He currently lives in Boulder. Like he runs all kinds of like mountain marathon type stuff and he hangs from rocks, he will tell us all about that. Please join me in welcoming Barry Conchie to the show. Barry, welcome and thank you for being our, I think you're our fifth ever guest. Barry Conchie:     It's a pleasure, Dave. Good to see you again. Dave Lorenzo:       It's great to be with you. Now, let's start with what I couldn't remember. Tell me, are you still ... You're still like rock climbing without ropes and stuff? In this episode, Dave and Barry discuss:

  • Lessons of leadership.
  • Mindset shift before change is made.
  • Building complementary partnerships.
  • Variations on the sales ladder within a company.


Key Takeaways and actionable tips:

  • Don’t operate on the pretense of success, when evidence says it won’t.
  • We cannot assess ourselves without bias, take an objective assessment to know your strengths and weaknesses.
  • Being a brilliant performer in the sales role, is not a guarantee you will be a great sales leader. 
  • Numbers-game sellers and relationship sellers are two different personalities of people.


“Stop thinking you’re going to solve a problem that no amount of effort so far has lead to a solution – get out of it!” – Barry Conchie

 

Sales and Leadership; An Interview with Barry Conchie

Here is the transcript of the interview with Barry.

Dave Lorenzo:        This is the Do This Sell More show. I’m Dave Lorenzo and you are in for a special treat today. This is going to seem like a conversation with an old friend because in fact it is. Today we have with us Barry Conchie. Now I know Barry Conchie before he was … From before he was an absolute superstar in the field of executive coaching, leadership selection and professional development for those at the C level and when I say C level, I mean CEO, Chief Operating Officer, Chief Financial Officer. If you’re in a leadership position in a company, this is the guy you need to listen to. He’s the guy you need to invite in when you’re having real challenging issues and when you’re thinking about making serious moves and you don’t know whether you’re doing the right thing and I know senior executives are hesitant to admit that they don’t know when they’re doing the right thing, but Barry Conchie is the guy to call.

Now, I know Barry, from our days of working together at Gallup. He was one of my most valuable partners, but right now he owns his own company. He’s the Founder and President of Conchie Associates. He previously headed the Gallup organizations Global Leadership Research and Development Business and he was there until 2013 as a senior scientist. He was born and educated in the UK. That’s why he sounds much more sophisticated than I do. He’s got 35 years of experience in the areas of psychometric assessment, executive coaching, top level succession planning, individual and team optimization, organizational effectiveness and strategic alignment and if he sees you eating in an unhealthy manner, he will even help you with your diet.

Barry is consultant and partnered with a leading global organizations. I mean, if you think about it, Barry has either worked with them, he’s working with them right now or he will be working with them shortly. His current research is in the science of decision making, heuristics and cognitive bias. If you don’t know what that is, you need to stay with us because he’s going to describe all of it for you in language that’s easy to understand and in my mind, that’s Barry’s true gift. He takes complicated issues, complicated decisions, and he helps you break them down so that you feel good with the decisions you’re making. Barry is an author, he’s written a couple of books. He appears in magazines, he writes for magazines all the time. He’s the coauthor of the Wall Street Journal, bestselling strengths based leadership, which was a bookie he coauthored a few years ago. He currently lives in Boulder. Like he runs all kinds of like mountain marathon type stuff and he hangs from rocks, he will tell us all about that.

Please join me in welcoming Barry Conchie to the show. Barry, welcome and thank you for being our, I think you’re our fifth ever guest.

Barry Conchie:     It’s a pleasure, Dave. Good to see you again.

Dave Lorenzo:       It’s great to be with you. Now, let’s start with what I couldn’t remember. Tell me, are you still … You’re still like rock climbing without ropes and stuff? Are you still doing that?

Barry Conchie:      We’re still doing crazy things. Mountain biking, rock climbing, doing mountain running. Basically anything in the mountains, Dave. You take me to a beach, I don’t know what to do. But put me in a mountain, I can keep active for days on end.

Dave Lorenzo:        Well that’s perfect. Tell me a little bit about some of the lessons you took away from 2018, particularly there’s one that I love because I think most of us people who work in sales, particularly sales leaders, are guilty of this all the time. So your lessons from leadership and by the way, you can find these lessons of leadership on Barry’s website, which is conchieassociates.com. C.O.N.C.H.I.Eassociates.com, all together. His lessons of leadership are on there and the one that drew my eye immediately, not just because it was first, but because it’s the one I think most people are guilty of, is about doubling down in defending bad decisions. So, all right, Barry, we’re all guilty of this, right? Sales leaders especially are guilty of this. What do we do instead of doubling down and defending a bad decision once we realize it’s a bad decision and I think that’s a huge part of it, right? Once we realize it’s a bad decision, what do we do?

Barry Conchie:         Well, there’s something called sunk cost fallacy, Dave, where people believe that unless you put so much investment time or resources into a problem or an issue you’re working on, even if it’s not working, you would rather put even more in and try to make it work than just write that cost off and it’s an aspect of psychological functioning. We don’t like to think, we fail. So we have a project, we’ve already lost a ton of money on it, and we think maybe just this last investment will make the difference. Maybe it’s just this last effort that somehow I have discovered so far that if I just pushed through and worked really hard just to this next few weeks, maybe it will solve it. It never does. So the sunk cost fallacy suggests that literally is a fallacy to keep sinking costs into a failing entity.

First challenge is to realize it, second challenge is write it off psychologically. Stop thinking that you’re going to solve a problem that no amount of efforts so far has led to a solution. Get out of it.

Dave Lorenzo:      At what point do you … How do you … Well, let’s start here. How do you … What’s the easiest way to admit to yourself that this is something that’s not going to work and I need to move on? Is it a question of viewing it as a learning experience versus a failure? I mean, what have you found in counseling executives who make decisions that don’t work out and they’re just doubling down and they’re bought into them. What is the mindset shift that needs to be made in order for them to move on?

Barry Conchie:     Well, the toughest one is a public one. So if you’ve signed up for something and you pursuing something and it’s a very, very public issue and you are failing, that’s very, very difficult for people to step away from. I can think of a couple of examples. I mean, we’ve spent plenty of time working with companies who’ve acquired other companies, they don’t always work out.

Now, to what extent do you just write it off? To what extent do you say, I can’t succeed with this and it’s difficult when the issue is so visible. If it’s visible, we almost feel a sense of shame and embarrassment or failure. Actually, I think if you think about it very carefully, I think the reverse is true. If you can turn around and admit that a public commitment you made is now no longer viable for these reasons, I think our integrity goes from that, through this sky, I mean everybody looks at that and thinks, “Whoa, somebody’s admitted a mistake in public”. So I actually think paradoxically it would be better if we just did that and to continue operating on the pretense that they’re going to succeed when all evidence suggests that they won’t.

Dave Lorenzo:      Yeah, and there’s a human aspect to it too. You appear to be more human when you admit that you’ve made a mistake. There’s a … It’s almost like it’s a kin to empathy. People can really then connect with you on a human level.

Barry Conchie:       They can and we’ve all been in that situation. We’ve all had these insurmountable problems. We’ve all thrown everything that we had, the issue that we’re dealing with and yet we’ve not succeeded, step away. I mean, just admit that maybe you’re not the first to solve this. Maybe there’s somebody else who can, but there’s no shame in stepping away and saying, “You know, that was not a problem I could solve. That was not an issue I could deal with. I’m going to admit to that and actually there are a whole ton of things where I can be more successful and more effective. I’m going to switch over to those”. That would be a much more mature thing to do. Your credibility increases as well.

Dave Lorenzo:         So tell me about hiring and surrounding yourself with people who are complimentary to your strengths, right? We work in a world where it’s still more common for people to focus on fixing the things that they’re not great at. Do leaders … Are leaders as threatened by the prospect of bringing in people who are strong in areas where they’re weak as say a salesperson would be?

Barry Conchie:         Well, I wish it was as sophisticated as that, Dave. I wish people when they’re going through the hiring process actually have a good line of sight to those issues. The truth is they don’t. So if we were to look at building complimentary partnerships, so given who I am as a leader, I’ve got different deficiencies in known areas, I’m going to select people for those deficiencies. I wish it was as clinical as that, but it isn’t. A lot of the time I spent time working with leaders who were operating under a delusion where they don’t believe they have deficiencies in critical areas. So that’s one problem. Then the second problem is there’s no amount of expertise that they have that will enable them to elicit those deficiencies in an applicant during the job interview.

So there are two problems, Dave, the self reflection problem.

Dave Lorenzo:      Yeah, that’s really-

Barry Conchie:      But honestly, I can’t identify in the other person as well. You put those two things together, you’ve got a dog’s breakfast. It’s not going to look good.

Dave Lorenzo:        So what’s the … So the first step then is to do a personal inventory and really be introspective and look at yourself. Is that right?

Barry Conchie:        Yeah, and I would say the first inventory needs to be an objective assessment. It can’t be, “I’m just going to sit and reflect on myself for the next 20 minutes and put a list of things down that I think about myself”. I mean, we’re going to say several levels of wonderfulness at the top of that list and then at the bottom we’re going to say things like, “Well, I work too hard”. Things that are not really weaknesses at all, they’re just obvious statements of self aggrandizement and we don’t want that. So I think the best thing to do is to put yourself through a very robust objective assessment that is designed specifically to identify the characteristics in you that will cause you to succeed or failure for the level that you’re at and there are tools out there. We built tools like that where we talk to leaders and assess leaders precisely for that purpose. Then that gives you at least a clinical basis for thinking then through the kinds of people you need to surround yourself with.

But I would quickly say you’re the least equipped to figure those things out on your own with, again, not having some kind of objectivity to what it is that you would put a person through who was trying to get a job in your company.

Dave Lorenzo:     Isn’t it amazing how most often the people who advance in the company advance with a total deficiency of self awareness. I’ve met more sales professionals in organizations who have suffered, who have a greater sense of self awareness than CEOs. Why do you think that is? Why is it that people who seem to rise up through the ranks of leadership are often less self aware? Is it that they’d never been cast in a role that’s ideal for them? What causes that?

Barry Conchie:     I’m not so sure it’s a blanket lack of self awareness. So I think that there are certainly individuals who are not as self aware as others. I think leaders are typically more self aware because they’ve had a ton of feedback as they’ve risen through the ranks. They’ve either gone through 360 processes or they’ve had all the kind of coaching or guidance to clearly address issues whether or not they’re strong. So I think that’s probably a better way of stating that issue. There are a few people who are completely unaware of what their primary strengths and weaknesses are, but they tend to fail. They tend to get weeded out at some point.

The issue to me is not that they lack self awareness, but they lack a clinical precision to describe it in an accurate way. So we tend to use very broad generalized buckets and a leader might turn around and say, “Well, you know, I’m just not very good with numbers”. But then when you really dig into it, it really isn’t the number element at all. It’s they are just not detail oriented and are not prepared to put the time into really understanding the details in order to elicit the information that they need from whatever they’re looking at. It’s not that they’re not a numbers person, it’s that they’ve got attention deficit disorder and are rather interested in other things than the details that are in front of them right now. So it’s the lack of clarity and precision around aspects of their functioning that is the issue rather than completely lacking in self awareness.

Dave Lorenzo:       That’s interesting. Now I understand. So it’s harder for them to describe what they’re feeling rather than not knowing what they’re feeling. I run into this concept of all the time of the greatest salesperson in the organization being promoted into being a leader of that organization and you and I both know from the work that we’ve done in the past that most often that leads to misery for just about everyone involved. It leads to misery for the person who’s in the job, it leads to misery for the company and it leads to misery for the people that they’re managing, that they’re leading. What is, and this is going to be a great softball question for you. What is the proper way to structure an organization like a sales organization where there’s so much unique ability in the actual doing of the role or the actual managing of the role everyday? What’s the way to structure that?

Barry Conchie:      Well, the simple thing on sales is the performance is the qualifier. So if you’re looking at advancing your career as a sales rep and you want to move into sales management, the truth of the matter is some people can make that transition, but others can’t, but performance is the qualifier. So here’s a way to think about it. Let’s just say you’ve got the potential to be a brilliant sales leader, but your performance is horrible. There’s no way you’re going to get that opportunity and the reason for that is you don’t have credibility, but the PPS cost could be leading.

So you haven’t met the minimum requirement. The minimum requirement is you hit your quality, you hit your goal, you do it consistently, it’s visible, people can see that, you are believable. Now we’re going to figure out can you lead sales people? That’s a different question. The fact that you’re a brilliant performer in the sales role makes no guarantee or prediction that you’ll be able to lead other salespeople. So the first issue then is look at performance as the qualifier. The second element is that just because you’re performing very well does not give you the abilities to lead other salespeople. We need to figure that out. We’ve got to ask different questions of you and the way I think about it is this, it’s a bit like a pyramid. If everybody who’s performing well in your organization is populating the base of that pyramid, a relatively small number of people who will populate in the base of that pyramid through performance, they’re going to advance to the higher levels of that pyramid.

We’re going to see people falling away and it’s not because they’re not performing, it’s not because they’re not trying hard, it’s that they’re in a better position selling than they are managing people who sell. Now, the biggest problem, Dave, as you know, we’re not sure to ego in a sell [inaudible 00:15:48] really good one. If we’ve got a good sales force, we’ve got a lot of ego in that room. It’s very, very difficult for a sales rep with that kind of an ego not to believe that a sales management position isn’t for them. It’s so, so hard because they’ve been so successful all of their lives and I have to sit down with these real top performing reps and say, “Do you want to spend the next 10 years in misery or do you want to have a lot of fun and sell even more?” Then put that way, it makes a choice relatively easy. But absent of that kind of pressure, some of them feel with their ego and the aspirations to be bigger and better and do more, that they should move into a management position where they might be a complete disaster.

Dave Lorenzo:     Isn’t it also incumbent upon the organization to a structure, a recognition and reward program so that there’s almost two tracks? So in the sales organization, you have the leadership track for people who have the talent to manage, motivate and inspire others. But then you also have the top performer track where those folks are recognized as the engine that makes the company go and I find … No, I want to see if you’re an agreement on this because I find that often times organizations are hesitant to create that second track because of two things really. Number one, they don’t want to feed that ego even more. They’re afraid of what would happen if they feed that ego even more and the second thing that they’re overly concerned about is they’re overly concerned about hurting the people, threatening the people who are in those leadership positions and they’ve just completely lost focus of what will actually drive the outcomes. I’m interested in your thoughts on that.

Barry Conchie:     We solve that problem by screening reps at the time that they’re hired for management capability. So imagine you want a rep job in a company, you want to sell in a company. So you apply for a job there, we take you through one of our online scoring tools. That tools also reading whether you’ve got potential to be a manager at some point in the future, it gives you an early indication. So to your point, if you create a management track, let’s base that management tracking on credible evidence and that credible evidence needs to be assessment based, not just you thinking this person might be a good manager because I’m not prepared to trust your judgment.

So what we then do is we have a category of rep now who has a job to do, they got the [inaudible 00:18:22] to hit, they got customers to win over, products to sell, solutions to sell. They have a successful career doing that. But at the same time we’re actually exposing them to management education, manager development. We might put them on broader cross functional teams which might stretch them out a little bit because we saw in their assessment, an indication that they could be a sales manager one day and we’re going to grow that, we’re going to test it, we’re going to see it and that to me is a very sensible approach. The other way you structure a sales force is to create different ladders to different destinations, but not taking the person out with that role.

So can we create a super rep? One of the things that I’ve been particularly interested in is looking at the relationship between certain talents for selling and geographic span. So, if somebody is a successful sales rep, those put then in a bigger geography with bigger opportunity increase sale likelihood of succeeding or failing. That’s an answerable question, we shouldn’t even test that. So I think organizations look at that. Another one is to say, okay, we’re actually going to give you bigger accounts to go after, but we’re going to layer underneath you as sales support person, somebody who can come along and who can do some of the followup work with some of your customers because you’re out there pursuing greenfield opportunities and we can create a ladder that looks like that.

So one ladder might be, “I’m going to give you a massive territories” and other ladder might be, “I’m going to give you the biggest customers”. Another ladder might be, we’ve got something called national accounts where these organizations cut across many, many, many, many geographies and therefore we need to sell this in at the system level or the national level where we’re not having reps nibbling away to each customer in each geography. We’re trying to put together an overarching deal around a structure that enables us to sell at the entity level. Those to me are the kinds of solutions I would like to see organizations pursue and then sales reps can almost self select or we can help them select and then they can get value climbing each of those different ladders.

Dave Lorenzo:      That’s great. I love those thoughts. Those are great things for us to think about. I focus on relationship based sales. So I help companies with large, long sales cycles. I help companies who market to the affluent, I help people who are in situations where they’re not going to … There’s not going to be a one call solution. I am a huge advocate that everyone must have a relationship based sales approach in their tool kit, because you never know who’s going to refer you to your next big client. Regardless of whether you’re writing … You’re a pharmaceutical sales rep trying to get doctors to write more prescriptions or you’re a payment systems person who’s trying to switch credit card processing and get people to switch their credit card processing company or if you’re out there working for Gulfstream selling jets or you’re a trust and estates attorney trying to get a family office work where you do a state planning for people who are worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

My contention is, and I want to hear what you have to say about this, my contention is those two sales approaches, the cold call, what I call hit and run sales approach versus a relationship sales approach. I think it’s very difficult to find those talents. That of innate ability in one person because they’re two different types of people who excel at each of those. What do you think about that given the research that you’ve done into behavior and people over the years?

Barry Conchie:     Well, for one person to have both those capabilities would be unique and I would say, why go for a needle in a haystack? It makes no sense to me. So the folks who are really, really good at cold calling, breaking down doors and operating with to a degree relational insensitivity, because they’re getting pushback all the time, they’d been told no, nine times out of ten. I mean, to be able to succeed that way requires a certain type of talent and characteristic and we’ve built assessments for that kind of sell falls where they really are selling. They’re stacking it up and they’re selling it cheap and they’re selling in volume and they’re showing up to different places and knocking on doors and they’re getting no, no, no, no, no, maybe and then they just go after the ‘maybes’ and they work on math. They say, “Okay, for every 20 calls I’m going to make one sale. So they set their days with 20 calls knowing they’re going to close one of them and they’re going to get, no, no, no, no, no, as they goes through the day.

That’s a special talent, but it’s not a relational approach and if you want to drive value in sales, you’ve got to have fantastic relationships. So let’s get back to the cold call again. Is that cold call of going back and back and back again and again and again and again and maintaining that relationship? No, they’re doing the sale, they’re moving on all the places to go sell and that’s how they want it. They’ve sold it, you ask them three months time whether they sold it, they can’t even remember because [crosstalk 00:23:50]

Now, if I sit down with you with a relationship and say, “Well Dave, you know, I just don’t remember who the heck you are”, then that’s going to be a problem if we’re trying to build a proper relationship with an organization. So the way I characterize it is, you can stack a mile and selling cheap and sell in high volume and it’s a numbers game. Or you can build a relationship over time and that relationship will drive long term value because you’re actually not selling products in that relationship, you’re selling yourself. But when you sell yourself, there’s an ethical component to how that looks and feels for a client. It makes your word matter. It means that you’ve got to be accurate around what you sell and you’re going to be very precise in the description of value. Now, sure, you’re going to say, “Doing business with me is way better than the guy down the street and here’s why”, but then you use that as the basis for building a fantastic relationship with that buyer over time to the point where you can’t tell them any different from your friends.

I mean, these are people that you had called, you invite them to your kind of kid’s graduation or whatever it might be. In other words, you develop fantastic relationships with them as friends. You just happen to do business with.

Dave Lorenzo:     That’s perfect. I love that. That’s a great commentary. One of the things that sticks with me from our time at Gallup was looking at the folks who had and we were able to, and you do it now with your company. You can identify somebody who has empathy versus someone who doesn’t have empathy and that to me is one of the key elements that differentiates the hit and run salesperson from the relationship based salesperson.

The hit and run salesperson can learn what to say to mimic empathy, but it never ever appears genuine and the clients know it, they can sense it and they can feel it. So when you get into the types of products or services were caring and long term thinking and just the emotional aspect of a relationship driven process, the hit and run salesperson, the one who’s really, really good at it, doesn’t have it. They just don’t have it and that’s your way of describing it is, I think it’s spot on. You almost described it now as being diametrically opposed. You to take no that much, you have to be wired in a way that relationships are just not important to you because like me, if I heard no all day long I’d be a basket case. I wouldn’t be able to get out of bed. I couldn’t do it.

Barry Conchie:     Well, look at it this way, Dave, and I think asking this question of sales reps is really important as you think about that, their orientation around that work and things. But ask a sales rep who’s breaking down doors every day and selling whatever products [inaudible 00:27:00] from them, can a salesperson sell anything and they’ll say yes and they’ll say yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. The reason is that’s what they’ve been doing their entire life. They’ve been bouncing around from company to company, all doing the same kind of thing. I’m putting my foot through a door, breaking in through some of these office to talk to, whatever it is. But I’m selling, selling, selling, selling, selling. But you got to a relational sales rep, a rep who’s building a long term relationship with a customer based on mutual value around what it is the two of them are trying to achieve together and you say to them, “Do you think your sales reconcile anything?” They’ll say, “Absolutely not” and they even turn around and they say, “There are some things I will never sell” and that’s because what they’re selling is so much a part of who they are as a person, but they could never imagine themselves selling that product.

Now sometimes it’s brand specific, but I actually think it’s more around sector of different kinds of work. So for example, could you imagine yourself in a sales rep in Philip Morris, it elicits a very different response from a relational salesperson than it is from somebody who says, “Hey, that might be a way of earning a lot of money”. It’s that kind of questioning that I wish reps would carry out for themselves to prescreen themselves, but just involve opportunities they might face.

Dave Lorenzo:      All right, so we’ve had a great conversation with Barry Conchie, the foremost leadership expert on executive performance. If you want to find out more about Barry, I want you to go to his website. It’s conchieassociates, C.O.N.C.H.I.E associates, all together. So C.O.N.C.H.I.E.A.S.S.O.C.I.A.T.E.S.COM. Barry, where can we get more Barry Conchie? Is there a place to go besides the website? What can we … What should we look for? What have you got coming up that we need to know about?

Barry Conchie:      Well, you can find me on Linkedin. You can connect to me there. I post quite frequently there on different issues of the day with respect to leadership. We got a book coming out in about a year’s time which is going to be looking at critical issues around leadership. We will be planning a series of articles that will be preceding that. So yeah, connect to me on Linkedin. Look at what’s going on, I’ll keep people up to date and you’ll find out more about how we think about the kinds of works that can help people really achieve top performance.

Dave Lorenzo:         Brilliant. So what I’m going to do folks is I’m going to put Barry’s Linkedin, I put his website, a link in the show notes, which you can find on YouTube, on iTunes, on Google, wherever you get your podcasts. I’ll also put his link to his Linkedin profile so you can click on that. You can also find all of this information on my website on under the podcast tab under the show with Barry Conchie and I have to tell you, I could talk to Barry for another three or four hours. I have talked to him for three or four hours straight, but much to his delight we have a limited amount of time today.

Barry, I want to thank you for joining us. It was an absolute pleasure and you will be back in future episodes to talk specifically, as long as you’re willing about sales leadership because we have a great challenge in this country. We have … There are a lot of salespeople, but there are very few people who can inspire and motivate and help sales people succeed and that’s really what it comes down to when it comes down to being a sales leader. So as an expert on leadership, we’re going to lean on you for more advice on sales leadership in the future.

Barry Conchie:     I look forward to it, thanks very much Dave.

Dave Lorenzo:  All right folks, that’ll do it for another episode of the Do This Sell More show. We’ll see you right back here again next week and until next week, I hope you do this and sell more.


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About Barry Conchie

Barry Conchie, NYT and WSJ bestselling author  

A renowned leadership consultant, Barry Conchie is sought after by CEOs around the world to assist in aligning business and talent strategies that drive performance. An expert in executive assessment, team diagnostics, strategy, decision-making and succession planning, he brings objective measurement and insight to these important leadership areas.  

Conchie is the coauthor of Strengths Based Leadership as well as a series of journal and magazine articles and white papers. The book encompasses research with more than 1 million work teams, in-depth interviews with more than 20,000 leaders, and further interviews with more than 10,000 followers around the world. Published in January 2009, the book immediately became a New York Times, Wall Street Journal and BusinessWeek bestseller. It is now one of the bestselling leadership books of all time and has released the leadership potential of thousands of individuals around the world.  

Conchie was cited by Leadership Insight magazine as one of the world’s top leadership thinkers and practitioners. He consults with a select group of CEO’s and Boards of some of the leading companies and brands where his direct advice and objective guidance has created or accelerated growth that has impacted thousands of employees, leaders and shareholders and millions of customers. He is a frequently requested speaker at conferences and events where he brings his unique data insights to a global audience. He is currently researching decision science and heuristics – the impact of psychological bias on human behavior and performance – where his work brings him into contact with leading contributors in the fields of behavioral economics, neuroscience, social networking and evolutionary psychology.  

Conchie honed his own leadership skills as a highly successful public sector leader in the United Kingdom before joining The Gallup Organization in London. In 2002, he brought his extensive global experience to Gallup’s Washington, D.C., headquarters, where he led Gallup’s global executive leadership research and development consulting. He recently founded Conchie Associates in Boulder, CO  

When Conchie isn’t at work he is always thinking about work. He spends free time engaged in technical rock climbing, mountaineering and ultra-mountain marathon running (where he has competed in international events). He and his wife, Nicola, live in Boulder, Colorado. 

Connect with Barry Conchie

Website: ConchieAssociates.com
LinkedIn: Barry Conchie


About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/
Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo
Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo
Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo


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In this episode, Dave and Barry discuss: Lessons of leadership. Mindset shift before change is made. Building complementary partnerships. Variations on the sales ladder within a company. -   Key Takeaways and actionable tips: - In this episode, Dave and Barry discuss:<br /> <br /> Lessons of leadership. <br /> Mindset shift before change is made. <br /> Building complementary partnerships.<br /> Variations on the sales ladder within a company.<br /> <br />   <br /> Key Takeaways and actionable tips:<br /> <br /> Don’t operate on the pretense of success, when evidence says it won’t. <br /> We cannot assess ourselves without bias, take an objective assessment to know your strengths and weaknesses. <br /> Being a brilliant performer in the sales role, is not a guarantee you will be a great sales leader.  <br /> Numbers-game sellers and relationship sellers are two different personalities of people.<br /> <br />   <br /> “Stop thinking you’re going to solve a problem that no amount of effort so far has lead to a solution – get out of it!” – Barry Conchie <br /> <br />  <br /> Sales and Leadership; An Interview with Barry Conchie<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript of the interview with Barry.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:        This is the Do This Sell More show. I'm Dave Lorenzo and you are in for a special treat today. This is going to seem like a conversation with an old friend because in fact it is. Today we have with us Barry Conchie. Now I know Barry Conchie before he was ... From before he was an absolute superstar in the field of executive coaching, leadership selection and professional development for those at the C level and when I say C level, I mean CEO, Chief Operating Officer, Chief Financial Officer. If you're in a leadership position in a company, this is the guy you need to listen to. He's the guy you need to invite in when you're having real challenging issues and when you're thinking about making serious moves and you don't know whether you're doing the right thing and I know senior executives are hesitant to admit that they don't know when they're doing the right thing, but Barry Conchie is the guy to call.<br /> <br /> Now, I know Barry, from our days of working together at Gallup. He was one of my most valuable partners, but right now he owns his own company. He's the Founder and President of Conchie Associates. He previously headed the Gallup organizations Global Leadership Research and Development Business and he was there until 2013 as a senior scientist. He was born and educated in the UK. That's why he sounds much more sophisticated than I do. He's got 35 years of experience in the areas of psychometric assessment, executive coaching, top level succession planning, individual and team optimization, organizational effectiveness and strategic alignment and if he sees you eating in an unhealthy manner, he will even help you with your diet.<br /> <br /> Barry is consultant and partnered with a leading global organizations. I mean, if you think about it, Barry has either worked with them, he's working with them right now or he will be working with them shortly. His current research is in the science of decision making, heuristics and cognitive bias. If you don't know what that is, you need to stay with us because he's going to describe all of it for you in language that's easy to understand and in my mind, that's Barry's true gift. He takes complicated issues, complicated decisions, and he helps you break them down so that you feel good with the decisions you're making. Barry is an author, he's written a couple of books. He appears in magazines, he writes for magazines all the time. He's the coauthor of the Wall Street Journal, bestselling strengths based leadership, which was a bookie he coauthored a few years ago. He currently lives in Boulder. Like he runs all kinds of like mountain marathon type stuff and he hangs from rocks, he will tell us all about that.<br /> <br /> Please join me in welcoming Barry Conchie to the show. Barry, welcome and thank you for being our, I think you're our fifth ever guest.<br /> <br /> Barry Conchie:     It's a pleasure, Dave. Good to see you again. Dave Lorenzo clean 32:32
Jeremy Leveille: Maximize Your Inbound Sales | Do This Sell More Show 4 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/18/jeremy-leveille-maximize-your-inbound-sales-do-this-sell-more-show-4/ Thu, 18 Apr 2019 07:05:48 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2538 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/18/jeremy-leveille-maximize-your-inbound-sales-do-this-sell-more-show-4/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/18/jeremy-leveille-maximize-your-inbound-sales-do-this-sell-more-show-4/feed/ 0 Inbound sales is a significant focus for every business. On this episode of the Do This Sell More show, we focus on the best ways to grow inbound sales. In this episode, Dave and Jeremy discuss: What clicked for Jeremy in sales. Jeremy’s approach – both in social settings and in sales settings. How your mindset shifts when you just go in without a fear of rejection. The connection between comedy and sales. Key Takeaways and actionable tips: Interact with strangers in public, and your sales skills will become better. A brushoff doesn’t mean they aren’t interested, it means they aren’t paying attention, so reframe your question and get their attention. Be strategic in your prospecting – not everyone will connect to the same pitch. Be human, not a robot, in your interactions with others. “Be comfortable and confident with who you are and being able to walk up to anybody, any stranger, and just be able to have that charisma and confidence to strike up a conversation with anybody.”– Jeremy Leveille How to Maximize Inbound Sales   Here is the Transcript for How to Maximize Inbound Sales Dave Lorenzo:               This is the Do This Sell More show. I'm your host Dave Lorenzo, and we have a great show for you today. I have today for you the guy who's going to teach you how to maximize your inbound sales. That's right; this is someone who's doing this every single day, and folks, that's what makes us different here at Do This Sell More. We bring you the people who can make this happen for you, because they're doing it themselves. Dave Lorenzo:               There's no academic theory, there's no people out there who wrote a book, and are just trying to hump a book, and get you to do techniques that they've heard about but never done. We've got actual experts using the tools that they're going to discuss with us today. Dave Lorenzo:               So, let me tell you a little bit about Jeremy Leveille. Jeremy is an absolute expert on inbound sales, and he's been in sales for 10 years with experience ranging from direct sales to channel. He really has found a niche in business development, and has exceeded his quota for nine months in a row, including one month with 69 meetings set. That's more than two meetings everyday. Even if he's working on weekends, that's absolutely crazy. Dave Lorenzo:               This has resulted in him being voted sales development rep of the year at the Sales Development Conference by Tenbound, and this was in 2019. Jeremy's with LeadIQ, which is a fantastic tool for you to use to get contact information for people so that you know you're going to get through to them when you want to reach them. But without further adieu, I want to welcome Jeremy to the show. Dave Lorenzo:               Jeremy, thanks for joining us today. Jeremy L.:                     Thanks so much, Dave. It's a pleasure to be here. Dave Lorenzo:               Now, Jeremy, tell me a little bit. Just give me your background real quick. Tell me what drove you to get into sales and why you've stayed in it for so long. What gets you fired up about sales every day? Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. I actually have a unique story as somebody that has overcome some challenges, and it's like this underdog story; somebody that was down, and then was able to rise up from the ashes. In the beginning, I wasn't very good at sales. I sucked at sales in the beginning when I wasn't as mature, and I didn't have the sales skills, or business acumen, or people skills that I do now. Jeremy L.:                     I've been fired from three or four different sales jobs early in my career. Early, mid 20s. But then I didn't give up. I stuck with it. I had some resilience and just along the way I was able to learn a lot of things and improve my people skills, and my confidence, and my business acumen, and my sales skills to the point where I started to get better at it, Inbound sales is a significant focus for every business. On this episode of the Do This Sell More show, we focus on the best ways to grow inbound sales.

In this episode, Dave and Jeremy discuss:

  • What clicked for Jeremy in sales.
  • Jeremy’s approach – both in social settings and in sales settings.
  • How your mindset shifts when you just go in without a fear of rejection.
  • The connection between comedy and sales.

Key Takeaways and actionable tips:

  • Interact with strangers in public, and your sales skills will become better.
  • A brushoff doesn’t mean they aren’t interested, it means they aren’t paying attention, so reframe your question and get their attention.
  • Be strategic in your prospecting – not everyone will connect to the same pitch.
  • Be human, not a robot, in your interactions with others.

“Be comfortable and confident with who you are and being able to walk up to anybody, any stranger, and just be able to have that charisma and confidence to strike up a conversation with anybody.”– Jeremy Leveille

How to Maximize Inbound Sales

 

Here is the Transcript for How to Maximize Inbound Sales

Dave Lorenzo:               This is the Do This Sell More show. I’m your host Dave Lorenzo, and we have a great show for you today. I have today for you the guy who’s going to teach you how to maximize your inbound sales. That’s right; this is someone who’s doing this every single day, and folks, that’s what makes us different here at Do This Sell More. We bring you the people who can make this happen for you, because they’re doing it themselves.

Dave Lorenzo:               There’s no academic theory, there’s no people out there who wrote a book, and are just trying to hump a book, and get you to do techniques that they’ve heard about but never done. We’ve got actual experts using the tools that they’re going to discuss with us today.

Dave Lorenzo:               So, let me tell you a little bit about Jeremy Leveille. Jeremy is an absolute expert on inbound sales, and he’s been in sales for 10 years with experience ranging from direct sales to channel. He really has found a niche in business development, and has exceeded his quota for nine months in a row, including one month with 69 meetings set. That’s more than two meetings everyday. Even if he’s working on weekends, that’s absolutely crazy.

Dave Lorenzo:               This has resulted in him being voted sales development rep of the year at the Sales Development Conference by Tenbound, and this was in 2019. Jeremy’s with LeadIQ, which is a fantastic tool for you to use to get contact information for people so that you know you’re going to get through to them when you want to reach them. But without further adieu, I want to welcome Jeremy to the show.

Dave Lorenzo:               Jeremy, thanks for joining us today.

Jeremy L.:                     Thanks so much, Dave. It’s a pleasure to be here.

Dave Lorenzo:               Now, Jeremy, tell me a little bit. Just give me your background real quick. Tell me what drove you to get into sales and why you’ve stayed in it for so long. What gets you fired up about sales every day?

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. I actually have a unique story as somebody that has overcome some challenges, and it’s like this underdog story; somebody that was down, and then was able to rise up from the ashes. In the beginning, I wasn’t very good at sales. I sucked at sales in the beginning when I wasn’t as mature, and I didn’t have the sales skills, or business acumen, or people skills that I do now.

Jeremy L.:                     I’ve been fired from three or four different sales jobs early in my career. Early, mid 20s. But then I didn’t give up. I stuck with it. I had some resilience and just along the way I was able to learn a lot of things and improve my people skills, and my confidence, and my business acumen, and my sales skills to the point where I started to get better at it, and then as I started to get better at it, I kept sinking my teeth in and learning, and immersing myself in whatever product I was selling.

Jeremy L.:                     And in the sales and marketing B2B world, networking with other people that I could learn from, and reading books to the point where I started to get even better.

Dave Lorenzo:               Jeremy, what was the one thing that clicked for you, that lead you to believe you could actually do this? None of us are born being great at sales, and I think we all have a story similar to yours, where we sucked along the way and then, at some point, something clicked. What was the one thing that clicked for you?

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. There was a few things, but one in particular, it’s kind of a unique story and different than what most people probably would expect me to say, but I wasn’t very … my people skills weren’t very good, and so I wasn’t very confident talking to strangers, which, if you’re in sales, prospecting, that is … you’re dead in the water, right there.

Jeremy L.:                     But what I was, at the time, I was living in a city, and I had some friends that … I started to go out more. I started to go out and interact with strangers, and all of a sudden, the more I went out with friends, and go to restaurants, and comedy clubs, and bars, and then I became more comfortable actually talking to strangers in public, and having actual, human to human conversations, and then my friends were … then I became known as the opener.

Jeremy L.:                     I was able to open conversations with anybody, including women, and get their phone numbers and stuff like that. It was like this flip side, from, I used to be the awkward guy in high school and college that couldn’t talk to girls, and couldn’t talk to strangers and stuff, but just from coming out of my shell, that was one of the things that really turned things around for me.

Jeremy L.:                     And that coincided with me being better on the phone and making cold calls, so that was one of the things that kick started some of the confidence for me.

Dave Lorenzo:               That’s terrific. Now, tell me about your approach, and I want to talk about three different things. I want to talk about your approach when it comes to social settings, and I want you to tell me what’s similar in your approach to a sales prospect, and then I want to talk a little bit about comedy. Let’s talk about your approach in social settings and how that’s similar to your approach when you sell.

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. I think it’s just being comfortable and justs being comfortable and confident with who you are, and being able to walk up to anybody, any stranger, and just being able to have that charisma and confidence to strike up a conversation with anybody, and you have to just go for it, you know? And that’s the same thing with cold calling. You can’t be afraid of what the prospect might say on the other end of the phone, or you can’t be afraid of getting hung up on.

Jeremy L.:                     You have to just go for it, and it’s just a mindset, and in the beginning, you know, I was scared and I was awkward and stuff, but the more I did it, then my mindset shifted, and I just started to not really care. You have to have this mindset of no fear of rejection, and not caring what that person is going to say if they reject you, and once you have that you don’t give a you-know-what mentality, and there’s no fear of rejection, then all of a sudden the confidence is there and you’re able to strike up a conversation with anybody and make that connection with the other person.

Dave Lorenzo:               Yeah. I love that, and you know, one of the things I tell people all the time, specifically I tell my clients, is you’re not going to remember the 10 or 15 people who rejected you, but you are going to remember every single deal you close. Every person who gives you the time of day, who says, “Hey, you’ve got something valuable. I want to talk to you a little bit more about that.” You’re going to remember that and you’re not going to remember specific rejections, and, Jeremy, I don’t know about you, but I’ve never gotten into a fistfight over trying to sell somebody anything.

Dave Lorenzo:               People tell me, look, they don’t want it, and I move on, and I go to the next place, but nobody’s ever hurt me because I tried to be their friend, or because I tried to sell ’em something.

Jeremy L.:                     Exactly. What’s the worst that can happen, you know? The worst that can happen is you get hung up on. And then I’ve had it happen before where I get hung up on, and then two weeks later, that person emails me back and is actually now interested in meeting. They don’t even remember that happening, so-

Dave Lorenzo:               Exactly. That’s so true. That is 100% true. Sometimes people will call you back and they’ll say, “Hey, listen. I just got this email from you and it sounds like you’ve got something really great for me.” You talked to that exact person two weeks ago and they don’t remember talking to you.

Jeremy L.:                     Exactly. Or, you know, just try somebody else at the company if that person hung up on you, or rejects. You got to have thick skin.

Dave Lorenzo:               My theory about rejection in sales is most of the time, the rejection in sales, and tell me if you agree with this or if you want to expand on it, most of the time the rejection in sales is not about you. It’s about that person and where they are in their business, where they are in their life. They may not need what you have to offer, or they may not see the value in what you have to offer.

Dave Lorenzo:               It’s not about you. It’s about them and their situation, so move on, and maybe they’ll come back to you at a different point

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah, exactly. And also, I think we’re psychologically programmed, as humans, to … there’s that knee jerk reaction. You get a cold call or a cold email, and a lot of times, people, if it’s just … you’re catching them off guard, they don’t know who you are, they weren’t expecting this call, they initially say, “Oh, I’m in a meeting.” Or, “I’m not interesting.” You know, if they’re in a … nine times out of 10, if they say they’re in a meeting, they’re not in a meeting.

Jeremy L.:                     They’re just trying to get you off the phone because it’s a cold call, or they just say, “Oh, we’re all set.” Or, “We’re not interested.” They’re just brush offs. You know? It’s just because we’re programmed to do that, so in those cases, you just have to kind of reframe the conversation and just say something like, “Oh, I totally get that you’re not interested. Is there any way I could’ve approached this conversation a little bit differently that would’ve had a different result?”

Jeremy L.:                     If you can just kind of reframe the conversation, and then they’re going to take a step back and be like, “Oh, wait a minute. Who are you with again? What do you guys do?” And now you actually have their attention, but that first time, when you first got ’em on the phone, you didn’t have their attention at all. They weren’t listening to your pitch. They’re just trying to get you off the phone.

Jeremy L.:                     You have to be able to just kind of move past that, get past that initial brush off, and reframe the conversation, and you might actually get somewhere.

Dave Lorenzo:               Yeah, and the reframing is so important, ’cause when you reach out to somebody, and this is true if it’s a referral, or if you’re cold calling someone, the initial shock of you being on the phone, and you talking to them, regardless of what your opening line is, their natural reaction is going to be, “Well, who is this? I’m not interested. I didn’t ask for this call.”

Dave Lorenzo:               What I like to do is, whatever they say when you call ’em in that situation, I just say, “Oh, yeah. Me too.” “Oh, Jeremy. I’m in a meeting, I can’t talk right now.” “Well, you know what, Dave? I’m in a meeting too, and I thought this was so important I stepped out of my meeting to give you a call.” And they go, “What? You did what? Who are you again?” I mean, it completely stops them in their tracks.

Dave Lorenzo:               “Oh, you know what? I’m super busy, and I know what it is you guys do, and I really don’t have time for this.” “You know what? I didn’t have time for this either, but I thought it was so important I wanted to reach out to you and give you a call.” And they’re going to say, “Well, wait a minute. How did this happen?” What’s your opening line? When you call someone, or when you walk up to someone and you want to start a relationship with them, what’s your opening line? What do you do to get the conversation started?

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah, if it’s a cold call, the line that I’ve been using a lot lately is, “Hey, Dave. I realize I’m calling out of the blue here and you’re not expecting this call. Is it cool if I explain the reason for my call in less than 30 seconds?” You know?

Dave Lorenzo:               Oh, that’s good. And what do people usually say?

Jeremy L.:                     Nine times out of 10, they say, “Sure, go for it.” You know? They’re like, “Oh, yeah. Yeah, sure. Go for it.” And now you have their attention, and I’m not going to ask for a few minutes, or, “I know I’m calling out of the blue. Can I have 10 minutes or your time, or five minutes?” You know, I’m calling out of the blue. It’s a call that’s not on their calendar, and I’m calling a busy executive person.

Jeremy L.:                     I know that they don’t have very much time, but they did answer, so I probably am going to be able to get at least 30 seconds or a minute to at least get somewhere. You know, be able to generate their interest or pique their curiosity enough to be able to schedule an appointment from there. If it’s in person, I take a little bit different approach. I mean, you know, I just try to figure out, “Okay, where am I? Is it a networking event?” Then I try to reframe it, and instead of just saying, “Oh, my company does … ” you know, when they ask you, at, like, an event, “What do you do?”

Jeremy L.:                     Instead of me just giving a generic elevator pitch, “My company does blah blah blah blah,” and then they just tune out and they’re like, “Yeah, whatever. Sales pitch.” I try to frame it like, “Here’s the problem that we solve.” You know? “People come to us because.” You know, “People come to us because they’re experiencing problems with blah blah blah blah.” And then, “We’re able to help them so that now they’re able to blah blah blah.”

Jeremy L.:                     You know, you show the before and after, and then if any of those problems resonate with that particular person, which, hopefully they do. I mean, depending on what type of event you’re at, that you’re meeting them at, hopefully it’s similar people, you know, that you actually have some key prospects that are there, hopefully those things will resonate with them.

Dave Lorenzo:               Now, when you’re calling to book an appointment with someone, your entire objective is just to get them interested enough to agree to an appointment. Right?

Jeremy L.:                     Yep.

Dave Lorenzo:               How do you go about doing that? How do you show them enough value in 30 seconds so that they’re going to give you … ? What are you looking for, 30 minutes or their time or 20 minutes of their time in an appointment?

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. 15, 20 minutes probably.

Dave Lorenzo:               Okay, so give me your bitch. What do you say to get them interested in LeadIQ so that they want to find out more?

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah, I mean, I’m very strategic and targeted with prospecting, so it’s going to look different if I’m selling to a VP of sales for a company that sells an ERP system to law firms in the enterprise space, and most of their customers are in the west coast or something, versus somebody who manages an inside sales team of only five people, and they sell a security software to chief information security officers, for example.

Jeremy L.:                     You know, it’s always going to kind of look a little bit differently, but in general I might say something like, “Hey, problem that we solve is that a lot of companies are finding that their sales reps are spending too much time manually trying to find data on their prospects, and build prospecting lists, and figure out who they should talk to, and try to guess their emails and phone numbers, and get that data into their CRM. It’s on average taking sales reps six hours a week. If we can cut that out and, for you guys, so your reps can spend more time actually selling, would that help you guys out?”

Dave Lorenzo:               The value you’re providing is you’re saving them six hours a week, and that’s time they can be more productive, and if they generally get one more appointment an hour, or close one more deal an hour, that’s six more deals you’re bringing them a week. Really.

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. Exactly.

Dave Lorenzo:               Right? So, that’s fantastic. So, Jeremy’s on the phone here looking to help me get six more deals a week. Why wouldn’t I give him 15 minutes? That makes sense to me.

Jeremy L.:                     Yep. There you go.

Dave Lorenzo:               Alright. Now, let’s talk about how comedy has helped you in your role of sales, in your role as a sales professional, somebody who delivers value to people. Talk to me about what you’re doing with comedy and tell me about how comedy has helped you be more successful in doing what you do.

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. I think it all comes down to just being a real person. You know? Being a human and not being a robot, and especially when you’re prospecting. You know, and even if you’re taking the deal from … it’s pipelined, and you’re trying to close it, or if you’re managing accounts, you have to be a person and not a robot. Let your personality out. I mean, if you’re not funny, then don’t try to be funny.

Jeremy L.:                     But I have done some standup comedy, and that’s helped me out a lot where I’ll do videos. I’ll send prospecting videos to prospects, and I use a software called Vidyard to do that where you’re able to really quickly record a video on your computer and it embeds it in the email, so what most people that use software tools like this for, these video emails that you can send people, they just turn the camera on and they just pitch their product.

Jeremy L.:                     You know they literally will just say the same thing that they would have said in the text email. It’s just a canned product pitch, but what I do is I’m like, “Oh, I’m going to use this opportunity to actually use my personality.” I’ll do goofy songs and dances, and freestyle rap songs, and stuff like that. I have one that I do where, if I noticed that a prospect has viewed my LinkedIn profile, that’s what’s triggering me to reach out to them, because it’s a little bit more of a warm lead.

Dave Lorenzo:               Sure, absolutely.

Jeremy L.:                     They just looked at my LinkedIn profile, so then if I looked at theirs and I see that they’re a good account, they’re a good prospect, then the first email that I’m going to send them says, subject line will say, “Made you a music video.” Who’s not going to open that email, if that’s their subject line? Made you a music video. And then I have this video where, you know, the Michael Jackson and Rockwell song, Somebody’s Watching Me.

Dave Lorenzo:               Yep.

Jeremy L.:                     I’m playing that song and I’m dancing to that song and then one of my coworkers is in the background peering around from around the corner, like, watching me from behind. Something around the corner, and it’s just a 30 second video of me dancing around, and he’s back there. But I put that, if they viewed my profile, and in the email I say, “Hey, so-and-so, I noticed you viewed my profile so I wanted to reach out but didn’t want to be weird about it, so made you this video.”

Jeremy L.:                     And then there’s the video that’s embedded into the email.

Dave Lorenzo:               What a great idea.

Jeremy L.:                     And then right below that, below that I put a one or two sentence value prop that’s specific to them. I mean, I don’t just send a video, you know? There has to be some actual value for them and their business, but then I do a call to action. I send that. You know, that’s just one example of the ways you could kind of use humor to break through the noise and actually come across as more of a human instead of a robot.

Dave Lorenzo:               That’s wonderful. That’s fantastic. And that tool, again, was called Vidyard. We’ll put the link in the notes. V-I-D-Y-A-R-D, is that right?

Jeremy L.:                     Yes. You’re right, yeah.

Dave Lorenzo:               We’ll put a link to their website in the show notes so that people can go check out that tool. Now, tell me a little bit about LeadIQ. Tell me how it’s going to help. Let’s say I’m the CEO of a B2B company. How is it going to help my folks? It’s going to save us six hours a week, we’re going to wind up closing more deals as a result, but what does the tool actually do? Is it a contact database? How do you get the information? Tell us about it.

Jeremy L.:                     Sure. The main way a lot of people use LeadIQ is as an extension of LinkedIn. So, LinkedIn is the world’s most up to date and accurate database of people and where they work, and we work as an extension of LinkedIn, making it really fast, easy, efficient, for sales reps to find people on LinkedIn, whether it’s just one at a time, you’re on somebody’s profile and you’re just looking at that one person, or if you have a list of people and you’re looking at a list of people, that you’ve built this list in LinkedIn by putting in different search parameters and filters.

Jeremy L.:                     And LeadIQ makes it really fast and easy to push all those leads into the CRM with one click with their cellphone number and email address, and information about their company, technologies being used at that company, et cetera.

Dave Lorenzo:               Wow. So, LeadIQ captures all that information off of LinkedIn, so if you’re a sales rep out there, and you’re spending hours and hours and hours going through and trying to find their contact information, this does it for you. If you are the CEO of a company and you have a sales team, this will save your sales team, on average, six hours per person per week. In that six hours per week, you could end up closing six more deals at minimum, so you’re making more money by using the tool.

Dave Lorenzo:               How does LeadIQ work in terms of pricing? It’s software as a service I’m assuming, right? So, there’s a pricing model, and I’m assuming they get a break for the more people they have in their company.

Jeremy L.:                     Correct. Yep, so yeah, you have it right. It’s a per license model. It’s a certain amount per user, and then there’s price breaks, so as you add more users the price per user goes down. Yep.

Dave Lorenzo:               Jeremy, if I’m an entrepreneur out there, and I’m spending my time, half of my time is selling, half of my time is doing my thing, can I just get one license for LeadIQ? Can I sign up for just one license, or is it only for big sales teams?

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. You can sign up just for one user. Absolutely. Yeah.

Dave Lorenzo:               And the website for LeadIQ is L-E-A-D-I-Q.com, right? It’s LeadIQ.com.

Jeremy L.:                     Yep.

Dave Lorenzo:               Now, Jeremy, if our folks want to get in touch with you, what’s the best way for them to get in touch with you so they can learn more about you and what you do in sales and how you can break the ice and maybe meet girls?

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah, exactly. I’ll happily be your wing man if you’re in the Boston area. Yeah, you can look me up on LinkedIn. Just search Jeremy Leveille on LinkedIn. Connect with me there, or drop me an email, jeremy@leadiq.com. Happy to chat and help people out.

Dave Lorenzo:               Perfect, Jeremy. Now, the last couple questions I always ask our guests, so that people know what the best conferences are and what the best places to go for good information about B2B sales are, tell me about conferences that you attend that you found valuable. Tell me about websites that you go to to check out what’s going on in the industry, and where you go to get better.

Dave Lorenzo:               Conferences you attend. Where do you go to connect with other people and to discover new things?

Jeremy L.:                     Sure. I’m part of the Enterprise Sales Forum, which is a global organization that has different chapters. You know, there’s chapters in London, in Boston. You know, all these different cities, that puts on, they’re usually once a month, sales networking events, where they’ll have a panel of experts speaking on a particular topic, and before the panel discussion is networking with beer and wine and food and stuff like that.

Jeremy L.:                     So, Enterprise Sales Forum is definitely a good one that I attend a lot of those events. AAISP, Association of Inside Sales Professionals, puts on lots of really good events including the Leadership Summit with lots of sales leaders that go there. I enjoy going to those events, and then also there’s the Sales Development Conference that Tenbound put on last year, and I believe they’re putting it on again this year.

Jeremy L.:                     Outreach and SalesLoft, a couple other sales tools. They put on conferences as well. Outreach is called Unleash and SalesLoft is called Rainmaker. Very good conferences for sales, as well as Drift. Drift puts on a conference called Hyper Growth. That’s really good, and Outbound is another good one. There’s lots of good conferences to check out, for sure, as well as Dream Force. That’s probably the biggest one of all.

Dave Lorenzo:               That Sales Force has.

Jeremy L.:                     The one that Sales Force puts on, yeah.

Dave Lorenzo:               Alright. Terrific. Jeremy’s given us a bunch of resources. We’ll pull those out of the transcript for you and put them in the show notes so you can go check ’em out and see what’s right for you to attend. Remember, conferences are an opportunity for you to go meet other professionals who are doing what you do to network with them, to really discover new ways to connect with people and deliver value. Also, you never know who’s going to be at a conference, and if you’re a superstar sales professional, you could hook up with the next hot company and become the top sales professional for Sales Force, and make a boatload of money.

Dave Lorenzo:               Or the top sales professional for the next Microsoft, and make a boatload of money. So, you have to go to … you have to pick and choose which conferences you go to, ’cause they take up time, but go to conferences and network with people who do what you do so that you can sharpen the saw, get better at your craft, and also meet people who can be influential in your career moving forward.

Dave Lorenzo:               Jeremy Leveille, it’s been great to have you on the show. What is the one thing you want people to remember about you and about the time we spent together? What’s the one big takeaway you want folks to grab from the last 20 minutes?

Jeremy L.:                     Yeah, I think the biggest thing is when you’re prospecting and reaching out to potential buyers, don’t just play the volume game, and do spray and pray. Be relevant. Have some relevant insight that you can provide to that person. So, you know, you don’t have to spend an hour doing research on that company, and on that person, and know where they went to college, and what their favorite sports team and hobby is. You know, but just have some relevant insight that you can share with them that’s actually going to add some value so that they sit back in their chair and say, “Hey, that conversation that I just had with that salesperson was really valuable. I learned a lot of new stuff that’s going to help my business. I would actually pay for that conversation.”

Jeremy L.:                     That should be the goal, and that’s what’s going to move deals forward and help get deals int pipeline.

Dave Lorenzo:               There you go. Deliver value first, and then worry about closing the deal afterwards. Jeremy has a singular focus: he gets on the phone, he leads with value, he looks for the appointment, and then he demonstrates even more value on the appointment, and that’s how he gets deals done. Jeremy, you’ve been an incredible resource for us. You’ve given us a ton of tips. Folks, I want you just to pick one of the things that Jeremy shared with us today, and I want you to do this and sell more.

Dave Lorenzo:               Until next time, I’m Dave Lorenzo, and we’ll see you back here every Thursday with more great guests who give you tips that you can extract, and take, and put into action, and do what the name of the show says: do this, sell more. Jeremy, thanks very much.

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About Jeremy Leveille

Jeremy’s been in sales for nearly 10 years, with experience ranging from direct sales to channel. He’s found a niche in business development, as he’s exceeded quota for nine months in a row including one month with 69 meetings set. This resulted in Jeremy being voted SDR of the Year at the Sales Development Conference by Tenbound in 2018.

Jeremy has also performed stand-up comedy and is proud of his NBA throwback jersey collection.

Connect with Jeremy Leveille

Website: LeadIQ.com

Email: Jeremy@LeadIQ.com

LinkedIn: Jeremy Leveille

About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/

Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo

Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo

Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo

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Inbound sales is a significant focus for every business. On this episode of the Do This Sell More show, we focus on the best ways to grow inbound sales. - In this episode, Dave and Jeremy discuss: What clicked for Jeremy in sales. Inbound sales is a significant focus for every business. On this episode of the Do This Sell More show, we focus on the best ways to grow inbound sales.<br /> <br /> In this episode, Dave and Jeremy discuss:<br /> <br /> What clicked for Jeremy in sales.<br /> Jeremy’s approach – both in social settings and in sales settings.<br /> How your mindset shifts when you just go in without a fear of rejection.<br /> The connection between comedy and sales.<br /> <br /> Key Takeaways and actionable tips:<br /> <br /> Interact with strangers in public, and your sales skills will become better.<br /> A brushoff doesn’t mean they aren’t interested, it means they aren’t paying attention, so reframe your question and get their attention.<br /> Be strategic in your prospecting – not everyone will connect to the same pitch.<br /> Be human, not a robot, in your interactions with others.<br /> <br /> “Be comfortable and confident with who you are and being able to walk up to anybody, any stranger, and just be able to have that charisma and confidence to strike up a conversation with anybody.”– Jeremy Leveille<br /> How to Maximize Inbound Sales<br /> <br />  <br /> Here is the Transcript for How to Maximize Inbound Sales<br /> Dave Lorenzo:               This is the Do This Sell More show. I'm your host Dave Lorenzo, and we have a great show for you today. I have today for you the guy who's going to teach you how to maximize your inbound sales. That's right; this is someone who's doing this every single day, and folks, that's what makes us different here at Do This Sell More. We bring you the people who can make this happen for you, because they're doing it themselves.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:               There's no academic theory, there's no people out there who wrote a book, and are just trying to hump a book, and get you to do techniques that they've heard about but never done. We've got actual experts using the tools that they're going to discuss with us today.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:               So, let me tell you a little bit about Jeremy Leveille. Jeremy is an absolute expert on inbound sales, and he's been in sales for 10 years with experience ranging from direct sales to channel. He really has found a niche in business development, and has exceeded his quota for nine months in a row, including one month with 69 meetings set. That's more than two meetings everyday. Even if he's working on weekends, that's absolutely crazy.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:               This has resulted in him being voted sales development rep of the year at the Sales Development Conference by Tenbound, and this was in 2019. Jeremy's with LeadIQ, which is a fantastic tool for you to use to get contact information for people so that you know you're going to get through to them when you want to reach them. But without further adieu, I want to welcome Jeremy to the show.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:               Jeremy, thanks for joining us today.<br /> <br /> Jeremy L.:                     Thanks so much, Dave. It's a pleasure to be here.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:               Now, Jeremy, tell me a little bit. Just give me your background real quick. Tell me what drove you to get into sales and why you've stayed in it for so long. What gets you fired up about sales every day?<br /> <br /> Jeremy L.:                     Yeah. I actually have a unique story as somebody that has overcome some challenges, and it's like this underdog story; somebody that was down, and then was able to rise up from the ashes. In the beginning, I wasn't very good at sales. I sucked at sales in the beginning when I wasn't as mature, and I didn't have the sales skills, or business acumen, or people skills that I do now.<br /> <br /> Jeremy L.:                     I've been fired from three or four different sales jobs early in my career. Early, mid 20s. But then I didn't give up. I stuck with it. Dave Lorenzo clean 27:18
Lou Diamond: Thrive With The Master Connector | Do This Sell More Show 3 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/11/lou-diamond/ Thu, 11 Apr 2019 16:00:12 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2501 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/11/lou-diamond/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/11/lou-diamond/feed/ 0 Are you ready to become a master connector? Each week Dave Lorenzo interviews a business leader who knows how to grow revenue with relationship sales. He does this on his YouTube Show titled Do This Sell More. The show is also released as a podcast. This week Dave interviews master connector and best selling author Lou Diamond. In this episode, Dave and Lou discuss: The most effective way to sell. Understanding the people we are trying to sell to and how we can best help them. The critical mistake not to make when you’re looking to connect. Customizing as you prospect. Key Takeaways and actionable tips: The excess of screen time is affecting not only our eyes, but also our souls. The only person that matters in the room is the person that you are pitching and connecting to. Ask great questions. The most successful people are the ones that prepare the most. “What’s the most appropriate situation that they like to connect in? Get them comfortable. It may not be your comfort zone but find out where they feel the most open and are the most willing to share, so that you can find out what their world is about.” – Lou Diamond Here is the interview with Lou Diamond the Master Connector     Here is the transcript of the interview with Lou Diamond the Master Connector Dave Lorenzo:               This is the Do This Sell More Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today, it is my honor to welcome Mr. Lou Diamond to the show. Let me tell you a little bit about Lou. I'm going to read it, so that I don't miss out on anything that's critically important. Lou Diamond is the Master Connector. He has over a quarter of a century of experience in sales, relationship management, business development and executive mentoring. He's an international keynote speaker. He's a consultant. He consults on leadership and performance and he mentors people on the same. He's a bestselling author. He has a Podcast. He's also a TV host and the CEO of THRIVE. Dave Lorenzo:               Now, that's a company focused on marketing the most amazing people, businesses and brands. He helps them become even more amazing through the power of connecting. Welcome to the show, Mr. Lou Diamond. Lou Diamond:               Dave Lorenzo. Absolutely an honor to be here. So much so that I broke out the cowboy hat. Dave Lorenzo:               Fantastic. Lou, I love the art of connecting. Can you give the folks, who are listening ... The people who are listening are probably, I would say they're independent professionals. They are folks who are in B2B sales. So talk about connecting and talk about ... Tell us how that's helped you in your career. Lou Diamond:               To simply put it, I think as you mentioned, the name of the company, something magical happens when you have a connection with someone. You truly, as I like to say, thrive. You can't thrive unless you connect. So many people don't actually know exactly how to connect. We live in a world today, Dave, where we have so much screen time, it's affecting not only our eyes but our souls. Everyone is craving connection. It turns out that, what I've always been about, is that we actually have "muscles". I'm putting that in quotes here. That are how you need to be, to be a better connector. Lou Diamond:               Whether it's yourself, as an individual trying to connect, if it's a sales or maybe you're trying to get a job interview or connect yourself or connect your message to raise money or funds to get your story out. If you're a leader to connect with the people that work in your organization. If you're a company and you want your message to connect with your end audience. There are skills that you can work on, that I call your connecting core. You can actually learn and coach and work on every single day to help develop those skills to connect better. Dave Lorenzo:               Alright, give us an example of some of the skills. Are you ready to become a master connector?

Each week Dave Lorenzo interviews a business leader who knows how to grow revenue with relationship sales. He does this on his YouTube Show titled Do This Sell More. The show is also released as a podcast. This week Dave interviews master connector and best selling author Lou Diamond.

In this episode, Dave and Lou discuss:

  • The most effective way to sell.
  • Understanding the people we are trying to sell to and how we can best help them.
  • The critical mistake not to make when you’re looking to connect.
  • Customizing as you prospect.

Key Takeaways and actionable tips:

  • The excess of screen time is affecting not only our eyes, but also our souls.
  • The only person that matters in the room is the person that you are pitching and connecting to.
  • Ask great questions.
  • The most successful people are the ones that prepare the most.

“What’s the most appropriate situation that they like to connect in? Get them comfortable. It may not be your comfort zone but find out where they feel the most open and are the most willing to share, so that you can find out what their world is about.” – Lou Diamond

Here is the interview with Lou Diamond the Master Connector

 

 

Here is the transcript of the interview with Lou Diamond the Master Connector

Dave Lorenzo:               This is the Do This Sell More Show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today, it is my honor to welcome Mr. Lou Diamond to the show. Let me tell you a little bit about Lou. I’m going to read it, so that I don’t miss out on anything that’s critically important. Lou Diamond is the Master Connector. He has over a quarter of a century of experience in sales, relationship management, business development and executive mentoring. He’s an international keynote speaker. He’s a consultant. He consults on leadership and performance and he mentors people on the same. He’s a bestselling author. He has a Podcast. He’s also a TV host and the CEO of THRIVE.

Dave Lorenzo:               Now, that’s a company focused on marketing the most amazing people, businesses and brands. He helps them become even more amazing through the power of connecting. Welcome to the show, Mr. Lou Diamond.

Lou Diamond:               Dave Lorenzo. Absolutely an honor to be here. So much so that I broke out the cowboy hat.

Dave Lorenzo:               Fantastic. Lou, I love the art of connecting. Can you give the folks, who are listening … The people who are listening are probably, I would say they’re independent professionals. They are folks who are in B2B sales. So talk about connecting and talk about … Tell us how that’s helped you in your career.

Lou Diamond:               To simply put it, I think as you mentioned, the name of the company, something magical happens when you have a connection with someone. You truly, as I like to say, thrive. You can’t thrive unless you connect. So many people don’t actually know exactly how to connect. We live in a world today, Dave, where we have so much screen time, it’s affecting not only our eyes but our souls. Everyone is craving connection. It turns out that, what I’ve always been about, is that we actually have “muscles”. I’m putting that in quotes here. That are how you need to be, to be a better connector.

Lou Diamond:               Whether it’s yourself, as an individual trying to connect, if it’s a sales or maybe you’re trying to get a job interview or connect yourself or connect your message to raise money or funds to get your story out. If you’re a leader to connect with the people that work in your organization. If you’re a company and you want your message to connect with your end audience. There are skills that you can work on, that I call your connecting core. You can actually learn and coach and work on every single day to help develop those skills to connect better.

Dave Lorenzo:               Alright, give us an example of some of the skills. Tell us what we can do to improve them.

Lou Diamond:               Let’s start out with one of my favorite ones, which is really simple. One of the muscles is the power of empathy.

Lou Diamond:               Too often, and if you’ve seen this, some people come in with a capabilities presentation about their company and all the great things that they can do. What I’m great at, what my company does. I always loved that thing, Dave, where people show the logo slide. They lead with, here are all the great companies that we have worked with, that aren’t you. At the end of the day, the only person that matters in the room is the person that you’re pitching and connecting to. I love to make the expression that we are never in the business of selling. I know this is the strategic sales academy and Do This Sell More. But the reality is the most effective way to sell is to help somebody buy. To do that, we need to stand in the shoes of another, to see things from their world, so that we understand as a partner with that potential partner, how we can help them, not how you’re going to help yourself.

Lou Diamond:               A lot of that is the way that we listen. We do this by asking great questions. We do this by truly seeing things from their point of view. That’s actually called listening level two, which is a focused listening that nothing else matters, but the partner that you’re working with. The ability to get out of your own ego and jump in and step in and sell from a point of view, where you’re helping them to buy. That is a key muscle and the power of empathy that I work on them. One of the many other ones, that are out there in the connecting core. Helpful?

Dave Lorenzo:               Fantastic. We’re talking with Lou Diamond. Lou is the Master Connector. Lou’s helping us make connections in a way that are absolutely real. One of the things, Lou, that I focus on, with my clients, is relationship development. Help our listeners, help me with developing relationships. How do we get started? In a sales environment, people are always going to be skeptical. They put up that wall. They put up that barrier. I want to be empathetic. I want to connect. Tell me how I can do that, at the outset, when they know I’m there and they know I make my money by selling a product or a service.

Lou Diamond:               I think the most important way to start out is simply put, and I started to say this, to ask great questions. If you’re looking to find out what somebody does or what their business does, you really understand, hey listen, we’re in the world of helping people from a marketing perspective. We have a technology offering. What I want to understand right now, is the current world that you have. Let’s say you’re trying to offer a technology solution that’s going to help someone’s business. Let’s understand what their business is about. What their goals are, first. Ask them those questions. What are you trying to get this year? It’s the beginning of the year that we’re recording this? What are we looking for for our goals for this year? Were you happy with what you had from last year? What’s been keeping you up at night?

Lou Diamond:               What are the things that you need the most help with? Let me see if I can help you in that area. Here’s the most important part. If you start having a conversation with someone and they’re not letting you in and they’re not opening up, well first of all, physically start opening up. When you went to connect with someone, you got to let yourself open and be like this. Like physically, if you can see me here, open to the person that you’re connecting to. If they’re reserved and being like this, there’s actually a mirroring reaction that you’re looking for. What you want to try to do is to get them to open up a little, too. That’s where connection begins. If they’re not willing to do this, this is important. Some people aren’t ready to connect. You have to approach them at a time that is the most appropriate for them to do it. Trying to make a connection, let’s say in a big trade hall and a conference center or a trade show, is a very challenging thing to do.

Lou Diamond:               Dave, I like to think of it as what’s the most appropriate situation that they like to connect in and get them comfortable. It might not be your comfort zone, but find out where they’re the most comfortable and where they feel open to share, so that you can understand what their world was about.

Dave Lorenzo:               All right, great advice. We’re speaking with Lou Diamond. He’s the Master Connector and the name of his company is THRIVE. Lou, tell me, is there anything, what’s the one thing I shouldn’t do? What’s the critical mistake I shouldn’t make, when I’m looking to connect?

Lou Diamond:               I want to make this clear. For those that are going to conferences or trade shows and they’ve got a stack of business cards, this high and you’re so tempted to give out these business cards, I want to make this clear. If you lead by giving out your business card, you are not connecting. You might be networking or following up in some way, but if you start to give someone something because you feel you need to give that to them, the only reason you should ever give your information is because you’ve connected with someone and that person asks for it. That’s asking permission. Where they say, what’s the best way for me to get in contact with you? You know when this logical point happens. How often have you ever come to a situation somebody meets you, and the first thing they say, here, take my card.

Lou Diamond:               Nobody wants to take a card. I don’t want to. I don’t want to throw it right in the garbage. I want to know why I’d be taking that card. What is the world that you’re going to do this? If someone says, listen, I really want to follow up with you. I want to learn more. Lou, what’s the best way for us to get in contact? Now, until you’ve made that connection, that’s when you have the permission to go do so. A great taboo thing that you should avoid if you come home from a trade show, a networking meeting, an opportunity to promote your own business with 50 business cards, you really should be questioning the amount that you got. But, if you have the ones that you received, that really were the people that you followed up with. Take a pen, write down on the card that specific item that you did.

Lou Diamond:               Good colleague of mine, David Newman, who’s been in the business for a long time. David and I had this piece where we met at a trade show, at a conference, I think it was actually a conference in Dallas, and the first thing he did was he says, can I have your card? He wrote down specifically the reason he wanted to follow up with me. When he got back to me, did something amazing. He did one of those video and BombBomb things where you sent the message and he’s reading the card. He goes, I remembered this conversation. I wanted to get a face to face to continue our conversation. What makes the most sense for you? Great way to connect with another individual.

Dave Lorenzo:               Fantastic, excellent advice. Lou Diamond is the Master Connector. His website is thriveloud altogether. T H R I V E L O U D.com. I’m going to put the link in the show notes to his website. Also put a link to his book on the website in the show notes and on YouTube. If you’re watching this on YouTube when Lou said you have to have open body language, he was talking about having your arms spread at a normal distance, not standing at attention like a soldier. When he said that your body language was more guarded, he had his arms crossed in front of him, as if he was cold and he was shivering. That’s what you don’t want.

Dave Lorenzo:               Lou, tell me about prospecting in your system and in what you teach. How do you teach your clients, cause I know you work with a lot of clients, you work with big businesses. Tell me how you teach people to go out and prospect without coming across from a standpoint of being empathetic, from a standpoint of wanting to develop a relationship. How do they prospect? Is it just cold calling, but they do it in a different way? What advice do you give people, when it comes to prospecting?

Lou Diamond:               I think it’s very important to remember that the most successful people are the ones that prepare the most. If you know you’re going to an event and a trade show, get the list of the people that are coming to the event and identify and highlight the ones you want to see. If you have a target list of clients you want to go after, there’s amazing resources out there from LinkedIn, the Internet, everywhere you go, where you can research and get information ahead of time, so that you can be as smart as you can and prepare. I love to say, Dave, everything that I’m about is either before the pitch, as it relates to building that prospecting. What are the things you need to do before you ever walk into a room to pitch? In fact, the pitch should almost be a regular conversation that you’ve already partnered with them, because you’ve done so much great connecting, strategizing, and follow through before you ever even got in the sales room with them.

Lou Diamond:               As it relates to prospecting, you can’t take away, you need a little elbow grease and hard work. You got to do the work. It is a little bit of a numbers game, like anything else. You’re going to have to go after 10 prospects, to get one or two real ones that are out there. Use effective messaging and something that’s customized to the specific target you’re going after. People are tired. I will say this, there’s nothing more irritating. I don’t have my phone here, I don’t know where it went, but I was going to pick up my phone. Every morning I wake up, there’s seven or eight LinkedIn cold call requests for me, right? This is not connecting. By the way, I find this almost a waste of time. You might have a success rate, but you’re not successfully going after those that need what you need.

Lou Diamond:               Getting a customized response from somebody is a true effort to understand what their needs are. I’ve just read this article about you on LinkedIn or in some place in business where you just had activity. We’ve done something similar with another organization. I’d love the opportunity to follow up with you. That message can’t go to every single one. That’s the effort you need to do, to make sure that you customize as you prospect. The reason I stress this is, you can’t come off as connecting if you’re just blasting out and behaving in the way that you email, you market, even you phone call, picking up the calls, you have to have that specific customized response within the prospect thing. It’s extra work, but that level of preparation increases the likelihood that you’re pitching and you’re going to close more successfully.

Dave Lorenzo:               Okay, fantastic. Great advice, Lou. Now let’s shift to high net worth individuals. If I’m a financial advisor and I’m established in my career, maybe I’m 15 or 20 years in, and I’m doing well. I deepened my relationships with my clients and I got that down. Now I’m looking for bigger fish. I’m hunting for bigger game. What do I do? Is it any different when I’m going after high net worth individuals versus individual product sales? Is the approach any different?

Lou Diamond:               In theory, no. But, in the specifics of high net worth individuals understands people like … I always liked to say that there’s the analogy, think of the car that you want. What’s the image that you want to present of yourself? Think of it as a car. Are you the person driving the Mercedes? That’s what people want to aspire and attract to. Keep in mind that when you’re dealing with high net worth individuals, coming up with a beat up Chevy, that type of way that you dress, the way that you look. I forgot that we were going to be on camera today. That’s why it came straight from the gym and put on a cowboy hat. But, in the messaging of working with high net worth individuals, it is important to understand, to put them in the comfort zone that they’re most comfortable with.

Lou Diamond:               I like to do the research of these people. We have a lot of people, who grew up traditionally, your suit and tie folks, who have a certain brand of how it works for their financial matching and what they expect to see on the other end. If you’re catering to that, you have to look like that. You have to act the part, you have to speak the part, and you have to know their business. How you can help with people. It’s very difficult if the clients that you’re working with, are not in that space and you’re trying to message that up to play in that space. I know that’s a big challenge, but as you move your way up, you have to figure out the ways that work, to who you are and how to balance it. Once you’re there and you’re dealing with it, you’re a very comfortable person to work with. Connecting is as similar as it is to every other level. It doesn’t matter what your net worth is, it’s just understanding specifically, how you can help them on their needs.

Dave Lorenzo:               Fantastic. Thank you. Lou. Tell me, real quick, last question I have for you. Then we’ll talk a little bit about you and what you have going on. Tell me about you and how you’re comfortable when somebody pitches you, or when somebody sells you. How you like people to approach you with new ideas or new products or new services?

Lou Diamond:               In the same way that I want. I want them asking me as many questions as possible. I want them to step into my shoes. See things from my perspective. Most importantly not flip it back and have them tell me, well, let me tell you what I’m doing. There’s nothing more distasteful in that piece. I’m like, well, I’m not you. Tell me how you could step into my shoes and know what I’m about. By doing that, asking the right questions, where am I right now? What are my current needs and problems? Help me by, is really what I’m looking for. Those that do that well, understand my goals and my immediate aspirations, for what I’m trying to get to and if they can solve the problem. The best sales technique I’d ever seen in my life for someone trying to connect with me, was they heard where I was at and there wasn’t exactly a match. The best thing that individual said is, I’m not at that stage with you right now.

Lou Diamond:               I can’t help you here. Here’s who can. Here’s the best part, I’ve probably recommended more people to that individual, who did not take on my business because they knew they couldn’t help me at that time. That is truly understanding who your customer is. I love the expression, Dave, get to no faster. If you’re working with somebody and you recognize right away, that it’s not going to happen, get to no and say, listen, this is not, no or not yet. I’m not there yet with you. I’m not going to be able to be the one to help you, but when you get to this part, I’m your man. I’m your woman. I’m the person who’s going to be able to help you, at that stage.

Dave Lorenzo:               That’s fantastic. Great Advice. Get to no faster. I love that. Alright, Lou, so tell us now about you.

Dave Lorenzo:               Tell us how we can help you. First, tell us about the book. Where can people get the book? Then tell us about your company and you’re speaking.

Lou Diamond:               If you want to get the book, learn about speaking, you can either go to loudiamond.net or to thriveloud.com either one. The book is Master the Art of Connecting. We have links on all of that. It sells on Amazon. It’s been a best seller. It continues to come out. We’re actually coming out with the audio book later this year. There are two more books coming out within the near future, towards the end of the year. Be on the lookout for Before the Pitch. That’s coming out, probably in the fall. As for me speaking, go to loudiamond.net. You can get all the information, videos, me speaking, working with you. If you’re looking to figure out all the things you need to do, to prepare your sales team, to propel your organization, I come in, I speak to companies, organizations, and trade shows.

Lou Diamond:               I do this big conversation, Dave, about connect working, which is to kick off a lot of these large trade shows, on how you need to be at the trade show, so that you can maximize that event the most. It’s a nice kickoff for all the conferences that you go to and helping people to maximize their time there. They can connect with the right people in that environment when they’re there.

Dave Lorenzo:               That’s something that a company would bring you in to do before they had folks going out to a trade show, right?

Lou Diamond:               Or to kick it off. It’s very difficult …

Dave Lorenzo:               To start the event. Okay.

Lou Diamond:               To start the event. Hey, you’ve got this incredible roster of events to do. Let me tell you how you’re going to maximize this trade show. The best way for you to behave when you’re there. It’s a great way to … You’ve come to the event, you want to make it the most useful for yourself. This is the best way to utilize it that way. The other thing I guess we can promote, if you go to THRIVE Loud, you could also go to another show. Which I’m sure one day, we’ll have the Dave Lorenzo on, on the thriveloud.com to check it out. Another fun show to learn how people are thriving in their lives, their businesses, and their passions, through the power of connecting.

Dave Lorenzo:               Alright, so it’s loudiamond.net and thriveloud.com, T H R I V E L O U D.com, thrive loud.com for all things Lou Diamond. He’s the Master Connector. He gave us just a few minutes of fantastic advice here. If you go to his website or you book him to speak, I’m sure you will get a fire hose of advice. It’ll just come out all over you, like drinking from a fire hose. Lou Diamond, the Master Connector. I am deeply appreciative for you being on the show. Thank you for giving us your time today. This is the Do This Sell More Show. Lou gave us so much, that you can do and sell more. I look forward to seeing you right back here, next week. I’m Dave Lorenzo. Between now and then, make sure you Do This and Sell More.

 

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About Lou Diamond

Lou Diamond is THE Master Connector. He has over a quarter century of experience in sales, relationship management, business development and executive coaching.

Lou is an International Speaker, Motivator, Consultant, Coach, and Best-selling Author.  He was a top producer for Accenture, Deloitte, Omnicom, Merrill Lynch and Bank of America, leading teams to achieve record revenues year after year.

Lou is the CEO and founder of THRIVE, a leading consulting and coaching firm focused on making the most incredible leaders, performers and companies even more amazing.  He hosts Thrive LOUD, one of the most popular business podcast shows dedicated to inspiring people to reach their peak potential in every facet of their life.

Lou has consulted, mentored and presented to leading performers at hundreds of companies across the globe. His authenticity, energy and enthusiasm, along with his unwavering passion and desire for helping people achieve their business and personal goals, is unmatched.

 

Connect with Lou Diamond

Twitter:  @thriveloud

Instagram@thriveloud

Facebook: ThriveLoud

LinkedIn: Thrive Loud

Website:  loudiamond.net

Show: Thrive Loud with Lou Diamond

Book: Master the Art of Connecting

 

About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

 

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/

Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo

Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo

Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo

 

 

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Are you ready to become a master connector? - Each week Dave Lorenzo interviews a business leader who knows how to grow revenue with relationship sales. He does this on his YouTube Show titled Do This Sell More. Are you ready to become a master connector?<br /> <br /> Each week Dave Lorenzo interviews a business leader who knows how to grow revenue with relationship sales. He does this on his YouTube Show titled Do This Sell More. The show is also released as a podcast. This week Dave interviews master connector and best selling author Lou Diamond.<br /> <br /> In this episode, Dave and Lou discuss:<br /> <br /> The most effective way to sell.<br /> Understanding the people we are trying to sell to and how we can best help them.<br /> The critical mistake not to make when you’re looking to connect.<br /> Customizing as you prospect.<br /> <br /> Key Takeaways and actionable tips:<br /> <br /> The excess of screen time is affecting not only our eyes, but also our souls.<br /> The only person that matters in the room is the person that you are pitching and connecting to.<br /> Ask great questions.<br /> The most successful people are the ones that prepare the most.<br /> <br /> “What’s the most appropriate situation that they like to connect in? Get them comfortable. It may not be your comfort zone but find out where they feel the most open and are the most willing to share, so that you can find out what their world is about.” – Lou Diamond<br /> Here is the interview with Lou Diamond the Master Connector<br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> Here is the transcript of the interview with Lou Diamond the Master Connector<br /> Dave Lorenzo:               This is the Do This Sell More Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today, it is my honor to welcome Mr. Lou Diamond to the show. Let me tell you a little bit about Lou. I'm going to read it, so that I don't miss out on anything that's critically important. Lou Diamond is the Master Connector. He has over a quarter of a century of experience in sales, relationship management, business development and executive mentoring. He's an international keynote speaker. He's a consultant. He consults on leadership and performance and he mentors people on the same. He's a bestselling author. He has a Podcast. He's also a TV host and the CEO of THRIVE.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:               Now, that's a company focused on marketing the most amazing people, businesses and brands. He helps them become even more amazing through the power of connecting. Welcome to the show, Mr. Lou Diamond.<br /> <br /> Lou Diamond:               Dave Lorenzo. Absolutely an honor to be here. So much so that I broke out the cowboy hat.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:               Fantastic. Lou, I love the art of connecting. Can you give the folks, who are listening ... The people who are listening are probably, I would say they're independent professionals. They are folks who are in B2B sales. So talk about connecting and talk about ... Tell us how that's helped you in your career.<br /> <br /> Lou Diamond:               To simply put it, I think as you mentioned, the name of the company, something magical happens when you have a connection with someone. You truly, as I like to say, thrive. You can't thrive unless you connect. So many people don't actually know exactly how to connect. We live in a world today, Dave, where we have so much screen time, it's affecting not only our eyes but our souls. Everyone is craving connection. It turns out that, what I've always been about, is that we actually have "muscles". I'm putting that in quotes here. That are how you need to be, to be a better connector.<br /> <br /> Lou Diamond:               Whether it's yourself, as an individual trying to connect, if it's a sales or maybe you're trying to get a job interview or connect yourself or connect your message to raise money or funds to get your story out. If you're a leader to connect with the people that work in your organization. If you're a company and you want your message to connect with your end audience. There are skills that you can work on, that I call your connecting core. Dave Lorenzo clean 20:46
Alan Weiss: No Guilt, No Fear, No Peer | Do This Sell More Show 2 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/04/alan-weiss/ Thu, 04 Apr 2019 07:00:05 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2500 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/04/alan-weiss/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/04/alan-weiss/feed/ 0 In this episode, Dave and Alan discuss: Moving beyond your own cocoon and taking in the rest of the world. Differentiating yourself as someone you and others want to know. Networking – it’s a process, not an event. Creating and maintaining a healthy self-esteem when you’re an independent professional or sales executive.   Key Takeaways and actionable tips: Be well-read and well-traveled. Stop talking about your field and start talking about other things. Charge for value. Appear in the public square that makes sense to your clients frequently with new intellectual property. Do not listen to unsolicited feedback. “I focused on developing those relationships at executive levels by being able to talk on a wide variety of topics, but also by being sure that I provided them with such unique value that they started to think, ‘if I’m getting this value for free, what would I get if I hired this guy?’”   – Alan Weiss Connect with Alan Weiss Website: AlanWeiss.com Alan's New Book:  Getting Started in Consulting - 4th Edition Here is the "Behind the Scenes Video" of Dave interviewing Alan No Guilt, No Fear, No Peer - Dave Lorenzo Interviews Alan Weiss   Here is the transcript of the entire interview with Alan Weiss: Dave:                Welcome to the Do This Sell More Show, and this is our very first episode, and I am honored and pleased to welcome a gentleman who has been a mentor to me over the years, and to hundreds of other people. His name is Doctor Alan Weiss, and I'm going to read you a portion of his incredibly impressive bio. Dave:                Alan has attracted clients over the years such as Merck, Hewlett-Packard, GE, Mercedes Benz, State Street Corporation, The Times Mirror Group, and hundreds, hundreds of independent consultants and professional speakers. He speaks himself at 20 keynotes a year, he's one of the best keynote speakers and probably the best keynote speaker you're going to see. He's spoken at Case Western Reserve University, Boston College, Tufts Saint John's, University of Illinois, every university that has brought him in to speak, I'm sure has gotten incredible value from him. He is an inductee into the Professional Speaking Hall of Fame, he also has published over 60 books, including his bestseller, "Million Dollar Consulting." Dave:                And as a special treat to those of you who are joining us on our inaugural episode, if you're listening to this right now and you have a question or you want to mention something of value you got from Alan, I'm going to send you, as long as you send me your email address, I'm going to send you a copy of "Million Dollar Maverick," that's my favorite book that Alan's written. It's one of the over sixty that he's written, and this book is a memoir, along with Alan's tips on how to be a fantastic consultant and deliver value. It is valuable to professional service providers, it's valuable to independent sales professionals, you will get a lot out of it, you'll enjoy it, it's a quick read. So the first ten people that leave a comment on this episode will get a copy of "Million Dollar Maverick." Send me your email address and I'll get your physical address and send it to you. Dave:                Now, without further ado I want to welcome in Alan Weiss, good morning Alan. Alan Weiss:       Good morning Dave, thank you, very happy to be here for your first episode. Thanks for inviting me. Dave:                I appreciate it very much, and I was just saying before we went live that everyone else will have to live up to this standard. So those of you who are future guests, I encourage you to try and outdo the great advice Alan's going to give us today. Dave:                I want to begin with a concept that you teach to those of us who call you a mentor, and that is becoming an object of interest. And I want to get into this by telling a story. In this episode, Dave and Alan discuss:

  • Moving beyond your own cocoon and taking in the rest of the world.
  • Differentiating yourself as someone you and others want to know.
  • Networking – it’s a process, not an event.
  • Creating and maintaining a healthy self-esteem when you’re an independent professional or sales executive.

 

Key Takeaways and actionable tips:

  • Be well-read and well-traveled.
  • Stop talking about your field and start talking about other things.
  • Charge for value.
  • Appear in the public square that makes sense to your clients frequently with new intellectual property.
  • Do not listen to unsolicited feedback.

“I focused on developing those relationships at executive levels by being able to talk on a wide variety of topics, but also by being sure that I provided them with such unique value that they started to think, ‘if I’m getting this value for free, what would I get if I hired this guy?’”   – Alan Weiss

Connect with Alan Weiss

Website: AlanWeiss.com

Alan’s New Book:  Getting Started in Consulting – 4th Edition

Here is the “Behind the Scenes Video” of Dave interviewing Alan

No Guilt, No Fear, No Peer – Dave Lorenzo Interviews Alan Weiss

 

Here is the transcript of the entire interview with Alan Weiss:

Dave:                Welcome to the Do This Sell More Show, and this is our very first episode, and I am honored and pleased to welcome a gentleman who has been a mentor to me over the years, and to hundreds of other people. His name is Doctor Alan Weiss, and I’m going to read you a portion of his incredibly impressive bio.

Dave:                Alan has attracted clients over the years such as Merck, Hewlett-Packard, GE, Mercedes Benz, State Street Corporation, The Times Mirror Group, and hundreds, hundreds of independent consultants and professional speakers. He speaks himself at 20 keynotes a year, he’s one of the best keynote speakers and probably the best keynote speaker you’re going to see. He’s spoken at Case Western Reserve University, Boston College, Tufts Saint John’s, University of Illinois, every university that has brought him in to speak, I’m sure has gotten incredible value from him. He is an inductee into the Professional Speaking Hall of Fame, he also has published over 60 books, including his bestseller, “Million Dollar Consulting.”

Dave:                And as a special treat to those of you who are joining us on our inaugural episode, if you’re listening to this right now and you have a question or you want to mention something of value you got from Alan, I’m going to send you, as long as you send me your email address, I’m going to send you a copy of “Million Dollar Maverick,” that’s my favorite book that Alan’s written. It’s one of the over sixty that he’s written, and this book is a memoir, along with Alan’s tips on how to be a fantastic consultant and deliver value. It is valuable to professional service providers, it’s valuable to independent sales professionals, you will get a lot out of it, you’ll enjoy it, it’s a quick read. So the first ten people that leave a comment on this episode will get a copy of “Million Dollar Maverick.” Send me your email address and I’ll get your physical address and send it to you.

Dave:                Now, without further ado I want to welcome in Alan Weiss, good morning Alan.

Alan Weiss:       Good morning Dave, thank you, very happy to be here for your first episode. Thanks for inviting me.

Dave:                I appreciate it very much, and I was just saying before we went live that everyone else will have to live up to this standard. So those of you who are future guests, I encourage you to try and outdo the great advice Alan’s going to give us today.

Dave:                I want to begin with a concept that you teach to those of us who call you a mentor, and that is becoming an object of interest. And I want to get into this by telling a story. I came to see you earlier this year at your home, at your retreat center. And I took an Uber from the hotel to your house, so the retreat center. And on the way over, I gave the gentleman the address, and you were very detailed in giving me instructions about how to get in the driveway and everything. And I was reading the instructions to him, and he said, “I don’t need that. I know how to get there, I know who this guy is, he’s the guy that drives the Rolls Royce.” So Alan, you are an incredible object of interest. Can you tell those of us who have not yet achieved the level of success yet to have a Rolls Royce, how do we become an object of interest to our audience of prospects and clients?

Alan Weiss:       Well I think you have to become an object of interest to everyone. Don’t just focus on your clients. You have to be well read, you have to be well traveled. I get a kick out of people who tell me, for example, they won’t try uni, a very nice Japanese sushi dish. They won’t try uni because they just don’t like the sound of it, or what it looks like, and so forth. Now if you’ve tasted it, you don’t like it, that’s fine. But not to taste it is ridiculous. I had somebody tell me, I really don’t want to go to Vietnam, I was thinking about holding a special event there, and I really don’t feel like going here, really don’t feel like going there. Well the person’s never been there. And too many people narrow their world arbitrarily like that.

Alan Weiss:       So you have to be willing to travel, to read, and to take in the world around you. Probably of all the reading I do, the least reading would be business books. And so if you want to be an object of interest, you have to talk to people on their own terms. And my wife says I can probably talk to anybody about anything, maybe not in the depth that they can, you know if they’re a musician or a nuclear physicist, but I can talk to them. And so you have to allow yourself to get beyond your particular cocoon, beyond the kind of work you’re doing, and take in the rest of the world.

Dave:                That’s a great concept. So if I’m a financial advisor out there, another story you’ve told is “Hey listen, you’re a great financial advisor, why are you cold calling me? How come I’ve never heard of you?” That financial advisor, how does he establish himself as an expert, differentiate himself from everyone else who does what he does, so that someone who is successful will say, “Hm, this is an interesting person, this is someone I need to get to know more.” How does that financial advisor establish himself as someone who’s an object of curiosity, who you would want to know?

Alan Weiss:       Well, stop talking about finance. Start talking about other things. I remember I met a prospect once, at one of the air clubs in New York, and when I walked in he had been waiting for me, and he had a copy of one of Tom Wolfe’s newest books at the time on the table in front of him. And I said, “Oh, A Man In Full, I finished that, what did you think of it?” And he said “Whoa, whoa, whoa, don’t I haven’t finished it yet. Don’t give anything away.” So we started talking about Tom Wolfe, and then we started talking about some films and so forth. And so before you knew it, we had rapport. We had camaraderie. And so moving into business then, we already had a trusting relationship.

Alan Weiss:       So whether you’re a financial advisor, or you’re a realtor, or you’re an IT specialist, whatever you are doesn’t matter. You need to stop talking about your field. You need to start talking about other things. And that means that every day you need to read. You need to read the Wall Street Journal, you need to read your local newspaper, preferable the New York Times on Sundays, you need to see what’s going on in the world.

Alan Weiss:       And you also need to broaden your experience, and broaden your willingness to consider things. Once you do that, you find that you can talk to people about a wide variety of things, and it gains this momentum toward more of a profound business relationship if you do it that way.

Dave:                That’s great. Now, there’s story that you’ve also told, about … and this is one of the things that endeared you to me early on, ’cause I feel like I’m in the same situation. It’s the story you told about going to a party and sitting on the couch, and you have a unique talent of being able to exchange one glass for another, of your favorite beverage, without ever having to leave or say a word. Tell me how you start those types of conversation, at a cocktail party, or even a networking event. For me, that’s one of the most incredibly awkward times, one of the most incredibly awkward opportunities. So how do you do it?

Alan Weiss:       Well you have to separate what we’re talking about here. I’m not interested in cocktail parties. It’s usually banal kind of small talk, inevitably the people in the room were not people who could help my business, and in fact most of the time they’re not people I’d like to work with. It might be acquaintances and so forth, but these aren’t people who I want to work with or develop long term relationships with, and so if my wife wants to go to one of these things, I’ll sit and drink and keep her happy until we can leave.

Alan Weiss:       Now, networking event is different. At a networking event, what you want to do is find somebody who could be a potential buyer or recommender, and that’s not hard to do. But what you don’t want to do is try to give them a pitch. Try to give them anything. I mean I know people who try to hand out business cards, they even try to hand out books, it’s ridiculous. All you want to do is get them to talk about themselves, tell them that you can provide help, but this isn’t the time or the place, and are they open to have a call or a meeting later in the week. And so it’s a five minute kind of transaction, because networking is a process, not an event.

Alan Weiss:       So one, you make sure you’re talking to a buyer or a recommender, two, you provoke them a little bit, you pique their interest by providing some value, number three you make an appointment to talk to them later. And if you can come out with just two or three of those, in any particular, say, two hour networking event, you’re doing a good job.

Dave:                That’s great. Tell me about when you … I want to take you back to when you first started, and you were just realizing that you had success as a consultant, as an independent professional. What was the most important thing, what was the thing that kind of put you over the top, that took you from survival into thriving?

Alan Weiss:       Well, I think there were two things. The first was, I recognized this was a relationship business. And so you had to establish relationships with true buyers if you’re going to get anywhere. And I focused on developing those relationships at executive levels by being able to talk about a wide variety of topics, but also being sure that I provided them with such unique value that they started to think, “If I’m getting this value for free, what would I get if I hired the guy?”

Alan Weiss:       The second aspect was, I determined since I had come from the training industry, I would never, ever, ever again charge for a box of materials or a participant in a seat, or a time unit. That’s no way to make money, in fact it’s unethical, because clients are entitled to quick resolutions, but the only way you make money that way is through long, elongated solutions. And so, I decided I would charge for value, I really pioneered value-based fees in the consulting profession.

Alan Weiss:       And those activities, developing relationships with executives, and charging for value, is what accelerated my career.

Dave:                You know, it’s funny you say that. That’s how I discovered you, I purchased, I think it was an eight dollar booklet on Amazon in, I want to say it was 2006, on exactly that. On value-based fees.

Alan Weiss:       It was seven dollars.

Dave:                Oh, seven dollars, okay. And I realized at that point that I already had purchased two of your other books. I had originally purchased “Million Dollar Consulting” and the “Million Dollar Consulting toolkit,” and I said “oh, this is the guy who wrote those books.” And to me, that spoke to me. Because I worked over the years with a lot of lawyers, and inherent in their industry is the need to charge by the hour. And it puts in dis-alignment, if that’s the correct tern of a phrase, it puts in dis-alignment their interests and the interests of the client. So that’s how I first ended up meeting you and connecting with you.

Dave:                Now you’ve built an enormous body of work over the years, 60 plus books, hundreds of articles, you speak all over the place, and now with video and audio, podcasts and videos have made you … it’s almost impossible to Google ‘consulting’ without seeing a video or audio program or a book from Alan Weiss. If I just get this concept now, I’m a sales professional or I’m an entrepreneur and I’m just getting this concept, where do I start to build my body of work? What’s your best recommendation for starting to build a body of work?

Alan Weiss:       So, not talking about my body of work, you’re talking about someone building their own body of work?

Dave:                No, no, I’m talking about a … let’s say I’m an entrepreneur, and I own a store, I own a dry cleaning business or I’m a professional working for Stryker selling orthopedic products, I want to differentiate myself by building a body of work. What’s your recommendation on how I get started doing that?

Alan Weiss:       Well you have to appear in the public square frequently. What I call the public square frequently, with new intellectual property. So you need to determine the following, ’cause you mentioned a wide variety of specialties there. What do your ideal buyers read, what do your ideal buyers attend, where do your ideal buyers hang out, and who do your ideal buyers listen to? And once you determine those things, you know where you want to speak, where you want to publish, where you want to network, and who you want to impress. And so you start publishing in those periodicals that those people read. I mean you’re not going to get an article in the Wall Street Journal, but you would get an article in something like Dentistry Today, or something.

Alan Weiss:       You want to start speaking at events they attend, which means trade associations and professional association events. Most importantly, I think, you want to continue to pump new intellectual property into your environment. So the people are getting new ideas, and you’re recognized as the source. So for example I publish more books on consulting than anyone in history. And you want to be in a position where you’re publishing or writing or speaking about more on your specialty than anyone else around.

Alan Weiss:       I’ll tell you one final thing. The major way that people make buying decisions today, is not on the internet. It’s by word of mouth, it’s by peer reference. And Johah Berger, a professor who wrote “Contagion and Invisible Influence” was a guest speaker at one of my events. And his research is fascinating, because only four percent of that kind of word of mouth occurs on the internet. All the rest occur interpersonally, not virtually, but in reality. So these are the people you have to impress, who are talking to each other. Because if you came to me and said, “Alan, I need a good dentist, mine retired.” I would give you the name of my dentist, ’cause I’m doing you a favor, and my dentist a favor. That’s how it works. That’s how peer-to-peer references work, and that’s the sequence we have to get into.

Dave:                Okay. That’s great, I’m going to put a link Johah Berger’s group along with the books I mentioned from you in the show notes. Let’s talk a little bit about that. Last time I spoke with you, you mentioned that you were working on something, I think it’s going to be something, I think it’s going to be a book eventually, called Evangelist Selling, or something along those lines. Tell me about how you create an environment where people are evangelists for you.

Alan Weiss:       Well you attract attractors. And so, what you do is, you know your current clients love you, your prospects don’t love you ’cause they don’t know you. Too often we assume they have to love us too. So I bring these people together. I bring them together at my events, in reality.

Alan Weiss:       For example, in April of 2019 I’m doing the Million Dollar Consulting convention outside of Washinton DC. This is my fifth one. And at that convention will be 140 people or so, some of whom use me as a personal coach, some of whom just read my books and everything in between. And the people who use me to a great extent will be telling the people who don’t, “Here’s a better way to deal with Alan, you have to get engaged with this and that.” That’s evangelistic selling.

Alan Weiss:       I bring them together virtually, as well as in reality. Right now, as you and I are talking, Alan’s Forums dot com is going on 24/7, people in my community automatically belong to it, people outside of it can pay to join for life, and people are exchanging ideas who wouldn’t know each other except through their knowledge of me. And so, right on the forums somebody will say, “Well you have to attend the Million Dollar Consulting College, that’s the next thing you have to do.” So you create that kind of interaction between your best clients and your prospects, so your best clients and your second best clients.

Alan Weiss:       And what happens is, the evangelism is far, far more effective than personal selling.

Dave:                I love it. That tip alone is worth the time that you’ve invested to be with us.

Dave:                We’re talking today with Alan Weiss, he’s the author of over 60 books, if you leave a comment or a question or simply tell us how you like this episode, if you leave it on either iTunes or any of the social media outlets, and you leave me your email address, I’m going to send you a copy of Alan’s fantastic book, my favorite book of the ones he’s written, “Million Dollar Maverick.” I have ten copies left, I’ll be happy to give it to the first ten people who share a comment or a question with us.

Dave:                So, the final topic I want to discuss with you today, Alan, has been the probably the most valuable thing that I’ve gotten from you over the years. And I think I initially read, or I heard you say that when you first began down this road of helping folks with their consulting business, or helping professionals with a professional service business, you thought the biggest issue was going to be lack of financing or the inability to get financing. Yet you found out, I think either quickly or over time, that the issue was not that, and the issue was self-esteem and maintaining a healthy self-esteem while you grow your practice, while you grow your business.

Dave:                And this show, the Do This Sell More Show, is designed to help sales people. And there’s no one that takes a beating in his or her self-esteem as frequently and with as much vigor as the independent sales professional or the entrepreneur starting a business, because we’re all in the sales business.

Dave:                Tell me about creating and maintaining a healthy self-esteem when you’re an independent professional, or a sales executive out there.

Alan Weiss:       Well you can’t let your ego be at risk, you can’t let your ego be vulnerable. You have to understand that just because you get a ‘no,’ doesn’t mean anything about your self worth. You can still be a good person, a valuable, worthy person, even though you haven’t succeeded at something. Behavior is important, not necessarily constant victories. Moreover, if you’re not failing, you’re not trying. Everybody I know, everybody I’ve respected, has failed in the midst of succeeding. And so, you can’t take a setback or a critique or a critical review, or somebody unsubscribing as some kind of personal setback. You just have to accept it as part of life.

Alan Weiss:       You also need a support system. And your family, or your colleagues, or your association friends, or whomever it is, have to constitute a support system, which tells you the truth about things, helps you when you’ve suffered defeats, but also helps you celebrate when you’ve had victories.

Alan Weiss:       And so you have to get over the fact that it’s about you personally. There’s a famous example where somebody took “A Tale of Two Cities,” one of the classic novels of all time by Dickens, and re-typed it on a conventional typewriter, but took off Dickens’s name and put his own name on it. And he submitted it, and four publishers rejected it.

Alan Weiss:       Right? And it just shows, that the editors there didn’t know one thing from another, or they were having bad days. And so you can’t take defeats personally, and you cannot let your ego be exposed, so that every time something adverse happens you feel it’s a negative commentary on you. And you need people to help you do that.

Dave:                And how do you, maintaining that over the years is just having discussions with these people, and having the folks in your life continually remind you of times when you were successful? Is it as simple as that?

Alan Weiss:       No, it’s more than that. I call it a personal mastery. And personal mastery occurs when you realize that a critique is valid or not valid. And it could go either way, somebody could tell you, “God, that was just horrible, what you just did.” But you realize it wasn’t. You know, people come up with their own agendas. People come up to me, some guy who says he’s a speech coach in London, comes up and says, “Would you like me to tell you how you can improve your speech?” And I said “No, get away from me.”

Alan Weiss:       On the other hand, a woman says to me, “You’re the best speaker we’ve ever had here,” and I said “No I’m not.” And she said “You’re the best speaker we’ve ever had.” I said “I’ll tell you what, tell me why.” And she said “Because you’re the only speaker we’ve ever had who could hold the microphone and walk and talk, all at the same time.” So people have these crazy kind of criteria. And so you have to know yourself, when you’re good and when you’re not so good. And you can’t rely on the feedback of other people.

Alan Weiss:       And I’ll tell you something, I believe in the one percent solution, which means if you improve my one percent a day, in 70 days you’re twice as good. It’s in all my books. And this might be the one percent for some of your listeners: Do not listen to unsolicited feedback. Solicited feedback is feedback you ask for, from people you respect. But unsolicited feedback comes from people who just decide they’re going to give you some feedback. Ignore it, it’s for the sender. And if you accept this stuff you’ll just be a ping pong ball.

Dave:                I love it. Alan, that’s fantastic advice, thank you. And I love the phrase that you use all the time, to help, I think it’s to help reinforce it, it reinforces it for me, “No guilt, no fear, no peer.” And that’s been something that I’ve had written on just about everything that I look at. I use a notebook every day to keep notes when I’m walking around, and on the first page of every notebook when I change it at the beginning of the month, I write that down to help keep my self esteem pumped up so that I realize that I am as capable as I need to be in the moment, and I need to focus on the things that I’ve done well and continue to constantly improve.

Dave:                So Alan, I know you’ve got a great new website that you’re launching right now, for 2019. You mentioned the Million Dollar Consulting Convention, what else do our listeners need to know? What’s the best way to get involved with Alan Weiss right now?

Alan Weiss:       Well there’s several ways. I think one is to attend my Million Dollar Consulting College, which I run generally once a year in Newport, Rhode Island. I take no more than twelve people or fifteen people at the most, and that’s a good way to get two and a half days of really intimate, high-powered growth and development. Another way is to enter my personal coaching program, we call it KAATN, which stands for Kick Ass And Take Names, and you work with me personally for nine months on a weekly basis, and we create assignments for you and so forth. And then I also have master mentors, and you can work with my master mentors on a six month period, and learn from them.

Alan Weiss:       So there are some easy ways to get involved, and I also have a livestream broadcast series for 2019, which you can sign up for on my site. Every month’s a different developmental behavior and trait for people. And then finally for this point you raised earlier about being well-rounded, 2019 I’m starting Alan’s Riff, it’s a once a month phone call on topics that will make you a better conversationalist, and enable you to talk to almost anyone. And again, you can sign up on Alan Weiss dot com.

Dave:                Perfect, Alan Weiss dot com is the website, and those of you who leave comments on this episode on iTunes or on any of the social media outlets, if you leave me your email address I’ll contact you, first ten people will get a copy of Alan’s book, “Million Dollar Maverick.” Please visit Alan Weiss dot com, and in any way that you possibly can, even if it’s something as simple as buying a book, or connecting with his livestream, get involved with Alan, because this is the graduate school of consulting and professional services, there’s nobody better in the business at helping you go from where you are to where you need to be.

Dave:                He’s especially valuable if you don’t know where you want to go. Because Alan can help you clear that up, and get back on track if you were successful and you want to be successful again.

Dave:                Alan Weiss, it’s been an honor to speak with you today on our inaugural episode, and until next time, we will have you come back and listen to us with another great guest on the Do This Sell More Show.

 

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About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

 

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/

Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo

Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo

Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo

 

 

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In this episode, Dave and Alan discuss: Moving beyond your own cocoon and taking in the rest of the world. Differentiating yourself as someone you and others want to know. Networking – it’s a process, not an event. In this episode, Dave and Alan discuss:<br /> <br /> Moving beyond your own cocoon and taking in the rest of the world.<br /> Differentiating yourself as someone you and others want to know.<br /> Networking – it’s a process, not an event.<br /> Creating and maintaining a healthy self-esteem when you’re an independent professional or sales executive.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Key Takeaways and actionable tips:<br /> <br /> Be well-read and well-traveled.<br /> Stop talking about your field and start talking about other things.<br /> Charge for value.<br /> Appear in the public square that makes sense to your clients frequently with new intellectual property.<br /> Do not listen to unsolicited feedback.<br /> <br /> “I focused on developing those relationships at executive levels by being able to talk on a wide variety of topics, but also by being sure that I provided them with such unique value that they started to think, ‘if I’m getting this value for free, what would I get if I hired this guy?’”   – Alan Weiss<br /> <br /> Connect with Alan Weiss<br /> <br /> Website: AlanWeiss.com<br /> <br /> Alan's New Book:  Getting Started in Consulting - 4th Edition<br /> <br /> Here is the "Behind the Scenes Video" of Dave interviewing Alan<br /> No Guilt, No Fear, No Peer - Dave Lorenzo Interviews Alan Weiss<br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Here is the transcript of the entire interview with Alan Weiss:<br /> <br /> Dave:                Welcome to the Do This Sell More Show, and this is our very first episode, and I am honored and pleased to welcome a gentleman who has been a mentor to me over the years, and to hundreds of other people. His name is Doctor Alan Weiss, and I'm going to read you a portion of his incredibly impressive bio.<br /> <br /> Dave:                Alan has attracted clients over the years such as Merck, Hewlett-Packard, GE, Mercedes Benz, State Street Corporation, The Times Mirror Group, and hundreds, hundreds of independent consultants and professional speakers. He speaks himself at 20 keynotes a year, he's one of the best keynote speakers and probably the best keynote speaker you're going to see. He's spoken at Case Western Reserve University, Boston College, Tufts Saint John's, University of Illinois, every university that has brought him in to speak, I'm sure has gotten incredible value from him. He is an inductee into the Professional Speaking Hall of Fame, he also has published over 60 books, including his bestseller, "Million Dollar Consulting."<br /> <br /> Dave:                And as a special treat to those of you who are joining us on our inaugural episode, if you're listening to this right now and you have a question or you want to mention something of value you got from Alan, I'm going to send you, as long as you send me your email address, I'm going to send you a copy of "Million Dollar Maverick," that's my favorite book that Alan's written. It's one of the over sixty that he's written, and this book is a memoir, along with Alan's tips on how to be a fantastic consultant and deliver value. It is valuable to professional service providers, it's valuable to independent sales professionals, you will get a lot out of it, you'll enjoy it, it's a quick read. So the first ten people that leave a comment on this episode will get a copy of "Million Dollar Maverick." Send me your email address and I'll get your physical address and send it to you.<br /> <br /> Dave:                Now, without further ado I want to welcome in Alan Weiss, good morning Alan.<br /> <br /> Alan Weiss:       Good morning Dave, thank you, very happy to be here for your first episode. Thanks for inviting me.<br /> <br /> Dave:                I appreciate it very much, and I was just saying before we went live that everyone else will have to live up to this standard. So those of you who are future guests, I encourage you to try and outdo the great advice Alan's goin... Dave Lorenzo clean 24:27
Welcome to Do This Sell More with Dave Lorenzo https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/04/welcome-dave-lorenzo/ Thu, 04 Apr 2019 05:00:15 +0000 https://davelorenzo.com/?p=2519 https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/04/welcome-dave-lorenzo/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2019/04/04/welcome-dave-lorenzo/feed/ 0 Make a Great Living and Live a Great Life®️ Welcome to Do This Sell More! In this podcast, you will learn how to develop more and deeper relationships to make more money and still get home on time every night. Dave introduces himself and why you should listen to this show. You can change everything and take control of your future by focusing on relationship-based sells. When you learn how to build relationships, you learn how to generate revenue on demand. This podcast is for everyone. So come join us during your Thursday lunch and you too can Do This Sell More. “Relationship-based sales can give you back control of your business and control of your life.” – Dave Lorenzo Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course   About Dave Lorenzo David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue. Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy. Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.   Connect with Dave Lorenzo Website: https://davelorenzo.com/ Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo   Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues! Make a Great Living and Live a Great Life®️

Welcome to Do This Sell More! In this podcast, you will learn how to develop more and deeper relationships to make more money and still get home on time every night. Dave introduces himself and why you should listen to this show. You can change everything and take control of your future by focusing on relationship-based sells. When you learn how to build relationships, you learn how to generate revenue on demand. This podcast is for everyone. So come join us during your Thursday lunch and you too can Do This Sell More.

“Relationship-based sales can give you back control of your business and control of your life.” Dave Lorenzo

Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course

 

About Dave Lorenzo

David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.

Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.

Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.

 

Connect with Dave Lorenzo

Website: https://davelorenzo.com/
Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo
Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo
Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo

 

Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast

Spread the wealth – rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues!

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Make a Great Living and Live a Great Life®️ - Welcome to Do This Sell More! In this podcast, you will learn how to develop more and deeper relationships to make more money and still get home on time every night. Make a Great Living and Live a Great Life®️<br /> <br /> Welcome to Do This Sell More! In this podcast, you will learn how to develop more and deeper relationships to make more money and still get home on time every night. Dave introduces himself and why you should listen to this show. You can change everything and take control of your future by focusing on relationship-based sells. When you learn how to build relationships, you learn how to generate revenue on demand. This podcast is for everyone. So come join us during your Thursday lunch and you too can Do This Sell More.<br /> <br /> “Relationship-based sales can give you back control of your business and control of your life.” – Dave Lorenzo<br /> <br /> Sign up for the Do This, Sell More Course<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> About Dave Lorenzo<br /> <br /> David Lorenzo is a sales expert, business strategy consultant, and author who has built five successful businesses during the past 25 years. Some of his most impressive ventures include taking a corporate housing company from start-up to over $50 million in annual revenue and leading a professional services firm from start-up to over $250 million in revenue.<br /> <br /> Dave does three things: He works with business leaders to develop sales strategy and drive revenue growth. He develops and delivers speeches and training programs that increase sales. He coaches entrepreneurs, sales executives, and professionals on relationship-based sales strategy.<br /> <br /> Dave received his MBA from Pace University. He also holds a Masters’ of Science in Strategic Communications from Columbia University in New York City.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Connect with Dave Lorenzo<br /> <br /> Website: https://davelorenzo.com/<br /> Twitter: @TheDaveLorenzo<br /> Instagram: @TheDaveLorenzo<br /> Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDaveLorenzo/<br /> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thedavelorenzo<br /> Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/DaveLorenzo<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Subscribe to the Do This, Sell More Podcast<br /> <br /> Spread the wealth - rate, review and share this with your friends and colleagues! Dave Lorenzo clean 4:40
How to Get Ready for a New Year https://davelorenzo.com/2016/12/14/ready-new-year/ Wed, 14 Dec 2016 17:00:35 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=1199 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/12/14/ready-new-year/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/12/14/ready-new-year/feed/ 0 How to Get Ready for a New Year This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is all about how to get for a New Year. If you want to make sure you are on track to make the upcoming year your best, this is the show for you. Listen now and follow along with the transcript below. How to Get Ready for a New Year Dave Lorenzo: Hey everyone, welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo. With us as always we have Nancy Pop. Hey Nancy, how are you? Nancy Pop:      I'm good, how are you doing? Dave Lorenzo: I'm doing great. Are you ready for 2017? Are you ready to go? Nancy Pop:      I am so pumped and ready. Dave Lorenzo: Ah! Well, as we record this, there are just 20 days left, a little bit more maybe 21 days left in 2016. You're listening to this now we've got two weeks left. You probably got less than five or six work days left to get ready for 2017. We're going to help you do that today. I will tell you that I am the perfect guys to cover this topic and here's why. Earlier this year, we had the threat of a hurricane where I live in Miami. All my relatives came over my house. In fact, my wife's family came over so we had 12 people, I think actually 13 people, and two dogs in my house for two days because this thing took forever to get anywhere close to us. Thankfully, it was a near miss because the storm had a 140 mile an hour winds. It was a little over 92, 93 miles off of the coast of Florida. One twist or turn and we could have had a category, I think it was four, storm hit us which would have been huge. It would have been catastrophic. I tell you this because my home was the place to be. We were all shuttered, we were boarded up, we were completely prepared, and when my wife's uncle said to me, "Man! How long did it take you to get ready for this?" I said to him, "Ten years." The reason I said 10 years is because I've lived in Florida for 10 years and every year, I go through on June 1, which is the beginning of hurricane season, I go through and I check all my hurricane supplies. I check the batteries. In fact, I replace the batteries in, we have six lanterns we use. Every bedroom has its own light when there's no power. We have ways to, not only cook, but we had bottled water enough for two weeks for 13 people, so I had a huge amount of bottled water on hand. I'm just a very prepared person. In fact, today, one of the things I did when I first purchased my car is we, here at my house, we have a fleet of cars. The two cars that my family uses and oftentimes, we will have the two cars that my sister-in-law and her oldest daughter use and my mother-in-law's car and I'd take care of the maintenance on all of them, and one of the things I realized was that I hadn't checked the jack and the tire changing equipment in my car or my wife's car in the last two years. I haven't checked in since we bought the car. I went out and I did that. I actually put everything together, I pulled the wheel on each car just to make sure I knew how to do it because I don't want to have to learn how to do something in a pinch. I don't want to have to learn to do it in an emergency. That's how prepared I am. In our cars, we have fire extinguishers. In my home, on each floor, I have a fire extinguisher. In my garage, I have a fire extinguisher. I am prepared. You as a business owner or a business leader, or a sales professional, need to be prepared at all times as well. When you walk in front of a client and a client asks you a question, that's the not the first time you've ever heard that question. I went out of my driveway, jacked up my cars, put together all the ... one of the cars in particular you got to crank down the spare tire. It's under, it's a big SUV, it's under the car. You have to put together the crank and crank it down. I don't want to be doing that on the side of the Florida turn pike at 2:00 in the morning for the first time. I want to know that I can do it and that I've done it befor... How to Get Ready for a New Year

This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is all about how to get for a New Year.

If you want to make sure you are on track to make the upcoming year your best, this is the show for you.

Listen now and follow along with the transcript below.

How to Get Ready for a New Year

Dave Lorenzo:

Hey everyone, welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo. With us as always we have Nancy Pop. Hey Nancy, how are you?

Nancy Pop:      I’m good, how are you doing?

Dave Lorenzo: I’m doing great. Are you ready for 2017? Are you ready to go?

Nancy Pop:      I am so pumped and ready.

Dave Lorenzo:

Ah! Well, as we record this, there are just 20 days left, a little bit more maybe 21 days left in 2016. You’re listening to this now we’ve got two weeks left. You probably got less than five or six work days left to get ready for 2017. We’re going to help you do that today. I will tell you that I am the perfect guys to cover this topic and here’s why.

Earlier this year, we had the threat of a hurricane where I live in Miami. All my relatives came over my house. In fact, my wife’s family came over so we had 12 people, I think actually 13 people, and two dogs in my house for two days because this thing took forever to get anywhere close to us. Thankfully, it was a near miss because the storm had a 140 mile an hour winds. It was a little over 92, 93 miles off of the coast of Florida. One twist or turn and we could have had a category, I think it was four, storm hit us which would have been huge. It would have been catastrophic.

I tell you this because my home was the place to be. We were all shuttered, we were boarded up, we were completely prepared, and when my wife’s uncle said to me, “Man! How long did it take you to get ready for this?” I said to him, “Ten years.” The reason I said 10 years is because I’ve lived in Florida for 10 years and every year, I go through on June 1, which is the beginning of hurricane season, I go through and I check all my hurricane supplies. I check the batteries. In fact, I replace the batteries in, we have six lanterns we use. Every bedroom has its own light when there’s no power. We have ways to, not only cook, but we had bottled water enough for two weeks for 13 people, so I had a huge amount of bottled water on hand. I’m just a very prepared person.

In fact, today, one of the things I did when I first purchased my car is we, here at my house, we have a fleet of cars. The two cars that my family uses and oftentimes, we will have the two cars that my sister-in-law and her oldest daughter use and my mother-in-law’s car and I’d take care of the maintenance on all of them, and one of the things I realized was that I hadn’t checked the jack and the tire changing equipment in my car or my wife’s car in the last two years. I haven’t checked in since we bought the car.

I went out and I did that. I actually put everything together, I pulled the wheel on each car just to make sure I knew how to do it because I don’t want to have to learn how to do something in a pinch. I don’t want to have to learn to do it in an emergency. That’s how prepared I am. In our cars, we have fire extinguishers. In my home, on each floor, I have a fire extinguisher. In my garage, I have a fire extinguisher. I am prepared.

You as a business owner or a business leader, or a sales professional, need to be prepared at all times as well. When you walk in front of a client and a client asks you a question, that’s the not the first time you’ve ever heard that question. I went out of my driveway, jacked up my cars, put together all the … one of the cars in particular you got to crank down the spare tire. It’s under, it’s a big SUV, it’s under the car. You have to put together the crank and crank it down. I don’t want to be doing that on the side of the Florida turn pike at 2:00 in the morning for the first time. I want to know that I can do it and that I’ve done it before, and I want to know exactly how to do it.

When you’re in front of a sales prospect, you don’t want to think about answering a question that’s difficult for the first time. You want to be prepared for that. What do you do? You make lists of all the possible questions that could come up and you answer them in advance. That’s what professionals do. If you want to be prepared, that’s what you need to do, you need to get ready for each sales appointment, and as we head into a new year, you need to be ready for 2017.

Last night, I gave a terrific speech to a group of insurance executives. It was a little unusual. We were at a sports bar. There was alcohol being served. The more drinks they had, the funnier I was. It was a great, great event because I went on, an hour after, a speaker on insurance went on. I love insurance, I have a lot of insurance but a speaker on insurance sent people running in droves to the bar. By the time I went on, I was the funniest person in the room.

I talked about being prepared for 2017. One of the things that came up, one of the biggest issues that business folks have, business leaders, people who sell have is, dealing with the uncertainty they face in a new year, with a brand new presidential administration, and, if you’re listening to this in the United States, in a divided country.

What can you expect for 2017? The answer is nobody knows. We can’t give you a good answer. Here’s what you’re going to do. I’m going to give you five things to do, five things to focus on in 2017 so that you can be prepared and you can ensure that you’ll be successful. Number one, I want you to create a set of daily basics, create a set of daily habits, and I want you to stick to them. Give you an example.

One of the best habits that you can have is to get up early in the morning and do some form of exercise, whether it’s walking or something even more stimulating or with higher impact like running or going to the gym and working out. The reason that exercise is so important, and this I’m going to credit to a gentleman by the name of Charles Duhig, DUHIG, he wrote a book called, “The Power of Habit”, exercise is what they call a keystone habit. It’s one of the habits that influences your behavior in areas well beyond its specific focus.

If you exercise every day, there’s a very good chance, a high likelihood, that you will eat better. There’s a high likelihood that you will watch what you intake, your quantity of alcohol and sugar. There’s a very good chance that you will be focused on overall fitness if you start your day by exercising. I want you to create your own keystone habit in your business.

For example, one of my keystone habits is I start off every day by writing something. I sit and I write for 45 minutes, sometimes even a little bit longer, sometimes an hour. It could be writing the content for this show, it could be writing an article to go up on DaveLorenzo.com, it could be writing an article for a trade journal, or writing a chapter in one of my books. I write every day for 45 minutes to an hour. That clears my head, it focuses my thinking, and it makes me more productive because I’ve already got some mental gymnastics going. I’ve already got my mind primed for everything else to happen in the day that follows.

Create your own keystone habit. It could be something as simple as calling a client when you first get in the office, call one of your most important clients every day. It could be something as simple as sitting down and writing a thank you note to someone who has done business with you. Create a set of daily basics, a set of daily habits, starting with a keystone habit, something that has an impact on the rest of your day, and do it first thing in the morning.

The second thing I want you to do to get yourself ready for the uncertainty in 2017, I want you to go out as a business leader, an entrepreneur or a sales pro, I want you to go out and each week, connect with a new banker, with a new CPA, and with a new attorney. I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking to yourself, “Dave, listen. I sell medical devices. I don’t have any use for a banker. I don’t need to know a CPA other than the person who does my taxes. Honestly, attorney’s I try to avoid them because if I’m getting involved with an attorney, that means that something’s going on. Either somebody is suing me or I’m getting divorced or something bad is happening so I try to avoid those people.” That’s what you’re thinking right now. I know that.

Here’s the reason why I want you to go out and meet one of these people each week. We develop relationships, we build our book of business, we build our sales, we grow our sales by developing relationships, and we develop relationships by solving problems. In 2017, people are not going to know what the tax code is going to look like. The tax code is going to change. If you sell to folks who are concerned about taxes, for example, if you sell to the affluent, they’re going to want to know what’s going on with tax policy. Another thing that’s going to change, laws are going to change left and right. The new administration is going to come in. They’re going to revoke a lot of the old laws that were put in place, particularly those that were done by Executive Order, and there’s going to be a lot of talk about the changes in the law that the new administration is going to push.

The third thing is business regulations are going to change. Baking regulations are going to change. Banks are going to be able to … they’re going to have more freedom. It’s going to be like the wild west. They’re going to be able to do whatever they want. Stop short of being able to do whatever they want but they will have more freedom to operate and new and exotic banking products will be developed. You can count on that.

I want you to go out and I want you to meet a banker, a CPA and an attorney each week because I want you to have people in your stable. I want you to have people in your book that you can refer your clients to when they have problems or when they have questions. Remember, you initiate relationships by going to people and talking to them about what’s going on in their lives, by going to them and asking them what’s keeping them awake at night, by helping them solve problems even if the problems have nothing to do with your area of expertise.

These people, a banker, a CPA, and an attorney are critical because the changes that are coming, the uncertainty that’s going to exist is going to exist in the world of banking regulations, in the world of tax policy, and in the world of changes in the law. You don’t need to know anything about these changes yourself, you just need to know the right people to connect your clients to when they have questions. Each week, in 2017, I want you to go out and meet a banker, a CPA, and an attorney.

By the way, just so you know, bankers, CPAs, and attorneys work with lots of business owners. They work with lots of people in powerful positions. They work with lots of people who are influential. Bankers, CPAs, and attorneys are fantastic for any sales professional to know because they can refer people and they understand the currency of referrals. If you want more referrals, and who doesn’t? That’s the best way to grow your business. If you want more referrals, you can invest your time in no better place than meeting with a banker, a CPA and an attorney each and every week.

Number three, I want you to create an action journal or an action log, you can call it whatever you want. Throw away your to-do list, come up with just three priorities everyday. You can remember three, it’s very easy, you can keep three things in your head. Do three things each day and I want you to create an action journal and write down each what you’ve accomplished. Do it at the end of the day, before you go to bed. You can do it at the end of the day before you leave the office. I do it in Evernote. If you’ve ever seen Evernote, it’s a program on the computer, it’s an app. You can use it on your phone. I use the date as a title and I just write down what I’ve accomplished at the end of the day.

Why do I do this? I do it because it makes me feel good about myself. When you list your accomplishments, I want you to list your accomplishments not only in the area that you work in but I want you to list accomplishments as a father, as a brother, as a sister. You play many different roles. You’re a business owner, you’re a father, a mother, a sister, or a brother. All the roles that you work in, all the roles that you have in your life, if you’ve accomplished something in that area during the course of the day, I want you to write it down. I want you to list the things that you’ve accomplished. You spent an hour and a half teaching your kid how to hit a curve ball? Write that down. That’s important. That’s probably one of the most important things you can down, spend time with someone you care about.

At the end of a week, you’ll review your action journal form each day and you’ll be amazed at how much you’ve accomplished. Contrast this with keeping a to-do list and leaving the office with 50 things not checked off? You leave the office and you feel guilty when you have things on your to-do list that aren’t done. But, when you put your head on the pillow at the end of the night and you have 50 things on your list that have been accomplished, you feel fantastic.

Number four, honesty, transparency, and preparation demonstrate your ability as a professional and they will be at a premium in 2017. Honesty, transparency and preparation, why is this going to come to the forefront? If you look at what’s being talked about in the media right now, this is December, it’s the middle of December 2016, everybody’s talking about the Presidential transition and everyone’s talking about the lack of preparation. Everyone’s talking about the promises that have been made to win this election. There’s an article on the Washington Post published a couple of weeks ago. The President-elect of the United States of America has made 287 campaign promises, some of them are in direct contradiction with one another. Regardless of you political beliefs, you have to understand that that’s a problem because, obviously, if some of the promises are contradictory, they’re not going to be kept, some of them anyway.

Transparency is non-existent right now. The President-elect hasn’t had a press conference since the middle of June. His opponent didn’t have a press conference, had one press conference pretty much during her entire campaign. Transparency doesn’t exist in politics. I think that’s going to come to a head and people will place a premium on honesty, transparency and preparation because all they see in the world around them on TV is dishonesty, lack of transparency, and flying by the seat of one’s pants, proverbially.

I want you to focus your efforts on being honest, not only direct honesty, telling the truth, but I want you to be honest in what you choose to talk about versus omission. Sometimes you don’t lie because you don’t say anything but you know that by saying something you would have prevented something else from happening. That’s called an error of omission or being dishonest by omission. I want you to avoid that. I want you to be completely transparent in everything you do particularly with your clients and your employees. I want you to be prepared just like I’m preparing my jack in my car, I’m preparing for disaster with hurricanes, having fire extinguishers around, because preparation, honesty and transparency will be at a premium in 2017 and beyond. You can count on it because all you’re going to see in the media is the exact opposite. People will go out of their way to do business with folks who they believe are honest, transparent and prepared. Mark it down now and make it the cornerstone of your work in 2017.

Finally, I want you to be the voice of reason. There’s so much negativity out there. It’s so easy to pick a fight with someone these days because our country is divided. It’s so easy to pick a fight with someone because all you see on social media are people going back and forth at each other as if their lives and their income depended on the opinions they hold particularly related to politics. I don’t want you to be one of those people because people do business with people they know, like, and trust. If you’re out there picking fights with people or jumping down everyone’s throat when people don’t agree with you, no one will want to do business with you. No one.

Here’s what I want you to do. When you disagree with someone, when they say something you disagree with, I want you to say to the person, “That’s interesting. What makes you feel that way?” That’s what I want you to say. Regardless of how stupid or how ridiculous what they say is, I want you to say, “That’s interesting. What makes you feel that way?” That is you opening up and showing empathy toward the other person. You’re not saying you agree with their point of view. You’re saying that their point of view is something you want to understand. As humans, that’s what we strive for. We strive to be understood, that’s what we want.

Instead of jumping down someone’s throat, instead of getting into an argument, instead of really going nuts on someone on social media or in person, I want you to just say, “That’s interesting. What makes you feel that way?” Let them open up and tell you, and at that point, if you want to change the subject, you can change the subject. But what you’ve done is you’ve shown kindness, you’ve shown empathy, and you’ve shown a willingness to listen and that’s what will make people want to be around you. Do not be a part of the problem, be the voice of reason.

Let me recap for you, the five things I want you to do to get ready for 2017. Number one, you’re going to create a set of daily basics. You’re going to start with a keystone habit and create some daily habits and you’re going to stick with them for all of 2017. Number two, each week, you’re going to go out and meet a new banker, a new CPA, and a new attorney. Why? Because things are changing and these people will have the answers to the questions that are top of mind for your clients. You need to be able to help your clients in these areas when they have a problem and you help them by connecting them with a banker, a CPA, or an attorney. Your clients will appreciate it, and the banker, the CPA, the attorney will appreciate it because they’re connecting you with people to refer to you because you’re helping them.

Number three, you’re going to keep an action log or an action journal instead of doing a to-do list. Why? Because it shows how much you actually get done, it boosts your confidence, it helps your self-esteem, and it makes you focus on the positive things in your life. Number four, you’re going to act with honesty, transparency and you’re going to be prepared because the whole world around us will not be honest, it will not be transparent, and people will not be prepared. That will be the dominant focus of the news, how people are not prepared, particularly at the highest levels of government, how dishonest people are, particularly at the highest levels of government, and how opaque people have become, particularly at the highest levels of government. Your honesty, your transparency and your preparation will make you someone people want to be around.

Finally, you’re going to be the voice or reason, you’re not going to start fights, you’re going to be open and say to people who say things that are stupid or ridiculous, “Hmm, That’s interesting. What makes you feel that way?” Then you’re going to let them say whatever they need to say, you’ll be empathetic, you’ll be warm, and you’ll be welcoming, and you will be different than 90% of the population who is acting in the exact opposite way.

My friends, do not fear 2017, embrace it. It’s going to be a fantastic year for you. It’s going to be a fantastic year for all of us. With these five points, you are well-armed to march into 2017. Until next week, I’m Dave Lorenzo and I hope you, this week, every week, and into 2017, make a great living and live a great life.

 

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How to Get Ready for a New Year This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is all about how to get for a New Year. If you want to make sure you are on track to make the upcoming year your best, this is the show for you. How to Get Ready for a New Year<br /> <br /> This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is all about how to get for a New Year.<br /> <br /> If you want to make sure you are on track to make the upcoming year your best, this is the show for you.<br /> <br /> Listen now and follow along with the transcript below.<br /> How to Get Ready for a New Year<br /> Dave Lorenzo: <br /> <br /> Hey everyone, welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo. With us as always we have Nancy Pop. Hey Nancy, how are you?<br /> <br /> Nancy Pop:      I'm good, how are you doing?<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo: I'm doing great. Are you ready for 2017? Are you ready to go?<br /> <br /> Nancy Pop:      I am so pumped and ready.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo: <br /> <br /> Ah! Well, as we record this, there are just 20 days left, a little bit more maybe 21 days left in 2016. You're listening to this now we've got two weeks left. You probably got less than five or six work days left to get ready for 2017. We're going to help you do that today. I will tell you that I am the perfect guys to cover this topic and here's why.<br /> <br /> Earlier this year, we had the threat of a hurricane where I live in Miami. All my relatives came over my house. In fact, my wife's family came over so we had 12 people, I think actually 13 people, and two dogs in my house for two days because this thing took forever to get anywhere close to us. Thankfully, it was a near miss because the storm had a 140 mile an hour winds. It was a little over 92, 93 miles off of the coast of Florida. One twist or turn and we could have had a category, I think it was four, storm hit us which would have been huge. It would have been catastrophic.<br /> <br /> I tell you this because my home was the place to be. We were all shuttered, we were boarded up, we were completely prepared, and when my wife's uncle said to me, "Man! How long did it take you to get ready for this?" I said to him, "Ten years." The reason I said 10 years is because I've lived in Florida for 10 years and every year, I go through on June 1, which is the beginning of hurricane season, I go through and I check all my hurricane supplies. I check the batteries. In fact, I replace the batteries in, we have six lanterns we use. Every bedroom has its own light when there's no power. We have ways to, not only cook, but we had bottled water enough for two weeks for 13 people, so I had a huge amount of bottled water on hand. I'm just a very prepared person.<br /> <br /> In fact, today, one of the things I did when I first purchased my car is we, here at my house, we have a fleet of cars. The two cars that my family uses and oftentimes, we will have the two cars that my sister-in-law and her oldest daughter use and my mother-in-law's car and I'd take care of the maintenance on all of them, and one of the things I realized was that I hadn't checked the jack and the tire changing equipment in my car or my wife's car in the last two years. I haven't checked in since we bought the car.<br /> <br /> I went out and I did that. I actually put everything together, I pulled the wheel on each car just to make sure I knew how to do it because I don't want to have to learn how to do something in a pinch. I don't want to have to learn to do it in an emergency. That's how prepared I am. In our cars, we have fire extinguishers. In my home, on each floor, I have a fire extinguisher. In my garage, I have a fire extinguisher. I am prepared.<br /> <br /> You as a business owner or a business leader, or a sales professional, need to be prepared at all times as well. When you walk in front of a client and a client asks you a question, that's the not the first time you've ever heard that question. I went out of my driveway, jacked up my cars, put together all the ... one of the cars in particular you got to crank down the spare tire. It's under, it's a big SUV, it's under the car. Dave Lorenzo clean 23:35
How To Sell In A Regulated Environment https://davelorenzo.com/2016/12/07/sell-regulated-environment/ Wed, 07 Dec 2016 18:00:45 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=1170 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/12/07/sell-regulated-environment/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/12/07/sell-regulated-environment/feed/ 0 How to Sell In a Regulated Environment Do you sell a product or service under strict scrutiny by the government? Are you looking to make progress in the healthcare, medical or dental industry? Isn't it frustrating working with a long sales cycle? Selling in a regulated environment is a challenge but it doesn't have to be. On this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we speak with Leila Chang the CEO of Florida Dental Benefits.  Leila helps us cut through the red tape and close the deal in a highly regulated industry. Dave Lorenzo:                       Hi there, Workplace Warriors. I'm Dave Lorenzo. You've only got 60 seconds to make a first impression and I've got half that time to convince you to come with me to the place to be. It's the place you know that will make your wallet grow. It is the 60 Second Sale Show. Welcome, everyone, to the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo, and today we've got something really special for you. Today, we have an inside look at how to sell in a regulated industry. I know many of you out there are concerned because we've been helping you develop relationships. We've been helping you build and grow your book of business, and you're focused on developing relationships, but you tell me, I hear all the time, I get emails, I get phone calls, I get text messages, I get shout-outs on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, "Dave, look. This is all great and I have great relationships with my buyers but I'm in a regulated industry. I have no choice. I have to answer an RFP. What do I do?" I heard you and we're answering that today. I have the best expert on the planet or at least the best expert I could find to answer this for you, my good friend Leila Chang. She's the CEO of Florida Dental Benefits. She's out there right now, her staff ... She's out there pounding the pavement. Her staff, her sales team, they're out there pounding the pavement every day looking to help the toothless population of Florida and she's going to teach us how to sell in a regulated industry. At least, she's going to give us some insight. She's going to give us a window into how you can break through if you have to follow an RFP process or if you're in a competitive industry or if you're in an industry that is ridiculously overregulated, this is the show for you. Now, I don't want you to tune out if you're not in a regulated industry because we've got all sorts of great stuff for you today. We're going to talk about the experience you provide to your clients. We're going to talk about that right now, but before I get into that, I'd be remiss if I didn't welcome in my partner in crime, the person who makes all this happen, the wonderful, the talented producer of this show, Nancy Pop. Hello Nancy, how are you today? Nancy Pop:                          Hello, Dave. I am just not getting out of bed from Thanksgiving. How about you? Dave Lorenzo:                       You know, it's funny. I'm sure there are a lot of people out there who are ... They're gonna listen to this show probably seven days from now or even into the future, and they're gonna be like, "Thanksgiving? What are you talking about? It's sunny, I'm at the beach, I'm listening to this podcast," and that's fine, but as we're recording this show today, it's one week from Thanksgiving, seven full days. It'll be seven full days tomorrow. I didn't really have the tryptophan coma this year. I did fry the turkey. If you listen to last week's show, we had my friend, Enrique Fernandez on the show last week and in addition to being an expert on developing systems, he also gave us some thoughts on how to fry a turkey. His insight was really, really good. I used a couple of his tips when I fried my own turkey on Thanksgiving. I think it came out pretty well. I'm gonna do another one next week. We have another group of people. As many of you know, those of you who have been listeners for a while, we here in the Lorenzo house have a bed and breakfast that open... How to Sell In a Regulated Environment

Do you sell a product or service under strict scrutiny by the government?

Are you looking to make progress in the healthcare, medical or dental industry?

Isn’t it frustrating working with a long sales cycle?

Selling in a regulated environment is a challenge but it doesn’t have to be.

On this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we speak with Leila Chang the CEO of Florida Dental Benefits.  Leila helps us cut through the red tape and close the deal in a highly regulated industry.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Hi there, Workplace Warriors. I’m Dave Lorenzo. You’ve only got 60 seconds to make a first impression and I’ve got half that time to convince you to come with me to the place to be. It’s the place you know that will make your wallet grow. It is the 60 Second Sale Show. Welcome, everyone, to the 60 Second Sale Show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo, and today we’ve got something really special for you. Today, we have an inside look at how to sell in a regulated industry. I know many of you out there are concerned because we’ve been helping you develop relationships. We’ve been helping you build and grow your book of business, and you’re focused on developing relationships, but you tell me, I hear all the time, I get emails, I get phone calls, I get text messages, I get shout-outs on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, “Dave, look. This is all great and I have great relationships with my buyers but I’m in a regulated industry. I have no choice. I have to answer an RFP. What do I do?”

I heard you and we’re answering that today. I have the best expert on the planet or at least the best expert I could find to answer this for you, my good friend Leila Chang. She’s the CEO of Florida Dental Benefits. She’s out there right now, her staff … She’s out there pounding the pavement. Her staff, her sales team, they’re out there pounding the pavement every day looking to help the toothless population of Florida and she’s going to teach us how to sell in a regulated industry. At least, she’s going to give us some insight. She’s going to give us a window into how you can break through if you have to follow an RFP process or if you’re in a competitive industry or if you’re in an industry that is ridiculously overregulated, this is the show for you. Now, I don’t want you to tune out if you’re not in a regulated industry because we’ve got all sorts of great stuff for you today. We’re going to talk about the experience you provide to your clients. We’re going to talk about that right now, but before I get into that, I’d be remiss if I didn’t welcome in my partner in crime, the person who makes all this happen, the wonderful, the talented producer of this show, Nancy Pop. Hello Nancy, how are you today?

Nancy Pop:                          Hello, Dave. I am just not getting out of bed from Thanksgiving. How about you?

Dave Lorenzo:                       You know, it’s funny. I’m sure there are a lot of people out there who are … They’re gonna listen to this show probably seven days from now or even into the future, and they’re gonna be like, “Thanksgiving? What are you talking about? It’s sunny, I’m at the beach, I’m listening to this podcast,” and that’s fine, but as we’re recording this show today, it’s one week from Thanksgiving, seven full days. It’ll be seven full days tomorrow. I didn’t really have the tryptophan coma this year. I did fry the turkey. If you listen to last week’s show, we had my friend, Enrique Fernandez on the show last week and in addition to being an expert on developing systems, he also gave us some thoughts on how to fry a turkey. His insight was really, really good. I used a couple of his tips when I fried my own turkey on Thanksgiving. I think it came out pretty well. I’m gonna do another one next week. We have another group of people.

As many of you know, those of you who have been listeners for a while, we here in the Lorenzo house have a bed and breakfast that opens a couple of days before Thanksgiving and it closes a couple weeks after Thanksgiving. We have people just rolling in and rolling out, my wife’s family mostly. Last week, it was my family. So we cook extravagant meals from week to week. Next week, I’m gonna do another turkey and I’m gonna use what I learned in my Thanksgiving turkey fry and I’m gonna make the turkey even better. Those of you who missed it, you didn’t catch the turkey that I fried, you can go to Instagram, @thedavelorenzo on Instagram, and check out me pulling the beautiful, they say it was a 25-pound turkey. I think it cooked a little faster than that. I think it was probably more like 20 pounds. Maybe it was 25 pounds with all the guts inside before we took ’em out, but it’s a beautiful 20-pound bird. You can go look at it on Instagram. You can marvel at my capability as a fry cook. It worked out very, very well. My house didn’t burn down and everybody had a good time. So that was great.

Let’s talk about the experience that you provide now. As an entrepreneur, as a business leader, as a sales professional, there’s three things we provide our customers. We can provide our customers with a product, we can provide our customers with a service, we can provide our customers with an experience. Some of us provide all three, some of us just provide a service and the experience, some of us just provide a product and an experience but what we always forget about is the experience. My friends, this is where your competitive advantage really lies. You as a sales professional can create a competitive advantage with the experience you provide. Let me give you an example. Nancy traveled to Erie, Pennsylvania for her Thanksgiving and I’m sure that was a fantastic trip. How was your trip to Erie, Nancy?

Nancy Pop:                          One speeding ticket later, I’m safe and sound back in New York, and that’s all I have to say about that.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Oh, speeding ticket. New York state speeding ticket or a Pennsylvania-

Nancy Pop:                          Pennsylvania.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Oh, Pennsylvania. Wow.

Nancy Pop:                          Now I have to go all the way back to go to court if I do that.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Well, you could just plead guilty. How fast were you going?

Nancy Pop:                          I was just going 80 on a 70 mile per hour highway. It wasn’t even hailing yet.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Here’s the thing. How much is the fine?

Nancy Pop:                          $150, not that bad.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Don’t go. Don’t go.

Nancy Pop:                          Yeah.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Save up, pay the $150. Where was the ticket? What was the township of the ticket?

Nancy Pop:                          I was somewhere in central Pennsylvania, like in the boondocks somewhere.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Okay. Yeah, it’s not worth it.

Nancy Pop:                          Yeah.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Save up your money and just send in the $150 and be done with it. It’s not worth a trip. You’ll plead it down and what are you gonna pay, $75 plus court costs? You’re gonna save yourself $50, and then to drive to central Pennsylvania-

Nancy Pop:                          Even then, it’s gonna cost me.

Dave Lorenzo:                       I love Pennsylvania, but the drive through Pennsylvania in the winter time, to me, it’s not worth $150.

Nancy Pop:                          Exactly.

Dave Lorenzo:                       So I had an experience over Thanksgiving. My family was here, we were having a great time. My son’s birthday is a couple days before Thanksgiving. It’s between Thanksgiving and my son’s birthday and we’re all sitting around the table reminiscing, and my father gets a phone call. Unfortunately, my uncle passed away. So we ended up having to fly out, my mother, my father, and I. My parents were gonna stay an extra week. We ended up having to fly out back to New York. They had to flight out back to New York, I had to fly out with them for the services, and to pay our respects, and to comfort some family members, and for me, it was gonna be a quick trip because we had a ton of people here in the house and I didn’t want to leave my wife alone to have to deal with all of them. I flew up with them on Friday and I flew back on Saturday. The services were Friday night and Saturday morning and I was able to get all that in in 24 hours.

We fly up and back on American Airlines, and if you live in Miami, you know that American Airlines has an absolute stranglehold on the gates here at Miami International Airport. Thanksgiving weekend, the only flight we could get out of Miami into JFK, go up without incident, we’re coming back, and I go to the airport. It’s immediately after the funeral. I come right from the cemetery. I’m in a suit, I need to change, and I’m tired. I’m just kind of out of it. I said, “I’m gonna go to the Admiral’s Club. I’ll get a day pass.” That’s the American Airlines lounge. I’ll get a day pass and I’ll have to pay whatever I have to pay. At least I can change in a clean facility, and I can get a drink, and there’s wifi there. It’s free, it’s included, it’s fine.

I go and I approach the podium, and the woman says, “Hi, how are you?” I say, “I’m great.” She says, “Really? You’re great?” This is Concourse B, JFK. I say, “Yeah, I’m absolutely great. I’m going home and I’m thrilled to be going home.” So she says, “Hm,” and she types in the computer. She’s like, “First class to Miami?” I was flying first class. She said, “That doesn’t get you the lounge.” I said, “I know. I want to buy a day pass. I’m happy to do it.” I took out my credit card. She said, “Nope, no day passes. Lounge is under construction.” I just looked at her. I said, “Okay.” I kind of sighed and I put my wallet back in my pocket, and as I turn to walk away she looked at me and she smirked and she said, “I guess you’re not great now.” I was shocked. I was absolutely shocked that someone would say that to me. As a premium passenger, I paid first class prices for the ticket and the experience provided to me by American Airlines, and this incident in this instance was just absolutely awful. This is why I avoid flying American Airlines whenever I can.

The lesson here, the thing that I want to impart on you, the reason that I tell you this story today is because I want you to understand that when you are out there, everything you do from your first point of contact with your client, or your prospective client, or your referral source, everything you do, everything you do affects the experience the person with whom you’re interacting has with you, everything you do. Along the way, if you’re cold calling, you’re breaking down that door, you’re kicking in that door, if you call 15 times and you hang up and the caller ID has your name on it or the caller ID has your phone number on it, that person’s gonna know you’re calling 15 times and hanging up. If you’re sending 30 emails, that person’s gonna know you’ve sent 30 emails. Maybe that’s what you’re going for? Maybe you’re going for persistence, that’s fine, but if you’re pushing your way in, that’s the first impression. That’s the way you’re starting your experience with your customer.

The way we do things around here, our system, The 60 Second Sale system is about love at first sight for business. It’s about how we develop relationships with our prospective clients. When you go out and you look to initiate that interaction, are you doing so by extending value to that potential client or are you doing so with your own best interests in mind and pushing your way in? Think about the experience you’re creating. Think about the competitive advantage you want for yourself as a sales professional, as an entrepreneur, as a business leader. The experience you provide is everything. That’s your competitive advantage. When you’re selling, if you lead with value, if you lead thinking about the best interest of the other person, you’re creating a tremendous competitive advantage that other people will not be able to replicate because the experience you provide is unique to you. I’m gonna say that again. The experience you provide to someone else, the experience you provide to your client, is unique. No one else can replicate that because you’re you.

It’s a snowflake. Remember that? Everybody used to say when you were in grammar school, “Everybody’s like a snowflake. No two people are alike.” Your grammar school teacher used to say that to you. Fine, great. Let’s use that then. The experience you provide is like a snowflake. It’s like a beautiful gentle snowflake falling on your eyelashes. Perfect for the winter time, right? You are providing something unique, something different, and that’s your goal. Think about that on your approach when you sell and now, let’s think about the unique nature, the snowflake-like nature of selling in a regulated industry. How is that for a clumsy segue? Nancy, do me a favor. Read the marvelously impressive bio of our guest today and then we can get into a really interesting conversation with one of my favorite people.

Nancy Pop:                          So today, we have the marvelous Leila Chang. She is the CEO of Florida Dental Benefits, a dental benefits company headquartered in Miami Beach, Florida. Leila started her career in healthcare in 1988 working for a south Florida HMO. Leila has worked in all aspects for the dental benefits industry. Previously, Leila was a founder, investor, and CEO of Atlantic Dental Benefits, a manage dental care company in Florida. During her tenure, Atlantic Dental has returned a significant profit to investors and has grown the organization to more than 700,000 members and 2,000 dentists throughout Florida. Wow. Miss Chang is a graduate of Florida International University in Miami with a bachelor of science in computer science.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Leila Chang, welcome to the show.

Leila Chang:                           Hi, Dave.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Hey, look at that. You like that bell? That’s a new addition here.

Leila Chang:                           That’s awesome.

Dave Lorenzo:                       I don’t know how that ended up on my desk, but I figured I would ring it just for you. What’s happening, Leila? How are you today?

Leila Chang:                           I’m great. I’m great. I can’t wait to get into this.

Dave Lorenzo:                       So 700,000 members, 2,000 dentists. Let me ask you a question, Leila, and this is probably the most pressing question I’m gonna ask you, okay? Four out of five dentists surveyed recommend Trident to their patients who chew gum. What does the fifth dentist recommend? I think you need to go out to your 2,000 dentists and I need an answer to that question. Will you do that for me?

Leila Chang:                           He recommends not chewing gum. That’s what he recommends.

Dave Lorenzo:                       I don’t know what’s wrong with him. Anyway, a bunch of doctors used to smoke back in the 70s too. I don’t think they’re recommending that anymore either. Leila, here’s what I’d like you to do for us, if you don’t mind please. You have one of the greatest family stories that I’ve heard. Will you give us the two minute overview of your background and what brought you here to Miami?

Leila Chang:                           Sure. My dad was Chinese. He was born in Canton, and my mother is Cuban. My dad made his way to Cuba via the Philippines. He met my mother, and got married, and had me. When my mother was pregnant, my dad actually was able to exile himself in Guantanamo Bay to come to the United States so that he could claim us. Then we came here in 1966.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Wow. All right. Great story, and we are just a few days past a historic event. Those of you who are time shifting and listening to this at a later date, there’s no way you can possibly understand the impact on the Cuban community here in Miami as to what happened. Fidel Castro passed away just days ago. Leila, give us a sense for what that event means to the Cuban community and what it means to you personally.

Leila Chang:                           I can’t speak for the Cuban community. I can tell you what it means personally. My dad came over first, then my mom, my grandparents, and I came over shortly after. Actually, that’s not correct. I didn’t meet my dad until I was two years old, but we all lived in a little apartment, probably about 500 square feet, all five of us, and my parents, who had worked at businesses in Cuba had to come here. My mother had to work in a factory making wigs, and my dad had to work as a restaurant worker. My grandparents, who were well into their 60s, had to start working as well. My grandmother was a maid for Holiday Inn and my grandfather worked at the back of a cabaret type of show. He worked the coffee in the back. My family had to really start from scratch with nothing but what they could carry with them on the freedom flight. It was quite a struggle, but they made it happen. When people start talking about Castro and about the benefits that he brought to Cuba, it’s just difficult when you have firsthand knowledge and firsthand experience of the sacrifices that people had to make to leave the country.

Dave Lorenzo:                       I understand. Your family story is one that … It’s so important for those of us who have been blessed to be born here in the United States, those of us who really have this as our birthright, we take it for granted. These stories, anytime you have the opportunity to hear these stories or any time you have the opportunity to hear someone tell a story like this, you need to avail yourself of that opportunity because it is what makes up the fabric of our country. Stories like your family’s story remind us of how great this country is and the opportunity and what people will do in order to have this kind of opportunity, an opportunity that we, I, being born here, my kids born here, take for granted every day. We need to hear these stories as often as possible, so thank you. I appreciate you telling us this story. So how did you get to be CEO of Florida Dental Benefits? How did that happen?

Leila Chang:                           As I mentioned, I started in healthcare by mistake, actually. As Nancy mentioned, I have a computer science degree, but once I got out of college and started working in computer science, I found that I really hated it. A friend of mine was working for a local south Florida HMO selling Medicare door-to-door. She said, “This is a great opportunity. Why don’t you come work with us?” That was my first entry into healthcare, which was going door-to-door and selling Medicare products to the 65 and over community. I liked it, I liked the interaction, I liked being in healthcare, and then an opportunity came up in dental. It was a better opportunity. I didn’t have to go door-to-door, I was working in customer service, and just started, like I said, by mistake, just kind of fell into it and loved the industry. I like dental because it deals with healthcare but it doesn’t deal with all the catastrophic things that happen in medical. Like I mentioned, just kind of by mistake, and here I am.

Dave Lorenzo:                       All right. Well, we’re glad you’re here. Tell us about sales in healthcare, sales in the dental industry. What’s the process like and how difficult is it to sell? You have an enormous amount of regulations. Give us a quick overview of how tough it is to sell.

Leila Chang:                           You and I have talked about it. The sales cycle in healthcare is incredibly long. Everyone has what we call an open enrollment date. If you don’t speak to the person before the open enrollment date, you have to wait a year. Most companies renew their benefits in January or in October. If you don’t speak to them three to four months before that date, then you won’t have an opportunity in the following year. You might start a conversation with them that they might not be up for renewal that year. They might have a two or three year contract and so you’re speaking to them for two or three years before you even have an opportunity to quote on their business. It’s really about developing that relationship.

Secondly, this kind of business is pretty much controlled by the agent community. An agent will represent several lines of insurance or they might work with three or four different carriers, and they’re the ones who are presenting the information to the employers to make the decision. About 90% of the business is controlled by agents. The other-

Dave Lorenzo:                       So-

Leila Chang:                           Go ahead.

Dave Lorenzo:                       No, please. Continue.

Leila Chang:                           The other 10%, as you mentioned before, is controlled through the RFP process, the request for proposal process. That’s mostly larger employers, municipalities, and they normally go out to bid, I would say, every three to five years.

Dave Lorenzo:                       All right. So talk about the relationships. Who do you have to develop relationships with and how do you have your sales team develop relationships?

Leila Chang:                           There’s three ways that we develop relationships. The first way is we develop relationships with the agent community. An agent will control multiple employers. It’s a great way if you get a good relationship with an agent, he’ll quote you on multiple accounts. With dealing with one person, you can have access to a multitude of employers. That’s the best way. Secondly, is you can develop a relationship with the business and then they might have an agent that they work with, and then they can introduce you to the agent, and you can get in that way. The third way is the RFP process, which is normally done through a purchasing department, but again, if you wait to speak to someone, if you wait to present right before the RFP process, it doesn’t work. You have to develop the relationships way before the RFP is ever written or the RFP is ever sent out.

Dave Lorenzo:                       So if you have a good relationship with the purchasing people and the RFP process comes around, you have the opportunity to really shape the RFP, right? You can help shape the requirements and help them with crafting the way the RFP is worded. Am I correct on that?

Leila Chang:                           Exactly. Sometimes they might not realize that the way that they’re writing the RFP limits the people that can respond to it. So it’s important to have them understand that if they write it a certain way, only the, let’s say, top three or top three largest carriers will be able to respond. So they’re leaving out the local carriers. It’s important to have that conversation with them ahead of time. Again, if you’re waiting ’til the RFP is written, you’re never gonna have an opportunity.

Dave Lorenzo:                       What’s the farthest out you’ve developed relationships? In other words, how long have you waited for relationships to pay off for you?

Leila Chang:                           The longest sales cycle, I would say, is three years.

Dave Lorenzo:                       So you developed a relationship, and then you wait, and you wait, and you wait, and three years later, all of a sudden, 100,000 people jump on board?

Leila Chang:                           Exactly. Ours, we had 40,000 members, but it took three years, and this was over a relationship that I’ve had previously. So I’ve known this person for, I would say, 10 to 15 years, but they were very happy with their current carrier. We just kept the conversation going. I’d check in with them every three to four months to see how they were doing, and when they were actually thinking about going out to bid, we spoke and responded to it. Then we had follow up meetings and we were able to get the business three years later.

Dave Lorenzo:                       You said there’s three groups, right? How do you initiate new relationships with, let’s start with companies? In fact, let’s just focus on companies. You use companies, agents, and RFP process. RFP process, if you’re listening and you’re interested in learning how to develop business through an RFP process, there’s a ton of information on the website. I think I’ve done a couple of videos. We even might have done a podcast on it. That’s out there. I want to know about companies. So tell us how, Leila, you initiate a relationship with a company knowing that it could take three years?

Leila Chang:                           For example, I was just calling someone today from an automotive part company that has probably 200 to 300 employees. It’s about getting in, finding out who their HR person is. It’s about making cold calls, finding out who the right person to speak with, and then I use LinkedIn a lot. I use LinkedIn to see if there are connections that I can get to get an introduction to that person. Then it’s just about speaking to them, sending emails, following up until I am able to get information on who they have currently, what’s their effective date, so that I can put them in my tickler file and reach out to them six months before their effective date.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Give me a LinkedIn success story if you can think of one. How have you used LinkedIn to research and connect through to somebody?

Leila Chang:                           One of the big home runs for us is when we are able to get an HMO. A medical HMO will offer dental and most of the times when they’re offering dental, it’s not them offering dental, they outsource it. So they would outsource it to someone like us, like Florida Dental Benefits. I actually was prospecting on LinkedIn and the contact person on there, which was the Director of Provider Relations, I saw there was a connection with someone specifically from BNI, a business networking group that I’m a part of. I was able to contact that person, say, “Do you know this person? Could you recommend that they speak with me?” It took about three months out of the sales cycle, or at least the contact cycle because it was a warm introduction.

Dave Lorenzo:                       You went on LinkedIn and you saw the person you wanted to target, and then you looked through and saw who was a mutual connection, connected to you, connected to them, and you noticed that this person, who was in a business networking group with you, was also connected to both people. So you went to that person, you said, “Hey, I can provide significant value. Can you make an introduction to me? Here’s what I’d like to do for them.” They introduced you and they gave you a shortcut to the sales cycle by three months.

Leila Chang:                           About three months, exactly. I think it’s important to say you have to really … With LinkedIn, you might be connected with someone and they don’t know you. It’s really important to take that step to find out if that person knows them versus calling them and saying, “Oh, we have a common connection.” That doesn’t work. It’s really about doing your homework and reaching out to that middle person to make sure that they have a good relationship with the person you’re trying to contact.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Yeah, I completely agree. I find that LinkedIn, basically, is a trail of breadcrumbs that leads you home.

Leila Chang:                           Correct.

Dave Lorenzo:                       It’s not a map, it’s not the actual path, it’s clues, it’s hints. What I do with LinkedIn is I use it to figure out who the exact person is. Sure, if I have a first degree connection, I call them up and I say, “Hey, do you know this guy?” What I’ve found is nine times out of 10, they don’t know ’em and it’s just somebody who spammed them and they clicked on Yes or who is somebody who they spammed and that person clicked Yes, I’ll accept your connection, but if gives you a frame of reference. It gives you a place to start. The beauty of LinkedIn, you can upgrade your membership, but it’s free. You can connect to all these people for free and see who people know. It’s a great resource tool. Speaking of which, what other resource tools do you and your team use to find out who the ideal person is in a company?

Leila Chang:                           It’s religious trial and error. For us, the people that make the decisions are usually the CEO, an HR director, or a purchasing director, depending on how large the company is. Really, those are the three people that we’re targeting. Most of the times when you call, you’re able to get that information and those people are open to speaking with you or providing you the information, and most of them will refer you to the agent that they’re working with.

Dave Lorenzo:                       Okay, great. We have just a couple of minutes left. I want to ask you if you can remember the biggest success story you’ve had in sales, the thing that you’re most proud of in sales and selling. Tell us that story, if you can think of it.

Leila Chang:                           Hm. I think every time you close a deal is a success story. As long as I’ve been in business, it always surprises me how successful you can be if you just keep at it. You talked about persistency and you’re right, there’s a fine line between persistency and being annoying. It always surprises me. If you’re persistent, and you are professional, and you’re providing something of value, eventually, you’re going to get an opportunity. I think you were the one that said to me something about you don’t end the sale? What was that? You know what I’m talking about?

Dave Lorenzo:                       Yeah, I know exactly what you’re talking about. The client doesn’t decide when the sales process ends. You decide when the sales process ends.

Leila Chang:                           That’s one of my favorite things. I read that all the time.

Dave Lorenzo:                       That’s the thing. The sales process is over when you decide it’s over. If the client isn’t interested today, you simply haven’t shown them enough value or the right value. What you need to do is you need to figure out what problems they’re having and how you can solve them. Until you figure that out, you need to just keep coming back and asking them. Here’s the thing. If you do that in a way that is non-threatening and that is focused on them and benefiting them, few people will ever say, “No thank you. I don’t want help. I’m not interested in you doing something great for me.”

An example that I give people all the time is I’ll regularly talk to people and I’ll say, “What’s the biggest issue you’re having right now? If you could wave a magic wand and solve one problem, what would that be?” For example, with me, if it’s a problem with financing, I don’t have anything to do with finance. I help people with business strategy, productivity improvement, I can help you with a merger, an acquisition. I can help you sell more stuff, but finance is not my thing. However, I know a lot of bankers and I know a lot of people who can do some creative financing with really, really good results.

Somebody says to me, “I’m having trouble. I have to purchase heavy equipment.” Builder, “I have to purchase heavy equipment to buy a block of homes, and if I can’t get this equipment, I’m gonna be up a creek because I’m not gonna be able to build this new development.” Well it turns out, not only do I know somebody at Wells Fargo who does that kind of financing, but I also know a couple of people who will do financing short term for you ’cause you want to get started tomorrow. I got a guy who can get you the money tomorrow as long as you have a path to getting longer term financing.

That has nothing to do with me. I don’t have anything to do with that other than making the connection, but what does that do? It furthers the relationship. So when that person says to me, “Gosh Dave, I can’t thank you enough. You saved my business. I’m now gonna be up 30%, 40% for the year. Thank you so much.” I look at the person and I say, “You’re welcome, it’s my pleasure. I know you’d do the same for me, right?” They say, “Of course.” When you’re ready to sell those homes that you’re building on that lot, I want you to give me a call. I’m gonna help your team sell them faster than you sold out your last development. That’s how you handle providing value and developing relationships based on value.

The sales cycles may be three years, but the investment you make today will pay off down the road. That, my friends, is the big takeaway that we get from my good friend, Leila Chang. Leila, I thank you so much for joining us on the 60 Second Sale Show today. All of our guests here on the 60 Second Sale … This is my game show portion of the show, by the way, now Leila. All of our guests here on the 60 Second Sale Show receive two fabulous parting gifts. They receive the book Obsessed by Grant Cardone and they receive Million Dollar Maverick by my mentor, Alan Weiss.

I am going nuts with the bell I found on my desk today. Leila, thank you so much. Thanks, as always, to the wonderful and talented Nancy Pop for being our producer. That’ll wrap up our show for this week. Remember, if it is … Well, I don’t know. This show may not be on Wednesdays anymore, but if you’re listening to this show, it’s the 60 Second Sale Show. I can’t even speak. If you’re listening to the show, it’s the 60 Second Sale Show and I am Dave Lorenzo. Until next time, here’s hoping you make a great living and live a great life.

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How to Sell In a Regulated Environment Do you sell a product or service under strict scrutiny by the government? Are you looking to make progress in the healthcare, medical or dental industry? Isn't it frustrating working with a long sales cycle? How to Sell In a Regulated Environment<br /> <br /> Do you sell a product or service under strict scrutiny by the government?<br /> <br /> Are you looking to make progress in the healthcare, medical or dental industry?<br /> <br /> Isn't it frustrating working with a long sales cycle?<br /> <br /> Selling in a regulated environment is a challenge but it doesn't have to be.<br /> <br /> On this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we speak with Leila Chang the CEO of Florida Dental Benefits.  Leila helps us cut through the red tape and close the deal in a highly regulated industry.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:                       Hi there, Workplace Warriors. I'm Dave Lorenzo. You've only got 60 seconds to make a first impression and I've got half that time to convince you to come with me to the place to be. It's the place you know that will make your wallet grow. It is the 60 Second Sale Show. Welcome, everyone, to the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo, and today we've got something really special for you. Today, we have an inside look at how to sell in a regulated industry. I know many of you out there are concerned because we've been helping you develop relationships. We've been helping you build and grow your book of business, and you're focused on developing relationships, but you tell me, I hear all the time, I get emails, I get phone calls, I get text messages, I get shout-outs on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, "Dave, look. This is all great and I have great relationships with my buyers but I'm in a regulated industry. I have no choice. I have to answer an RFP. What do I do?"<br /> <br /> I heard you and we're answering that today. I have the best expert on the planet or at least the best expert I could find to answer this for you, my good friend Leila Chang. She's the CEO of Florida Dental Benefits. She's out there right now, her staff ... She's out there pounding the pavement. Her staff, her sales team, they're out there pounding the pavement every day looking to help the toothless population of Florida and she's going to teach us how to sell in a regulated industry. At least, she's going to give us some insight. She's going to give us a window into how you can break through if you have to follow an RFP process or if you're in a competitive industry or if you're in an industry that is ridiculously overregulated, this is the show for you. Now, I don't want you to tune out if you're not in a regulated industry because we've got all sorts of great stuff for you today. We're going to talk about the experience you provide to your clients. We're going to talk about that right now, but before I get into that, I'd be remiss if I didn't welcome in my partner in crime, the person who makes all this happen, the wonderful, the talented producer of this show, Nancy Pop. Hello Nancy, how are you today?<br /> <br /> Nancy Pop:                          Hello, Dave. I am just not getting out of bed from Thanksgiving. How about you?<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo:                       You know, it's funny. I'm sure there are a lot of people out there who are ... They're gonna listen to this show probably seven days from now or even into the future, and they're gonna be like, "Thanksgiving? What are you talking about? It's sunny, I'm at the beach, I'm listening to this podcast," and that's fine, but as we're recording this show today, it's one week from Thanksgiving, seven full days. It'll be seven full days tomorrow. I didn't really have the tryptophan coma this year. I did fry the turkey. If you listen to last week's show, we had my friend, Enrique Fernandez on the show last week and in addition to being an expert on developing systems, he also gave us some thoughts on how to fry a turkey. His insight was really, really good. I used a couple of his tips when I fried my own turkey on Thanksgiving. I think it came out pretty well. I'm gonna do another one next week. We have another group of people.<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo clean 33:35
Systems Enable Sales https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/30/systems-enable-sales/ Wed, 30 Nov 2016 18:00:55 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=1139 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/30/systems-enable-sales/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/30/systems-enable-sales/feed/ 0 Systems Enable Sales If you want to sell more - and who doesn't - you need to develop systems to enable your success.  This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is all about replicating your sales success.  Imagine duplicating your best performance, over and over and over. That's not only possible, that's what the best people and companys do. The best in any industry or profession create systems and processes to replicate success. Today we speak with an expert on systems who will show us how to create these systems to enablesales. The title of this episode is: Systems Enable Sales Here is the transcript for this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show: Welcome, everyone, to another edition of the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo, and we are focusing today on systems and how systems help you make more money. That's right, when you're organized, you make more money. I know, it is shocking. Absolutely shocking that being prepared, being organized, having a plan, and executing that plan would help you put more cash in your pocket, but it's absolutely true. On the show today, we have proof. That's right, we actually have someone who has systems and who's used systems, and systems help him make more money every day. Before we get to that, I want to welcome in our fantastic producer, Nancy Pop. Hello, Nancy, how are you today? Nancy Pop:      Hi, Dave. I'm doing well. How about you? Dave Lorenzo: I am absolutely wonderful. It is two days before Thanksgiving. We're recording this just two days before Thanksgiving 2016. Everyone's all fired up for the holiday. Nancy is ready to go eat turkey and drink eggnog or whatever it is she drinks after she drives 140 hours in a car to a very cold place. I, on the other hand, am preparing to deep fry a turkey. That's right, for the second year in a row, I will be deep frying a turkey, and this is not just the second time I've done it. I was so successful at deep frying my turkey last year that I not only deep fried a turkey for Thanksgiving, I did another one the week after Thanksgiving, and I did one every week from Thanksgiving to Christmas. I am now proclaiming myself an expert on deep frying turkeys. I also have deep fried chicken. I've deep fried a leg of pork. I love to deep fry stuff. I just discovered that I love to deep fry stuff last year. Now, the reason I think this is important, the reason I think you need to know about this, is because I have developed an entire system for frying a turkey from start to finish. The system began two days ago when I double-checked both the fire extinguishers that I put on either side of the area where we fry the turkey. You need two fire extinguishers, by the way, because deep frying a turkey is a two-person job. You always need one person keeping an eye on the oil, the temperature, and the flame, and the other person can actually keep an eye on the turkey while it's cooking. If there is an incident and some oil splatters and it happens to catch one person's pants on fire, you want a fire extinguisher next to both people so that if anything happens, one person can grab a fire extinguisher right next to them and put it out. My system consists of a couple of days before, checking the fire extinguishers. Today, we set up the entire frying system, which is a propane frying system, and I tested it out with water. Tomorrow, we will take the actual turkey, and put it in the pot with water, and sore the side of the pot so we know how much oil to put in. Then, I have a checklist, step by step, on the day when we actually fry the turkey, which is two days from now, as to what we do, when we do it, and how we go about it. The reason that I created this is because I didn't want to forget how I did it successfully, and I wanted to be able to replicate that process quickly next year. This was last year. I wanted to be able to replicate the process quickly last year. For example, last year, to put the bird in and out of the oil, Systems Enable Sales

If you want to sell more – and who doesn’t – you need to develop systems to enable your success.  This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is all about replicating your sales success.  Imagine duplicating your best performance, over and over and over.

That’s not only possible, that’s what the best people and companys do.

The best in any industry or profession create systems and processes to replicate success.

Today we speak with an expert on systems who will show us how to create these systems to enablesales.

The title of this episode is: Systems Enable Sales

Here is the transcript for this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show:

Welcome, everyone, to another edition of the 60 Second Sale Show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo, and we are focusing today on systems and how systems help you make more money. That’s right, when you’re organized, you make more money. I know, it is shocking. Absolutely shocking that being prepared, being organized, having a plan, and executing that plan would help you put more cash in your pocket, but it’s absolutely true. On the show today, we have proof. That’s right, we actually have someone who has systems and who’s used systems, and systems help him make more money every day.

Before we get to that, I want to welcome in our fantastic producer, Nancy Pop. Hello, Nancy, how are you today?

Nancy Pop:      Hi, Dave. I’m doing well. How about you?

Dave Lorenzo: I am absolutely wonderful. It is two days before Thanksgiving. We’re recording this just two days before Thanksgiving 2016. Everyone’s all fired up for the holiday. Nancy is ready to go eat turkey and drink eggnog or whatever it is she drinks after she drives 140 hours in a car to a very cold place. I, on the other hand, am preparing to deep fry a turkey. That’s right, for the second year in a row, I will be deep frying a turkey, and this is not just the second time I’ve done it. I was so successful at deep frying my turkey last year that I not only deep fried a turkey for Thanksgiving, I did another one the week after Thanksgiving, and I did one every week from Thanksgiving to Christmas. I am now proclaiming myself an expert on deep frying turkeys. I also have deep fried chicken. I’ve deep fried a leg of pork. I love to deep fry stuff. I just discovered that I love to deep fry stuff last year.

Now, the reason I think this is important, the reason I think you need to know about this, is because I have developed an entire system for frying a turkey from start to finish. The system began two days ago when I double-checked both the fire extinguishers that I put on either side of the area where we fry the turkey. You need two fire extinguishers, by the way, because deep frying a turkey is a two-person job. You always need one person keeping an eye on the oil, the temperature, and the flame, and the other person can actually keep an eye on the turkey while it’s cooking. If there is an incident and some oil splatters and it happens to catch one person’s pants on fire, you want a fire extinguisher next to both people so that if anything happens, one person can grab a fire extinguisher right next to them and put it out.

My system consists of a couple of days before, checking the fire extinguishers. Today, we set up the entire frying system, which is a propane frying system, and I tested it out with water. Tomorrow, we will take the actual turkey, and put it in the pot with water, and sore the side of the pot so we know how much oil to put in. Then, I have a checklist, step by step, on the day when we actually fry the turkey, which is two days from now, as to what we do, when we do it, and how we go about it. The reason that I created this is because I didn’t want to forget how I did it successfully, and I wanted to be able to replicate that process quickly next year. This was last year. I wanted to be able to replicate the process quickly last year.

For example, last year, to put the bird in and out of the oil, the bird goes on an apparatus, which it looks like a grappling hook. The grappling hook goes through the center of the turkey, and it has a little eyelet at the top. You have to get that. You have to put it in the oil and fish it out of the oil somehow. I, last year, wasn’t aware of this, so I quickly rigged, with duct tape, a coat hanger, and a broomstick, a way to fish the turkey out of the oil. Well, broomstick is wood, oil is flammable, not good. This year, we have an entire apparatus we’ve built, and it has a swiveling paint bucket hook on it. It has an eyelet that hooks it to a metal pole, and we have duct tape grips at either end of the pole so that we can raise and lower the turkey without ever having to get near the pot, nor worrying about anything flame up on us. We have a whole checklist, a whole system set up for frying the turkey this year on Thanksgiving, and I am thrilled. I could not be happier. I am ready to go.

The point is systems do three things for you. Systems, number one, help you replicate success. Systems help you replicate success. I’m going to replicate my success of deep frying this fantastic, beautiful bird from last year to this year. I’m going to be able to replicate it exactly. I’ll probably even enhance or modify the system to make it even better for the next time I do it. The second thing systems do is they give you the advantage of speed. Systems allow you to get going quickly. They allow you to make things happen at a rapid pace, because you don’t have to think about each step and think about the possible ramifications of what you’re doing. You’ve already done it, and it’s written down. It’s right there for you. It’s ready to go.

The third thing that systems do is they allow someone to step in your shoes. Let’s say that someone, one of my friends, has a turkey emergency, and I have to leave my house on Thanksgiving, and I have to go attend to this turkey emergency. Any one of the people who are here could step in and follow my checklist for frying a turkey and do just as good a job. They could follow my detailed instructions, my step-by-step guide, for frying the turkey, and they could do it just as well as I could, because the system is already in place. Systems help you make more money. Systems lead to success. That’s the point of our show today. Although you may not be frying a turkey while you’re reading this or listening to this, you will need systems in order to sell more.

Today, I have invited the person who is the best at creating systems, the best I’ve seen in my 20-plus years in business. This guy is a systems maniac. He has systems for everything from loading the toner in his printer. He probably has a system better than mine for frying a turkey. Nancy, if you’d be so kind, would you please introduce and welcome in our guest for today.

Nancy Pop:      Yes. So, today we have Enrique J. Fernandez. He is a Miami native who is a veteran of the United States Air Force. After completion of his military service, Mr. Fernandez pursued his education, Enrique J. Fernandezearning his bachelor’s degree with cum laude honors from Embry-Riddle University. He then attended the University of Miami School of Law, focusing on real estate, and earned his Juris Doctorate degree in 2006 and was admitted to the Florida Bar in 2007. Mr. Fernandez has been in private practice representing clients in real estate matters since 2007. He represents clients in many types of real estate matters, including rental disputes, real estate purchases, code violation resolutions, lien mitigation, quiet title actions, short-sale processing, loan modification processing, and foreclosure defense.

In his representation of investors, Mr. Fernandez strives to develop a pricing structure that results in a mutually beneficial relationship that allows the investor to obtain quality, accessible legal counsel. Whether it be protecting the investor’s interests in the purchase of an asset, its management, or sale, Mr. Fernandez strives to streamline the processes involved and protect his client’s interest at every stage of the process. Mr. Fernandez is also an active member of the South Miami Kendall Bar Association and currently the acting treasurer and the president-elect of the association. Sounds like we have a celebrity.

Dave Lorenzo: Wow, welcome Enrique Fernandez. That’s fantastic. Is there anything else that we need to know about you, Enrique?

Enrique:           Yes. I’ve actually been frying turkeys for some 20 years now, and I can add a couple points to your process, if you’re interested. Just let me know.

Dave Lorenzo: Oh yeah, please do. Please do.

Enrique:           Well, one of the things that I do is I fry a practice turkey before the turkey that I’m going to actually cook for the guests. What that allows me to do is get the oil up to temperature. It gets one turkey in, which kind of seasons the oil a little bit, and that first turkey we take out, and we actually carve it before most of the guests get to the house. We go ahead and put the meat into aluminum foil little turkeys and throw them in the fridge, so everybody has nice chunks of meat to go home with as leftovers after the meal.

Dave Lorenzo: Wow, that’s a great idea. That is an absolutely fantastic idea. We do one fried turkey and one baked turkey, because there are some traditionalists who like the turkey made in the oven. I love the idea of doing the practice turkey and giving people that to take home. I think that’s awesome. Fantastic. Now, do you have a system you use to get your turkey frying together?

Enrique:           I mean, I do. You know, it’s funny. I actually started doing this when I was in the Air Force, and believe it or not, it’s one of those don’t try this at home things. I learned how to fry a turkey on the second-story balcony of a wood building in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Dave Lorenzo: Oh my gosh.

Enrique:           Which is, now looking back, a crazy, very dangerous thing to do. We were, at least, smart enough to know how dangerous what we were involved in was and took it very seriously. We developed a plan and really some experience that helped us put together a procedure that I’ve been using now for 15, 20 years, I guess.

Dave Lorenzo: That’s terrific. I am going to do an entire video. I’m not going to do it on Thanksgiving, because there’s too much pressure on Thanksgiving for everything to go perfect. I’m going to do a video, probably, next week of how to fry a turkey. What I’d like to do is I’ll do the video, and then you and I can get together, and we can do live commentary on frying the turkey. You can give me some extra tips that you have for doing it. I’ve found that you would think you’d be able to find more YouTube videos, more really good videos, on how to fry a turkey, but there really aren’t very many good ones out there. There are videos of people burning their homes down.

Enrique:           Exactly.

Dave Lorenzo: There are videos of them spilling hot oil on each other, but there’s very few videos of people doing a good job frying a turkey. I am going to do a YouTube instructional video on how to fry a turkey, and we’ll lay it out step-by-step, and you and I can do the color commentary.

Enrique:           Count me in.

Dave Lorenzo: Enrique, let’s do this. Let’s talk about the systems that you use, but what I’m interested in, we’re not going to sell people on using systems or standard operating procedures. What I want to do is I want people to learn, in the next five to 10 minutes, how to develop a standard operating procedure. Give us, if you can, a two-minute overview of the value of systems in your law firm. Then, after you give us that two-minute overview, let’s you and I get into a discussion about how to develop systems or standard operating procedures in sales and in marketing.

Enrique:           I think it really comes down to two things that I despise when it comes to my business. I really cannot stand making the same decision more than once or on a repetitive basis, if you will, and I cannot stand making the same mistake twice. I’m not naïve enough to think that my staff is not going to make mistakes. We’re very, very careful about what we do, but my bigger concern is when we do have a misstep, no matter how minor it is, we make sure to look at the procedures and determine whether this was a breakdown in our procedures or was it something out of our control? That has been a huge help in what I do in making my business profitable.

I shouldn’t say mistake as much as a challenge. When we come across a challenge, is this something that stemmed from our procedures, or is it something that’s outside of our control? If it’s something outside of our control, is there something that we can put in our procedures to identify it earlier in the process in order to resolve it? Making the same mistake or having the same challenges come up is one part of the downside that we’re trying to address with the procedures here.

The other is the repetitive decisions. Hey, is it time to order tuner yet? In my business, we have to order searchers for closings. Should we order the searches now? If we don’t order them now, should we order them tomorrow? When should we order them? By writing down procedures and policies about all of those things, it keeps me from having to make, for instance, that decision on when we order a title search on every single file.

Dave Lorenzo: That’s fantastic. Let’s talk a little bit about how you develop standard operating procedures or how you develop these systems. What is your system for developing systems, Enrique? How do you get people to keep track of what they’re doing, particularly when it’s something that’s in their area of natural talent, right? How do you get them to keep track of what they’re doing? How do you test it and make sure it works for everyone? Give us the way that you develop your systems.

Enrique:           From the most basic level, the policies and procedures, it’s a living document, first of all. One of the things I realized when I set out to try to accomplish this was I had documents scattered everywhere throughout my hard drive, on my desktop, all these different kind of notes I’d taken and checklists and these types of things. One of the biggest things that helped was putting them all in one single folder, one single place where you keep everything, and coming up with a little bit of a numbering system to identify and separate the different types of procedures, different areas within the company, those types of things. At the most basic level, just structuring of the documents themselves was a little bit of a challenge. Really, whenever we put it in one place, it became a lot easier to find things. We also have a Word document that is a template for procedures. If you’re going to create a procedure, we use that template to start with.

Then, the drafting of the procedures themselves really comes down to taking notes. Whenever we’re trying to come up with a procedure, it’s not as if we’re sitting down and thinking, well, how do we do this? How do we process a file? What is the first step that we should do? Okay, that’s the first step. We write that down. Then, we think after we do that, what will we do? That’s not how we do it here. What we do is we process a file. If we’re writing a procedure on how to process a file, we will process a file. As we’re processing the file, we’ll take notes of what we did. Then, those notes of the steps that we took to process a file will be the beginning draft of the final procedure.

Then, we will analyze those notes and think, okay, is this the best way to do it? Is there something we should add here? Is there something here that’s not productive that should be removed? Then, the journey begins on that procedure. A procedure’s never done. It’s a living document. The starting point for it is really just taking notes as we do something that we want to have a procedure for.

Dave Lorenzo: From a sales perspective, if you’re reaching out to clients and you’re making a follow-up call, maybe what you do is you quickly write down first look up the client’s file, review notes in file to see what the last conversation was, review notes in file to see client’s name, review notes in file to see client’s kids’ names, review notes in file to see client’s spouse’s names so that you have something to do to start the conversation. That would be the initial start of how to make a follow-up call, the procedure for how to make a follow-up call, the system for how to make a follow-up call.

Now, Enrique, you do a very good, in fact an excellent, weekly email newsletter. I don’t want to get into that. That’s a separate conversation for a separate time, but tell us about the system you’ve developed for doing the weekly email newsletter. You do it yourself every week, but you have a procedure for doing it, don’t you?

Enrique:           Yes, absolutely. It’s my newsletter, and one of the things that sets my newsletter apart from most newsletters is the fact that all the drafting, the language, the copy if you will, is mine. It’s my personal work. What I do is I’ve created a procedure that allows me to sit down and write, and when I’m done writing, that’s all I have to do. Then, I hand it over to my staff. I have somebody in my staff that proofreads it. I give it one last check to make sure that I agree with whatever changes they think should be made. Then, we have a procedure in place to upload that article into the system that we use to send out those emails. We also have a schedule of when those emails are supposed to go out, who they’re supposed to go out to, those types of things.

When it comes to my actual time involved with that newsletter, it’s limited to sitting down and writing it. That is not something that I can delegate. It’s very important to me that that newsletter has my voice and that my readers get to know me and feel a connection with me, because they know that it’s actually me writing as opposed to some of the newsletters I get. For example, I just received one on how to winterize your house. We are in Miami, Florida. That’s not all that difficult down here. You can tell it’s a national newsletter, and they’re subscribed to some system, and they sent it out.

Dave Lorenzo: How to winterize your house in Miami: turn off the air conditioning.

Enrique:           Right, exactly. Now, if they would have sent it out and made a joke about it and said that turn your heater on and burn off the dust, then that would have been great, but it wasn’t that. It was something else. The point is I’ve limited my time, my investment of time, in that newsletter to just my writing. Then, from there, my staff takes it, uploads it, makes sure it gets distributed, and all of that.

Dave Lorenzo: I think a huge takeaway is that even for something that you’re personally involved in, you still have a system associated with it. You still have a process, a procedure, associated with it so that everybody knows what’s going on, and everybody knows what’s happening at what point in the process.

Enrique:           Absolutely.

Dave Lorenzo: Now, let’s give everybody a starting point, everybody who’s listening. I’ve never written systems before. I’m out there in a business. I’m an entrepreneur or I’m a sales professional. I’m out here, and I want to replicate my success. What’s the first thing I need to do to get started with my system? Do I make an inventory of everything that I need to do systems for? Do I have like a table of contents? How do I start?

Enrique:           Personally, what I would do is I would take out a notebook and a pen, and I would put it next to my desk. The next thing that I do that I do often, I would take notes of how I do it, and I would have created my first procedure. One of the things that I think holds people back when it comes to this is overthinking it and making it into a mountain whenever one procedure is better than none, five procedures are better than one, and so on and so forth. I think I’m up to, I haven’t counted lately, but I’m somewhere around 400 plus that we have here in my office, between the procedures and the forms and everything. We keep all of that in one folder, like I said.

Dave Lorenzo: That’s amazing. That’s absolutely amazing. You get to replicate your success in every area, and anybody new who comes in can look at it, and it saves everyone a whole lot of headache, a whole lot of time. It helps you make more money. That’s the bottom line. Fantastic. I absolutely love it. Enrique, if our folks want to reach out to you for advice on this or for real estate advice, particularly real estate advice in south Florida, where can they reach you? What’s the best way for people to reach out and get a hold of you?

Enrique:           They can call me. (305) 226-4529.

Dave Lorenzo: Give it to us again.

Enrique:           (305) 226-4529.

Dave Lorenzo: That’s Enrique J. Fernandez, PA. Enrique is an attorney here in Miami. He works on real estate transactions, but I encourage you to call him with any legal need, if you have any issue in Florida at all, anything from a DUI to a maritime case, you want to register a boat, call Enrique. He’ll put you in touch with a lawyer. If he doesn’t handle that area, he’ll put you in touch with a lawyer who handles it. Enrique, you have my deep thanks for joining us today to give us your insight on systems and on turkey frying. For more on the latter topic, stay tuned as Enrique and I add commentary to a fantastic turkey frying video.

As always, I am grateful to our wonderful producer, Nancy Pop. To both of you to everyone listening, I want to wish you the best and happiest of holiday seasons. By the time everyone listens to this, we’ll all have had our fill of turkey, but the holiday season will be in full swing. Once again, everyone, the happiest of holidays. Thank you for joining us, and until next time, I’m Dave Lorenzo. I hope you make a great living and live a great life.

Go out right now and build your systems because Systems Enable Sales.

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Systems Enable Sales If you want to sell more - and who doesn't - you need to develop systems to enable your success.  This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is all about replicating your sales success.  Imagine duplicating your best performance, Systems Enable Sales<br /> <br /> If you want to sell more - and who doesn't - you need to develop systems to enable your success.  This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is all about replicating your sales success.  Imagine duplicating your best performance, over and over and over.<br /> <br /> That's not only possible, that's what the best people and companys do.<br /> <br /> The best in any industry or profession create systems and processes to replicate success.<br /> <br /> Today we speak with an expert on systems who will show us how to create these systems to enablesales.<br /> <br /> The title of this episode is: Systems Enable Sales<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript for this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show:<br /> <br /> Welcome, everyone, to another edition of the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo, and we are focusing today on systems and how systems help you make more money. That's right, when you're organized, you make more money. I know, it is shocking. Absolutely shocking that being prepared, being organized, having a plan, and executing that plan would help you put more cash in your pocket, but it's absolutely true. On the show today, we have proof. That's right, we actually have someone who has systems and who's used systems, and systems help him make more money every day.<br /> <br /> Before we get to that, I want to welcome in our fantastic producer, Nancy Pop. Hello, Nancy, how are you today?<br /> <br /> Nancy Pop:      Hi, Dave. I'm doing well. How about you?<br /> <br /> Dave Lorenzo: I am absolutely wonderful. It is two days before Thanksgiving. We're recording this just two days before Thanksgiving 2016. Everyone's all fired up for the holiday. Nancy is ready to go eat turkey and drink eggnog or whatever it is she drinks after she drives 140 hours in a car to a very cold place. I, on the other hand, am preparing to deep fry a turkey. That's right, for the second year in a row, I will be deep frying a turkey, and this is not just the second time I've done it. I was so successful at deep frying my turkey last year that I not only deep fried a turkey for Thanksgiving, I did another one the week after Thanksgiving, and I did one every week from Thanksgiving to Christmas. I am now proclaiming myself an expert on deep frying turkeys. I also have deep fried chicken. I've deep fried a leg of pork. I love to deep fry stuff. I just discovered that I love to deep fry stuff last year.<br /> <br /> Now, the reason I think this is important, the reason I think you need to know about this, is because I have developed an entire system for frying a turkey from start to finish. The system began two days ago when I double-checked both the fire extinguishers that I put on either side of the area where we fry the turkey. You need two fire extinguishers, by the way, because deep frying a turkey is a two-person job. You always need one person keeping an eye on the oil, the temperature, and the flame, and the other person can actually keep an eye on the turkey while it's cooking. If there is an incident and some oil splatters and it happens to catch one person's pants on fire, you want a fire extinguisher next to both people so that if anything happens, one person can grab a fire extinguisher right next to them and put it out.<br /> <br /> My system consists of a couple of days before, checking the fire extinguishers. Today, we set up the entire frying system, which is a propane frying system, and I tested it out with water. Tomorrow, we will take the actual turkey, and put it in the pot with water, and sore the side of the pot so we know how much oil to put in. Then, I have a checklist, step by step, on the day when we actually fry the turkey, which is two days from now, as to what we do, when we do it, and how we go about it. The reason that I created this is because I didn't want to forget how I did it successfully, and I wanted to be able to replicate that process quickly next year. Dave Lorenzo clean 23:35
The Inside Story of Relationship-Based Sales https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/21/inside-relationship-based-sales/ Mon, 21 Nov 2016 17:00:27 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=1123 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/21/inside-relationship-based-sales/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/21/inside-relationship-based-sales/feed/ 0 On this episode of the Sixty Second Sales Show we welcome Pat Murphy from Heartland Payment Systems. Pat is an expert on relationship-based sales and he gives us the inside scoop on making more money with relationships. Here is the transcript for this episode: Hi there, and welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo, and we've got a fantastic show for you today. Today we're talking about relationships, that's right, you know that the 60 Second Sale is basically love at first sight for businesses when you connect with someone and you have that instant spark, that spark that connects you and the other person and you know you're going to do business together, that is the essence of the 60 Second Sale. Well, we're going to take it beyond love at first sight. Today we're going to talk about how you can improve your sales process by deepening your relationships with your clients. I know, if you're listening to this, you're used to kicking in doors and connecting with people through brute force, by telling them what you have to offer and showing them how great it's going to be for them and demonstrating to them the power of the solution that you provide. That's fine, if you're doing that now I don't want you to stop doing that yet. What I'm going to do today is I'm going to demonstrate to you that relationships, powerful relationships are more valuable than the relationships you make when you kick in doors, sell your services and move on. Our focus is on lifetime value, delivering value over the course of your lifetime to your clients, and they in turn will deliver value to you in the form of financial compensation. Of course, before we get into anything, I need to welcome in and offer my thanks and appreciation to everybody's favorite burka wearing producer, Nancy Pop. Good morning Nancy, how are you today? Good morning Dave. I'm good. How are you? Awesome. It is great as always to have you hear. I'm doing fine. Thanks for asking. We have a special guest today, but before we introduce him, Nancy, I want to tell you a little story, I want to tell everyone a little story. This weekend was a beautiful weekend here just south of Tamiami Trail in Miami-Dade County, Florida. We had a baseball game with my son on Saturday and then on Sunday I went through the list, the list of things that my wife had for me to do around the house. On that list was a project that I absolutely cannot stand, it's the project ... Well, I'll tell you what happened. In the front of my house we have this fountain. It's this stone structure that has a little pump in it and it spits water out the top and the water overflows from one bowl into the next. It looks good and it sounds good, I guess people think it sounds good, if I stand next to it too long it makes me have to go pee, but that's a different story for a different time. Anyway, the fountain out in front of the house as broken, and the thing about this project is, if you call a plumber, a plumber is not going to come out and fix the fountain, he's just not going to do it, it's not a big enough job for a plumber and it's not really a plumbing job. If you call a handyman, a handyman's going to give you a really hard time about doing this job because the structure of the fountain itself, it's stone, these pieces of stone are anywhere between 25 pounds and 150 pounds, the base I think is well over 300 pounds, and they have to be lifted up, you've got to take the thing apart in order to get to the pump. I fixed this once before, I fixed it six months ago and I went through the whole process of calling plumbers, calling handymen, the pool guy, nobody will fix this stupid fountain. We have company coming in the next couple of weeks. As we're recording this this is the middle of November, the holiday season is around the corner, but my son's birthday is on the 20th of November and that's a big deal, everybody flies in from all over the place for my son's birthday ... On this episode of the Sixty Second Sales Show we welcome Pat Murphy from Heartland Payment Systems. Pat is an expert on relationship-based sales and he gives us the inside scoop on making more money with relationships.

Here is the transcript for this episode:

Hi there, and welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo, and we’ve got a fantastic show for you today. Today we’re talking about relationships, that’s right, you know that the 60 Second Sale is basically love at first sight for businesses when you connect with someone and you have that instant spark, that spark that connects you and the other person and you know you’re going to do business together, that is the essence of the 60 Second Sale. Well, we’re going to take it beyond love at first sight. Today we’re going to talk about how you can improve your sales process by deepening your relationships with your clients. I know, if you’re listening to this, you’re used to kicking in doors and connecting with people through brute force, by telling them what you have to offer and showing them how great it’s going to be for them and demonstrating to them the power of the solution that you provide. That’s fine, if you’re doing that now I don’t want you to stop doing that yet.

What I’m going to do today is I’m going to demonstrate to you that relationships, powerful relationships are more valuable than the relationships you make when you kick in doors, sell your services and move on. Our focus is on lifetime value, delivering value over the course of your lifetime to your clients, and they in turn will deliver value to you in the form of financial compensation. Of course, before we get into anything, I need to welcome in and offer my thanks and appreciation to everybody’s favorite burka wearing producer, Nancy Pop. Good morning Nancy, how are you today?

Good morning Dave. I’m good. How are you?

Awesome. It is great as always to have you hear. I’m doing fine. Thanks for asking. We have a special guest today, but before we introduce him, Nancy, I want to tell you a little story, I want to tell everyone a little story. This weekend was a beautiful weekend here just south of Tamiami Trail in Miami-Dade County, Florida. We had a baseball game with my son on Saturday and then on Sunday I went through the list, the list of things that my wife had for me to do around the house. On that list was a project that I absolutely cannot stand, it’s the project … Well, I’ll tell you what happened. In the front of my house we have this fountain. It’s this stone structure that has a little pump in it and it spits water out the top and the water overflows from one bowl into the next. It looks good and it sounds good, I guess people think it sounds good, if I stand next to it too long it makes me have to go pee, but that’s a different story for a different time.

Anyway, the fountain out in front of the house as broken, and the thing about this project is, if you call a plumber, a plumber is not going to come out and fix the fountain, he’s just not going to do it, it’s not a big enough job for a plumber and it’s not really a plumbing job. If you call a handyman, a handyman’s going to give you a really hard time about doing this job because the structure of the fountain itself, it’s stone, these pieces of stone are anywhere between 25 pounds and 150 pounds, the base I think is well over 300 pounds, and they have to be lifted up, you’ve got to take the thing apart in order to get to the pump.

I fixed this once before, I fixed it six months ago and I went through the whole process of calling plumbers, calling handymen, the pool guy, nobody will fix this stupid fountain. We have company coming in the next couple of weeks. As we’re recording this this is the middle of November, the holiday season is around the corner, but my son’s birthday is on the 20th of November and that’s a big deal, everybody flies in from all over the place for my son’s birthday party every year, he’s the prince of the family so everybody comes in and we have a million people in the house for the next two months, so the fountain has to work.

My wife and my son go out, they had something to do, that leaves my five year old daughter and I. She decides she’s going to be my helper. We take the stone fountain apart, it’s laying all over the driveway, I decide that I’m going to go get a new pump, I go to the store, I get a new pump. Now I’m exhausted and my arms are all beat up from moving these stones, because a five year old, she can’t lift much, and I’m actually, now that I think about it, I’m really starting to wonder what the value of having a five year old child is, because all she does is really eat and sleep and poop. There’s not a lot of help going on and I’m putting the fountain back together, I put the pump in, you can’t really test the pump because it shuts off if there’s not enough water.

I’m putting the fountain back together and I’m just dreading it, I’m hating this job, I don’t have the right tools, I’m improvising. I should have had a work table that extended up so I could rest pieces of the fountain on while I threaded the tubing through it. You know what I was doing? I was holding up 150, 200 pound pieces of stone while the five year old threaded the tubing through. You can imagine how successful that was. “Oh Daddy, you’re really sweating, you’re really sweating a lot.” “Yeah, I know, I know, get the tube through the stone. You can do it, come on, put the tube through.” “It’s not really working, I’m not sure. Oh look, a squirrel! Daddy, look, did you see the squirrel?” “Get the tube through the stone. This stone is really heavy.” “It’s a squirrel, Daddy, it’s a squirrel. Oh look what he’s doing, he’s going up the tree.” “I can’t hold this anymore!” That was my struggle through this project, okay?

The value of this story for all of us today is that if I had planned this appropriately and I had the right tools to do the job, it wouldn’t have been so awful and I wouldn’t have dreaded it so much, it wouldn’t have been the nightmare that it was, my back wouldn’t be sore today four days later, my arms wouldn’t be all beat up and bruised, I wouldn’t be feeling like … I went to the gym and I ran two miles to the gym, I ran two miles in the gym and I ran two miles back home this morning, and I did the same thing yesterday except I did eight miles and that was easier than putting the stupid stone fountain together.

The moral of the story is this: we hate to do things when we don’t have a plan, when we don’t have a system and when we don’t have the write tools. This is especially true with sales. When you don’t have a plan for doing things … I didn’t have a plan for putting that thing together. I took it apart, threw it across my lawn into my driveway, and then when I went to put it back together my plan was to use the five year old to thread the tubing through. Well, that wasn’t really a plan, it was a bad plan. That’s the way most of us go out and sell today. We don’t have a plan. I didn’t have the right tools. If I had a work bench that I could raise and lower I could put the stone on the work bench right over where it was supposed to be and I could have fed the tubing through and then removed the workbench and put the stone down, but I didn’t have that, I didn’t have the right tools to do the job.

Our goal here on the 60 Second Sales Show and at DaveLorenzo.com is to provide you with the right tools to get the job done and also to give you a plan. Our system gives you a plan for selling. That’s what we’re doing here for you today and every week on the 60 Second Sales Show, every day with a new article at DaveLorenzo.com and three, four, five times a week on our video section also at DaveLorenzo.com. Thank you for joining us, and at this point I want to welcome in a guy who’s got a plan for everything. He’s someone I’ve known, well, I’ve known him for well over 25 years. I was trying to think about it as I was coming home from the gym today, I think it may even be over 30 years that I know him. He is the master of relationship based sales. He’s one of the best at it, and so that we can have an impartial third party introduce him, I’d like to bring Nancy in to introduce my good friend Pat Murphy, who’s our guest today. Nancy, why don’t you introduce us all to Pat, please?

Yes, Patrick Murphy is a senior director of business development for Heartland Payment Systems. He Patrick D. Murphyhas been at Heartland for 16 years, starting as a relationship manager and working his way up through the sales organization to this role. A role that was created three years ago to help develop strong referral partners for Heartland Sales Team in the northeast, mid Atlantic, and Great Lake states. Overall, Pat has 20 years of experience in this electronic payments industry in addition to several years as a manager with Marriott Hotels. Pat lives in North Conway, New Hampshire, with his wife Kelly and seven children. He plays hockey, makes attempts to be a competitive runner and is involved with many community organizations in his local area.

Welcome, Pat, to the show. Thank you very much for joining us. The one question that is going through everybody’s mind right now, you know what it is, seven kids! How the hell do you and Kelly do it?

You know, you just do it, it’s just like sales, Dave, you just find a way to get it done. You had an interesting comment a couple of minutes ago about not having any value or not having any use for a five year old at your house. I think the biggest question is, what value does a fountain bring to your yard?

Ha-ha! Fair point, fair point. At this point I will honestly tell you, there is absolutely no value to have … Maybe if you drink a little bit of water and you want to go to the bathroom before you get in the car, you stand for five minutes and look at the fountain and that makes you have to go. Of course, you know I was only being playful. My five year old brings immeasurable joy because she has a very dry sharp wit, I believe much like her father, and she’s also extremely beautiful just like her mother, so we have lots of use for a five year old. One of the best uses for a five year old is when you leave something upstairs and you’re comfortable on the couch, because they’ll go up and get anything you want. All right, so, Pat, give us … What I like to do here is I like to tell … Obviously you know I like to tell stories, so give us your greatest sales triumph story. Give me a great sales victory story.

I think my greatest sales victory was when I was promoted to division manager here at Heartland Payment Systems. The division manager role is a regional sales leadership role. I oversaw Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont and led a team of about 20 sales reps. I got into sales, I started at Heartland with very minimal sales experience and I was hoping to just meet my own goals as a sales rep and have a good living and live a great life as you like to say. As I got into it more I was thinking about this role, but just did not think that sales manager was in my DNA, but I think my management training from my career at Marriott definitely prepared me for it. I was promoted to that role about ten years ago and have had one of the top performing teams in the country and moved on to greater career advancements since then. I think that was one of my most significant sales victories.

Okay, terrific, thanks. Tell me a little bit about the qualities you find in great sales professionals. Because you’ve hired a ton of salespeople and now you advise your folks on how to hire salespeople. What are some of the qualities you look for in outstanding sales professionals?

Our role is an outside salesperson, so everybody works in pretty much the communities that they live in, so somebody that’s definitely self starter and somebody that can work with very minimal face to face supervision is one thing, but I think one of the key qualities is just resilience. Obviously, a sales role of any type has a lot of rejection, a lot of obstacles, and our industry is no exception. The electronics payment industry is constantly evolving and constantly changing and there can be a lot of frustration in sales and a lot of obstacles get in your way and it’s easy to get discouraged, but people have that resilience of finding a way to get it done despite all the many obstacles that get in the way, are truly the ones that succeed.

Okay, now tell me about resilience and the way that you teach people to sell at Heartland. You’re taking a unique approach now in your company, because your company is (you can correct me if I’m wrong), your company is 100% commission based sales, is that right?

That’s correct.

Your folks, from the time they hit the ground running, if they don’t sell, they don’t eat, it’s the true eat what you kill model. You’re taking a bit of a different approach, contrast for us the approach that you were taught when you first got to Heartland and now the approach that you’re taking and then the culture that you’re trying to create in your role at Heartland.

Sure. We’ve got very detailed methodologies on how to set an appointment with a potential customer and how to run an appointment. For years we really pushed heavily on prospecting, cold calling, knocking on doors, all those traditional types of sales methodologies. Really, in order to grow our company and give our sales reps the opportunity to have a more sustainable career over the long term, we’ve really turned the corner over the last three years and have also started promoting and training methodologies when it comes to developing partnerships and referral partners, and we’ve found that our top performers, when we look at where their deals are coming from, out of our top performing reps at least 35% of their production comes from referral partners.

These are what we call ‘coded partners’, where they are a signed affiliate with us, but they could have other partners as well, like in a handshake agreement, that they may refer business back and forth from each other, that they get deals from as well. Our top performers are the ones that get to the top by using referral partners that refer them business on a regular basis. They know that during the course of the day there’s only so many hours in the day to knock on doors and make prospecting calls and such, and the only way to grow, and what sales rep doesn’t want to grow? The only way to grow is by developing partners that can bring them business.

I look at this in a couple of different ways. I look at the greatest sales people, like the Zig Ziglar type salespeople, the Tom Hopkins type salespeople, are people who are just … David Sandler used to tell a story. For those of you who don’t know, David Sandler is one of the world famous sales gurus. He’s a sales trainer. He used to tell a story about how he used to drive to downtown Baltimore where he lived when he was a sales rep. He used to park his car in the parking lot, it was an open air parking lot, before the parking lot opened so the guy wouldn’t be there to take the money, and then he would go knock on doors and sell, people would pay him in cash, and if he didn’t sell anything he wouldn’t have enough money to get his car out of the parking lot.

That’s a quality that for years I always look for that quality in the best salespeople. I know you guys at Heartland would think that that type of quality, a hungry person, is a great salesperson. How do you teach that person, the outside cat, the alley cat if you will. How do you domesticate that person? How do you make them an inside cat, bring them inside and teach them, “Hey listen, I still want you to kick in those doors, but I want you to kick in the door to develop a relationship.” What is that process like, teaching those people? How do you teach them to become that relationship oriented person?

It’s funny, just going back to your previous comment though, Dave, about David Sandler. I read that same story in his book. He’s got a great book, You Can’t Teach A Kid To Ride A Bike At A Seminar. I remember reading that story about the parking lot in Baltimore which was excellent. Really when it comes to training the sales team, the best way to change people’s habits is by showing them how the top performers do it. Our sales team, and I’m sure sales industry in general, when they see how the top performers do it, that’s generally what they want to emulate. The results speak for themselves. As I mentioned before, at least 37% of the production from our top performing sales reps comes from partners, but also our company statistics show us that the average deal on a customer sourced to us through a partner is worth 42% more than one that is self sourced.

Wow, that’s huge.

Right. Also, Dave, retention is higher. The customers that come to us sourced through partners stay with us on average 41% longer than those that are sourced on our own. The statistics and the results really show for it and when they see that, then that’s what motivates them to change their habits.

When you refer to your partners, our folks who listen may know them as evangelists, people who don’t use your services directly, but refer you all the time. When we talk about partners for you at Heartland you’re talking about banks and CPAs, right?

Right. Banks, CPAs, insurance agents, technology partners such as the point of sale companies that sell and install and service the software that processes the credit card transactions or handles the payroll time and attendance software. Also, just any type of company or even an individual that works with the same type of customers as us, that’s a good cultural fifth that we can refer business back and forth in the community to each other. Those are all types of partners that we work with.

Okay, so how do you teach a salesperson who’s used to the instant gratification of closing a deal, how do you teach them, what’s the method they use to develop these relationships? Here I am, I’m Dave Lorenzo, it’s my first day at Heartland and I’m meeting with Pat Murphy the relationship guru, the partnership guru at Heartland Payment Systems. What do you tell me? What’s the first thing I need to do to go out and develop a relationship with a banker?

The first thing is, is just to find the banker, to find the type of person that is going to be the type of person that will refer business to us on a regular basis. A lot of times our sales team comes to me and thinks they need to go to the president of a bank or a CFO or CEO, someone higher up, but it’s really the people that are, what I call, on our level. The people just like us that wake up each day thinking, “How do I find new customers and how do I keep my existing customers happy?” Those are the type of people that we want to connect with. That could be branch managers, it could be commercial lenders, business development officers, cash managers, those are the type of people that we have the best relationships at the bank.

Where we usually tell our reps to start with is by asking their own customers. When we sign up a new customer we have to ask them for a voided check so we have their banking information so we know where to transfer their money to. A good question to ask at that point is just ask them, say, “Hey, I was just wondering, who is it that you work with at that bank, and are you happy with them? The reason why I’m asking is that from time to time customers ask us for a recommendation on a banker and if you’re happy who you work with, I’d like to meet them so I could introduce myself to them and learn a little bit more about their business.” It’s a good ice breaking question to get us to the right person, because if the customer’s happy with that person at the bank, usually that means that person at the bank is doing a good job and would be a good person for us to network with.

Okay, so I get it, I get to the right person in the bank, and Heartland has a couple of great solutions that a banker can help me sell, they can help me with card processing which is credit card processing, they can help me with payroll solutions. I get to the right person at the bank. How do I get them to give me some business, Pat?

Well, the best way is to lead with what’s most important to them personally. Obviously, I just mentioned, one of their greatest concerns is, “How do I get more business at my bank?” A lot of other vendors to the bank lead with their products and their services and are trying to get business from them, so we teach our sales team to not lead with our distinctions, which are great, but lead with what’s most important to the banker, and that is, how do they get more business. When we talk to that customer and they give us the name of, let’s say, their branch manager, I’d recommend that our sales team goes to that bank in person just to show that they’re hands on, they’re local, they’re professional, the person at the bank can see them for themselves and shake their hand and see that they’re a real person in the local community.

I’d introduce them very sincerely and upfront with what they’re looking for. Usually goes something like this, “Hi, my name is Pat Murphy, I work with Heartland Payment Systems. We’ve got several customers in common here in the local area, and from what they tell me, you folks do a great job. We’re actually looking for a local bank in the area to recommend to our customers and I’d like to learn a little bit more about you and what you do here at the bank so we can hopefully refer some business to you.” You’re leading with bringing them business and what hard working bank manager is going to say no to that? When we approach potential bank partners one of the biggest objections that comes up is, “Hey, we’re all set, we’re under contract, we’re happy with who we’re with.” If you’re leading with that approach that I just talked about, to bring them business, then that objection can’t come up, I can’t imagine any objections that would come up.

No, that’s amazing. I love that approach, it’s fantastic. Do you find that the sales folks are skeptical because that’s going to take a little bit longer?

It is, but we’re clear with them too, the rewards of working with a strong partner such as a bank are great, because banks have a great deal of influence over the business decisions of their customers. When we get a referral from a banker it is usually a slam dunk deal that we can close on the first appointment and it generally holds higher margin, what we call, on each deal, rather than maybe more of a tighter deal that we may get through cold calling. If they have the patience and I guess, the resilience, again, to cultivate that relationship, and it may take a year to do so, they may get some referrals along the way, but the time it takes to build up their trust and maybe write out any contract that they might be in, the rewards are usually great and we do have excellent results from our bank partners and they’re really going once they come on board with us.

You present the results to the sales folks and you say, “Listen, you can work five banks over the course of a month and those five banks, a year from now, will make up probably 90% of your business, because they’re each going to give you, in a year’s time they’re each going to give you a half dozen to a dozen referrals each month. While you’re out there looking for five more banks you’re getting that business coming in and you’re just maintaining one relationship to get those additional sales opportunities.

Right, we look at it, particularly with a bank, there are many referral sources within the bank, if you look at a typical bank branch, and I know bank branches are kind of scaled back a little lately, but typical branch there’s probably eight customer facing employees at that bank branch. We always say, if you want to get to the point where you know who all the customer facing employees are and they know who you are and they know how you can help their customers, then we’ve got a pretty good referral source right there. All those customer-facing employees come into contact with customers in one way or another, whether it’s just accepting their cash deposits, whether it’s renegotiating their loan. One way or another they could potentially find some pain points that that customer is having, that they could get us in there to resolve. Our goal is a minimum of one deal per bank branch, but if you’re working it very heavily, there’s a lot of potential referral sources within that branch.

Wow, I love leading with giving the bank business first in order to get referrals from them. I think that’s a fantastic opportunity, it’s a key learning element for those of you out there who could benefit, who are in business to business and could benefit from referrals from bankers. You get in, you meet the right person at the bank and then you say to the bank, “Hey, Mr. Banker, I’ve got half a dozen, I’ve got 20 people I want to introduce you to all of them, can give you business. Who do you think would be most valuable to you first?” The banker picks a person, you take them out to lunch or you go for coffee or you bring the banker to that guy’s office or bring the client to the banker, they start doing business, you immediately become a valuable person the banker. What’s he going to want to do? He’s going to want to give business back to you. That is a fantastic nugget, it’s a great takeaway and it’s an awesome way for us to conclude this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show.

Pat, if our listeners want to reach out to you, because they want to work for Heartland and make a ton of money and be so successful they can go out and have seven, eight, nine kids if they want, how can they get a hold of you? What’s the best way for our listeners to reach out to you if they want to?

Well, they could obviously, for information about our company, go to our website which is HeartlandPaymentSystems.com. They could also reach me, I’m on LinkedIn and Facebook, but my email address is Patrick.Murphy@e-hps.com. My direct phone number is area code 603 387-3493.

Give us the email one more time, please.

Patrick P-A-T-R-I-C-K and a dot, M-U-R-P-H-Y @e, and a hyphen, hps.com.

Fantastic, Pat, thank you so much for being a guest on our show today. You provided us with immeasurable value and I am grateful as always for your friendship all these years and for joining us. Thank you to the wonderful and talented Nancy Pop for being the best producer on the planet. Thanks to all of you for listening. Until next time, I’m hoping you make a great living and live a great life.

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On this episode of the Sixty Second Sales Show we welcome Pat Murphy from Heartland Payment Systems. Pat is an expert on relationship-based sales and he gives us the inside scoop on making more money with relationships. On this episode of the Sixty Second Sales Show we welcome Pat Murphy from Heartland Payment Systems. Pat is an expert on relationship-based sales and he gives us the inside scoop on making more money with relationships.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript for this episode:<br /> <br /> Hi there, and welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo, and we've got a fantastic show for you today. Today we're talking about relationships, that's right, you know that the 60 Second Sale is basically love at first sight for businesses when you connect with someone and you have that instant spark, that spark that connects you and the other person and you know you're going to do business together, that is the essence of the 60 Second Sale. Well, we're going to take it beyond love at first sight. Today we're going to talk about how you can improve your sales process by deepening your relationships with your clients. I know, if you're listening to this, you're used to kicking in doors and connecting with people through brute force, by telling them what you have to offer and showing them how great it's going to be for them and demonstrating to them the power of the solution that you provide. That's fine, if you're doing that now I don't want you to stop doing that yet.<br /> <br /> What I'm going to do today is I'm going to demonstrate to you that relationships, powerful relationships are more valuable than the relationships you make when you kick in doors, sell your services and move on. Our focus is on lifetime value, delivering value over the course of your lifetime to your clients, and they in turn will deliver value to you in the form of financial compensation. Of course, before we get into anything, I need to welcome in and offer my thanks and appreciation to everybody's favorite burka wearing producer, Nancy Pop. Good morning Nancy, how are you today?<br /> <br /> Good morning Dave. I'm good. How are you?<br /> <br /> Awesome. It is great as always to have you hear. I'm doing fine. Thanks for asking. We have a special guest today, but before we introduce him, Nancy, I want to tell you a little story, I want to tell everyone a little story. This weekend was a beautiful weekend here just south of Tamiami Trail in Miami-Dade County, Florida. We had a baseball game with my son on Saturday and then on Sunday I went through the list, the list of things that my wife had for me to do around the house. On that list was a project that I absolutely cannot stand, it's the project ... Well, I'll tell you what happened. In the front of my house we have this fountain. It's this stone structure that has a little pump in it and it spits water out the top and the water overflows from one bowl into the next. It looks good and it sounds good, I guess people think it sounds good, if I stand next to it too long it makes me have to go pee, but that's a different story for a different time.<br /> <br /> Anyway, the fountain out in front of the house as broken, and the thing about this project is, if you call a plumber, a plumber is not going to come out and fix the fountain, he's just not going to do it, it's not a big enough job for a plumber and it's not really a plumbing job. If you call a handyman, a handyman's going to give you a really hard time about doing this job because the structure of the fountain itself, it's stone, these pieces of stone are anywhere between 25 pounds and 150 pounds, the base I think is well over 300 pounds, and they have to be lifted up, you've got to take the thing apart in order to get to the pump.<br /> <br /> I fixed this once before, I fixed it six months ago and I went through the whole process of calling plumbers, calling handymen, the pool guy, nobody will fix this stupid fountain. We have company coming in the next couple of weeks. As we're recording this this is the middle of November, the holiday season is around the corner, but my son's birthday is on the 20th of November and ... Dave Lorenzo clean 31:08
Stop The Anger https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/14/stop-anger/ Mon, 14 Nov 2016 17:00:03 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=1099 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/14/stop-anger/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/14/stop-anger/feed/ 0 Stop the Anger! There is a great deal of anger in the air about the results of the United States Presidential Election last week.  The results aside - people are getting angry at their friends over an opinion about politics.  This has to stop. This show is my brief commentary on the subject.  And I don't pass judgment on anyone. Listen to the big mistake I almost made before coming to my senses. Stop The Anger: Transcript Hey there everyone, it's Dave Lorenzo and this week we're doing something very different. We're doing something very different because we are now in very different times. I'm recording this show two hours before it is scheduled to be released on iTunes. I'm recording it at 10:00 AM on Monday November 14th. Usually we record the show a week in advance. Usually I work on next week's show this week. I did have a show all lined up ready to go today. I recorded it on Wednesday. Nancy Pop, my producer was with me on the show. We had our usual engineer edit it, and it's loaded, and it's ready to go right now. I'm not happy with that show, and I'm not going to let that show air. I'm taking it down. I'm going to tell you the reason why. Last week ... I record the show every week on a Wednesday, and last week I went to record the show on Wednesday and I couldn't do it. I was just off my game. The reason I was off my game is it was the day after the presidential election. I was up all night. I hadn't slept, we record the show at 9:30 in the morning, and I sat down to record it and I was exhausted. My energy level wasn't there, I couldn't do it. I reached out to Nancy and we rescheduled for the next day. I sat down to record the show on Thursday, and the show was reflective of how I felt at the time. I think it was an angry show, it was a show full of negative emotion. Even the title of the show, while controversial and exciting, was just full of energy that I did not want to extend to you. Today it's a few days later. It's not a full week, it's four days after that moment. It is now almost a full week since the presidential election in the United States, in which Donald Trump was elected president. I don't want to spread that hate, and I'm not going to. My politics is obvious, those of you who know me know my politics. You know how I feel about things, you know which way I lean. I try to understand everyone's point of view. The simple fact of the matter is we now have a president of the United States who has been duly elected. The election was fair, the election was done by the rules. There's no controversy surrounding the specifics, the mechanics of the electoral process that put Donald Trump in the position of being president-elect of the United States. We have a peaceful transition of power here in the US. That is a demonstration of our democracy. Now, I did not vote for Donald Trump. Those of you listening, some of you may have voted for him, and that's great. I salute you for getting out and voting, I salute you for the victory of your candidate. The people I've talked to who voted for Donald Trump, it makes sense to me. I understand why those folks voted for him. That's fine. I don't believe that your vote for a candidate is something that makes you, that puts you in a specific class. If you voted for Hillary Clinton, I don't think that makes you someone who is a socialist who wants 80% tax, and wants everything to be free for everyone. That's not my feeling about people who voted for Hillary Clinton. Just like if you voted for Donald Trump, I don't think you agree necessarily, with everything that has been attributed to Donald Trump. I didn't say everything Donald Trump said, I said everything that's been attributed to Donald Trump. I'm not passing judgment on anyone for anything. What I am going to do moving forward is I'm going to respect the office of the president of the United Sates. I'm going to give Donald Trump the chance to be successful. I'm going to judge him based upon his actions in office.... Stop the Anger!

There is a great deal of anger in the air about the results of the United States Presidential Election last week.  The results aside – people are getting angry at their friends over an opinion about politics.  This has to stop.

This show is my brief commentary on the subject.  And I don’t pass judgment on anyone.

Listen to the big mistake I almost made before coming to my senses.

Stop The Anger: Transcript

Hey there everyone, it’s Dave Lorenzo and this week we’re doing something very different. We’re doing something very different because we are now in very different times. I’m recording this show two hours before it is scheduled to be released on iTunes. I’m recording it at 10:00 AM on Monday November 14th. Usually we record the show a week in advance. Usually I work on next week’s show this week. I did have a show all lined up ready to go today. I recorded it on Wednesday. Nancy Pop, my producer was with me on the show. We had our usual engineer edit it, and it’s loaded, and it’s ready to go right now. I’m not happy with that show, and I’m not going to let that show air. I’m taking it down.

I’m going to tell you the reason why. Last week … I record the show every week on a Wednesday, and last week I went to record the show on Wednesday and I couldn’t do it. I was just off my game. The reason I was off my game is it was the day after the presidential election. I was up all night. I hadn’t slept, we record the show at 9:30 in the morning, and I sat down to record it and I was exhausted. My energy level wasn’t there, I couldn’t do it. I reached out to Nancy and we rescheduled for the next day. I sat down to record the show on Thursday, and the show was reflective of how I felt at the time. I think it was an angry show, it was a show full of negative emotion. Even the title of the show, while controversial and exciting, was just full of energy that I did not want to extend to you.

Today it’s a few days later. It’s not a full week, it’s four days after that moment. It is now almost a full week since the presidential election in the United States, in which Donald Trump was elected president. I don’t want to spread that hate, and I’m not going to. My politics is obvious, those of you who know me know my politics. You know how I feel about things, you know which way I lean. I try to understand everyone’s point of view. The simple fact of the matter is we now have a president of the United States who has been duly elected. The election was fair, the election was done by the rules. There’s no controversy surrounding the specifics, the mechanics of the electoral process that put Donald Trump in the position of being president-elect of the United States. We have a peaceful transition of power here in the US. That is a demonstration of our democracy.

Now, I did not vote for Donald Trump. Those of you listening, some of you may have voted for him, and that’s great. I salute you for getting out and voting, I salute you for the victory of your candidate. The people I’ve talked to who voted for Donald Trump, it makes sense to me. I understand why those folks voted for him. That’s fine. I don’t believe that your vote for a candidate is something that makes you, that puts you in a specific class. If you voted for Hillary Clinton, I don’t think that makes you someone who is a socialist who wants 80% tax, and wants everything to be free for everyone. That’s not my feeling about people who voted for Hillary Clinton.

Just like if you voted for Donald Trump, I don’t think you agree necessarily, with everything that has been attributed to Donald Trump. I didn’t say everything Donald Trump said, I said everything that’s been attributed to Donald Trump. I’m not passing judgment on anyone for anything. What I am going to do moving forward is I’m going to respect the office of the president of the United Sates. I’m going to give Donald Trump the chance to be successful. I’m going to judge him based upon his actions in office. If he does things I don’t like, I’m going to say that. if he does things that are good, i’m going to say that too.

What we can all do if we want to have an impact is work on the world around us. I have an opportunity to influence a lot of people with this show, with the show I do on Facebook, with the videos I produce, with the content I create, and write, and post on my website. I want to be helpful. I want to help people make a great living, and live a great life. That’s not just a tagline, it’s my mission. It’s what I do. I’m going to volunteer locally. My wife and I are going to volunteer locally to help people. I’m going to become active in causes I believe in, even more active than I am today. I’m going to try and help make the world a better place from this little circle three feet around me now, all the way out as far as it can extend. That’s what I can do.

Being angry, being mad, and criticizing people, that’s not helpful. It’s not going to help me feel any better about losing the election, my candidate losing the election. It’s not going to help me feel any better about the way things move forward. In reality, I can impact the world around me, and you can impact the world around you. To the extent that our two world’s come together, hopefully we can influence on another in a positive way. My friends, the original show that I was going to do today is about how to get along with people who disagree with your opinion. When I listen to it, I found myself going to a place that was unacceptable to me. My anger was transparent. We’re coming up on a time of year, we’re two weeks away from thanksgiving, and we’re six weeks away from the holiday season. That’s not the time to be angry with people, it’s not the time for vitriol, it’s the time to come together and be thankful for what we have. It’s the time to reach out to others, and help others.

Today our podcast, the message from our podcast is go out, and help someone today. Instead of criticizing that person you know who voted a way that you didn’t on Facebook, go out and help that person. Reach out to that person, and offer to do something for them. If you voted right, left, or center, find somebody who voted opposite of you and reach out to them. Understand their point of view, and do something, do a random act of kindness for that person. Buy them a candy bar, send them flowers, send a case of beer over to their house, and don’t sign it. Just send it over. You know why? It will make you feel better about you. Once you feel better about yourself, you can feel better about everything else in the world around you.

Until next week when we’re back with another great hard hitting sales focused show, I’m Dave Lorenzo. I hope you go out today and make a great living, and live a great life.

]]> Stop the Anger! There is a great deal of anger in the air about the results of the United States Presidential Election last week.  The results aside - people are getting angry at their friends over an opinion about politics.  This has to stop. Stop the Anger!<br /> <br /> There is a great deal of anger in the air about the results of the United States Presidential Election last week.  The results aside - people are getting angry at their friends over an opinion about politics.  This has to stop.<br /> <br /> This show is my brief commentary on the subject.  And I don't pass judgment on anyone.<br /> <br /> Listen to the big mistake I almost made before coming to my senses.<br /> Stop The Anger: Transcript<br /> Hey there everyone, it's Dave Lorenzo and this week we're doing something very different. We're doing something very different because we are now in very different times. I'm recording this show two hours before it is scheduled to be released on iTunes. I'm recording it at 10:00 AM on Monday November 14th. Usually we record the show a week in advance. Usually I work on next week's show this week. I did have a show all lined up ready to go today. I recorded it on Wednesday. Nancy Pop, my producer was with me on the show. We had our usual engineer edit it, and it's loaded, and it's ready to go right now. I'm not happy with that show, and I'm not going to let that show air. I'm taking it down.<br /> <br /> I'm going to tell you the reason why. Last week ... I record the show every week on a Wednesday, and last week I went to record the show on Wednesday and I couldn't do it. I was just off my game. The reason I was off my game is it was the day after the presidential election. I was up all night. I hadn't slept, we record the show at 9:30 in the morning, and I sat down to record it and I was exhausted. My energy level wasn't there, I couldn't do it. I reached out to Nancy and we rescheduled for the next day. I sat down to record the show on Thursday, and the show was reflective of how I felt at the time. I think it was an angry show, it was a show full of negative emotion. Even the title of the show, while controversial and exciting, was just full of energy that I did not want to extend to you.<br /> <br /> Today it's a few days later. It's not a full week, it's four days after that moment. It is now almost a full week since the presidential election in the United States, in which Donald Trump was elected president. I don't want to spread that hate, and I'm not going to. My politics is obvious, those of you who know me know my politics. You know how I feel about things, you know which way I lean. I try to understand everyone's point of view. The simple fact of the matter is we now have a president of the United States who has been duly elected. The election was fair, the election was done by the rules. There's no controversy surrounding the specifics, the mechanics of the electoral process that put Donald Trump in the position of being president-elect of the United States. We have a peaceful transition of power here in the US. That is a demonstration of our democracy.<br /> <br /> Now, I did not vote for Donald Trump. Those of you listening, some of you may have voted for him, and that's great. I salute you for getting out and voting, I salute you for the victory of your candidate. The people I've talked to who voted for Donald Trump, it makes sense to me. I understand why those folks voted for him. That's fine. I don't believe that your vote for a candidate is something that makes you, that puts you in a specific class. If you voted for Hillary Clinton, I don't think that makes you someone who is a socialist who wants 80% tax, and wants everything to be free for everyone. That's not my feeling about people who voted for Hillary Clinton.<br /> <br /> Just like if you voted for Donald Trump, I don't think you agree necessarily, with everything that has been attributed to Donald Trump. I didn't say everything Donald Trump said, I said everything that's been attributed to Donald Trump. I'm not passing judgment on anyone for anything. What I am going to do moving forward is I'm going to respect the office of the president of the United Sates. Dave Lorenzo clean 9:15 How to Build a Body of Work https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/07/body-of-work/ Mon, 07 Nov 2016 17:00:51 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=909 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/07/body-of-work/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/11/07/body-of-work/feed/ 0 Your body of work helps reinforce your expertise. If you want to be perceived as an expert, you must have a substantial body of work behind you to support you. This podcast is a clinic on developing a body of work to help position you as an expert. Here is the transcript of this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show: Welcome to another edition of the Sixty Second Sales Show. I'm your Host, Dave Lorenzo. Today we've got a great topic for you. It is in response to a question, and our topic today, and the title of today's show is How To Create a Body of Work. Now I know that sounds a little, well, it should sound intriguing to you, and we're going to get into why it should be intriguing to you as someone who sells things to people. Either you're a business owner or a sales professional and you need to create a body of work. We'll talk about that in just a moment. I want to welcome back in our fantastic Producer, Nancy Pop. Hi, Nancy. How are you today? Hey, Dave. I'm good. Nancy, in case you don't know, folks, she is a big supporter of women's rights and right now she is producing the show, Supporting Women's Education in Afghanistan, and wearing a fine burka. Nancy, why don't you explain to the folks out there why you choose to dress in traditional Afghani wear? Actually just, you could just tell them why I'm actually saying this. This is kind of a joke. Nancy, fill people in on what the joke is. It's so funny. Last week when we were recording our podcast, when we finished, David goes, "Oh, your sound. It sounds so good today. What are you doing differently? I had a blanket wrapped around me and my computer, so that none of the sound escaped, and you made a joke where you're like, "Oh, the burka must look really beautiful on you." Nancy is in support of women's rights in Afghanistan. She's going to wear, she's going to continue to wear this burka for the rest of the month while record the podcast, so Nancy, I'm glad that you're such an activist, and we all support the rights of women in traditionally oppressed Muslim countries, so thank you for doing that. Thank you. All right, so today we have a great question that is the subject of our show, so Nancy, why don't you go ahead and read the question. Tell us who it's from and what it's about. Yes, so today's question is from Pete Markum. He's from Bellevue, Washington, and he asks, "Dave, I sell generators to businesses and home owners. I compete with Costco, Home Depot, and every hardware, and commercial supply store. How do I break through the noise and get people to pay me 20% more for something they can just about, they can get just about anywhere?" All right. Great question, Pete. Thank you, so today's topic is How To Create a Body of Work, and this goes right to Pete's question, so here's what you need to do, Pete. You have to become the most renowned expert on generators in the world. You have to be the guy people go to when they're trying to buy a generator. Now I live in South Florida, and living in South Florida, I know a thing or two about generators and generator sales, so I'm so glad you asked this question. I can really help you with this, but if you're out there right now and you sell medical supplies, or you're out there right now and you're a pharmaceutical rep, or you're a realtor, or a CPA, or a lawyer, or you sell anything, this is going to help you. Our focus with the Sixty Second Sales System is developing lifetime value and the way to do that is to get people to seek you out first. I'm going to say that again. I hate cold calling. This is a no cold call system. I think cold calling is a waste of time. It's annoying. People can't stand you and I think anybody that advocates cold calling is doing you a disservice. It is so much better for you to go out there and introduce yourself to the world as an expert, and have people beat down your door to come and get what you have to offer, which is the information. The valuable information. Your body of work helps reinforce your expertise. If you want to be perceived as an expert, you must have a substantial body of work behind you to support you.

This podcast is a clinic on developing a body of work to help position you as an expert.

Here is the transcript of this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show:

Welcome to another edition of the Sixty Second Sales Show. I’m your Host, Dave Lorenzo. Today we’ve got a great topic for you. It is in response to a question, and our topic today, and the title of today’s show is How To Create a Body of Work. Now I know that sounds a little, well, it should sound intriguing to you, and we’re going to get into why it should be intriguing to you as someone who sells things to people. Either you’re a business owner or a sales professional and you need to create a body of work. We’ll talk about that in just a moment. I want to welcome back in our fantastic Producer, Nancy Pop. Hi, Nancy. How are you today?

Hey, Dave. I’m good.

Nancy, in case you don’t know, folks, she is a big supporter of women’s rights and right now she is producing the show, Supporting Women’s Education in Afghanistan, and wearing a fine burka. Nancy, why don’t you explain to the folks out there why you choose to dress in traditional Afghani wear? Actually just, you could just tell them why I’m actually saying this. This is kind of a joke. Nancy, fill people in on what the joke is.

It’s so funny. Last week when we were recording our podcast, when we finished, David goes, “Oh, your sound. It sounds so good today. What are you doing differently? I had a blanket wrapped around me and my computer, so that none of the sound escaped, and you made a joke where you’re like, “Oh, the burka must look really beautiful on you.”

Nancy is in support of women’s rights in Afghanistan. She’s going to wear, she’s going to continue to wear this burka for the rest of the month while record the podcast, so Nancy, I’m glad that you’re such an activist, and we all support the rights of women in traditionally oppressed Muslim countries, so thank you for doing that.

Thank you.

All right, so today we have a great question that is the subject of our show, so Nancy, why don’t you go ahead and read the question. Tell us who it’s from and what it’s about.

Yes, so today’s question is from Pete Markum. He’s from Bellevue, Washington, and he asks, “Dave, I sell generators to businesses and home owners. I compete with Costco, Home Depot, and every hardware, and commercial supply store. How do I break through the noise and get people to pay me 20% more for something they can just about, they can get just about anywhere?”

All right. Great question, Pete. Thank you, so today’s topic is How To Create a Body of Work, and this goes right to Pete’s question, so here’s what you need to do, Pete. You have to become the most renowned expert on generators in the world. You have to be the guy people go to when they’re trying to buy a generator. Now I live in South Florida, and living in South Florida, I know a thing or two about generators and generator sales, so I’m so glad you asked this question.

I can really help you with this, but if you’re out there right now and you sell medical supplies, or you’re out there right now and you’re a pharmaceutical rep, or you’re a realtor, or a CPA, or a lawyer, or you sell anything, this is going to help you. Our focus with the Sixty Second Sales System is developing lifetime value and the way to do that is to get people to seek you out first. I’m going to say that again. I hate cold calling. This is a no cold call system. I think cold calling is a waste of time. It’s annoying. People can’t stand you and I think anybody that advocates cold calling is doing you a disservice.

It is so much better for you to go out there and introduce yourself to the world as an expert, and have people beat down your door to come and get what you have to offer, which is the information. The valuable information. What you’re going to hear time and time again from these sales gurus is, “You got to kick down every door. You got to go out there and pound on doors. Pound on a hundred doors. You got one inquiry, they’re going to say yes, and that makes it all worthwhile.” No. That doesn’t make it all worthwhile. That makes you tired. That makes you frustrated. That makes you annoyed and that’s a terrible way to go through life. Don’t spend your time cold calling. Don’t listen to those people who tell you that, “Cold calling is just a fact of life.”

There’s an expression that Zig Ziglar used to use all the time. He used to say, “It’s not cold calling. It’s warm approaching.” That’s just crap. I mean, I love Zig and I love his stuff, and you should go out and buy as much Zig Ziglar stuff as you can get your hands on, but cold calling is over. There is so many ways that people have now to get information. There are so many ways you can put yourself out there as an expert, that to be sought out, that you should never ever cold call again. You become an expert first and foremost by creating a body of work. What do I mean by that?

All right, so we’re going to take Pete and his question, so Pete, here’s what you’re going to do. You sell generators, and as you said, “Generators are available at Costco, in Sam’s Club, in Home Depot. You can get a generator anywhere,” and there’s places online you can buy generators. Pete, I don’t know, maybe you own an online generator company, or I’m just assuming since you said you sold to corporate, and you sold to home owners, that you’re out there going out and trying to sell generators one at a time. That’s fine.

Here’s what I want you to do. First thing I want you to do is I want you to go and I want you to set up a blog. Just go to wordpress.com, or wordpress.org, whatever the site is. Google WordPress. Set up a WordPress blog and I want you to start writing articles about selecting generators. Write articles about generators all day long. Well, every day write one article. The goal for you is to become the expert on generators and the way to do that is by publishing great information. By talking about generators all day long. By educating people on how to buy a generator. By educating people on energy efficiency regarding generators. By educating people on safe use of generators during a storm. By educating people. Educating is the main word. You go out and you start producing great content on generator selection, on educating people about generators, and people will begin to seek you out. Now writing is not enough. You have to do other things, so I’m going to break it down for you into a specific thought leadership system.

You’re going to start with the written word. The reason that I have you start with writing articles and posting them on a blog is because the way you write is the way you think. I want you to organize your thoughts and here’s how you do that. I want you to create eight main themes. Eight main themes, so theme number one may be generators and safety. Theme number two may be generators and energy efficiency. Theme number three, how to select a generator. Theme number four is use of generators during business, use of generators for business purposes. You get the idea. Now I have eight themes in my business. I’ve done this for years, and the eight themes that I’m using in sales are, I’ll give them to you so that you can see.

I’ll be completely transparent. Number one, create expert status. In order to draw people to you, that’s what we’re talking about today, you got to create expert status. Number two, lead with education. “We offer great education content.” Number three, offer value first, so if you are a salesperson, I want you to offer value first. These are all themes that I use in my writing. Number four, think lifetime relationship value. Think about lifetime relationships. Number five, stay in touch. Number six, options close deals. Number seven, mindset matters, and number eight, your attitude about money is important to your sales.

Those are the eight themes that I have, and what I do in my writing is I create a content calendar, and I write five different topics down about each of these eight themes, so that will give me forty articles. Five topics, eight themes, five topics per theme, forty articles. That’s two months of articles that I can post on my blog, but that’s not, I don’t stop there when it comes to writing to create thought leadership. By the way, thought leadership is another name for expert status.

We’re creating expert status, so Pete, if you do this, you will become the premier expert in generators, the world over. Okay. You’ve got eight themes. You’ve got five topics per theme. You write an article for each topic. You schedule them to go out each day on your blog. That’s not all you do with them. You take each article and you send it out one week at a time in a weekly email newsletter. Weekly email newsletter, and that newsletter goes to everyone in your database. Now you’re thinking, “Dave, what’s a database? We’ve never talked about a database.” You know at least 250 people. Pete, I’m sure you know more than that, because you’ve been in business for a while. You know at least 250 people. All those people go on a list. They get an email from you every day, every week, and that email educates them on generators and the use of generators, so you, in their mind, are the expert on generators, because they’re getting content from you each week on generators.

The next you thing you do is once a month, you send out a print newsletter. You take four of your articles, you put them all together, and you go to a printer, local print shop. You have those newsletters printed up. You put an offer in there, what generator you’re running on special now, and you send it out to your top 100 clients. Your top 200 clients. However many you can afford to send them to. This print newsletter reinforces what they’ve read online. Sometimes it’s a different audience. In fact, most of the time, different audience. Print, email, newsletter. The next thing I want you to do is I want you to create some sort of a video tutorial on how to buy a generator. How to use a generator.

Your eight themes, I want you to do five different topics on video. Videos are short, less than a couple minutes long, and you’re covering videos on generators. How to start them, how to change the oil, how to put in spark plugs, all that stuff. All this content is going on your website, so Pete, even if you’re an independent sales professional, you’re creating your own blog, you work for another company, or you rep fifty different generator lines. I want you to be the generator expert, so what you’re doing is you’re putting all this information out there, and then everyone who knows you now, knows you as the generator expert.

Then I want you to do events, and I want you to do an event where you invite everybody in town who’s a construction foreperson. I want you to invite everyone in town who’s a trades person. I want you to invite everyone in town who owns a small business to come to an event you do once a quarter, and at this event, you’re going to either offer a breakfast, or a lunch, or maybe you offer a couple of drinks, and you do a BBQ, or you have some light food, and you educate people on what’s going on in the community, the safe use of power. Maybe you have a guest speaker come from the local utility company and then you have four or five different generator models there, and you tell people why it’s important that every home should have a generator, and how business people can use the new model of generator more efficiently than the old model.

What you’re doing is you’re doing an event with a guest speaker that will draw them in, and by the way, local politicians are great guest speakers. I’ve done events with people where I speak on teaching people to sell and then you sell generators. You talk about generators for five minutes after I speak, people do that all the time. You can coordinate with other people who have a topic that is interesting to draw people in. You do this once or twice a year. I have some clients who do it once a quarter, and people will come, and you’ll be known as the Generator Guy. This makes you an expert. Your content makes you an expert. People will flock to you. All right.

I want you to use as many forms of media as you can. I love video. I love the written word. You know I love podcasts, because I’m doing a podcast now. You could do the Safe Energy Podcast, and you could talk about generators for two or three minutes, and then just interview other people for business purposes, that would draw people in, and your content would be, your content would be great, and people would say, “You know what? His content is great and he talks about these generators once a month. I need to buy one of them, because I need to keep my family, I need to keep power on when the storms come.”

The final point I’m going to make along these lines is you need to act like an expert. You need to act like an expert, so when you’re out there talking about your product or your service, I want you to tell people what to do, and not hedge. When somebody comes to you and they’re talking about buying a generator, what do you tell them? “Listen, you don’t need a 6,000 watt generator. You need a 10,000 watt generator.” “I would never buy this model, because it’s cheap. It’s made in China. It’s crap. I would buy this model, because it’s made here, in the United States.” “I would buy this model because it has a Honda engine, and Honda engines are the most reliable.”

Act like an expert. Tell people. You also have to be interesting. Keep generators interesting and entertaining. Find a way to spice them up a little bit. Make people interested in what you have to say. Talk about your clients who buy generators. Do you have a controversial client? “I sold a generator last week to an adult bookstore. Can you imagine? People need to go out and buy adult books when they don’t have power? Well, it makes sense, because what else are they going to do? They’re going to read adult books. They’re going to watch adult films. I got to keep the power on in the store.” That’s interesting. Be interesting. Make what you do interesting. Be a little controversial. You have to be controversial in order to keep things going, so look online, read some articles written by other people who are trying to sell generators, and attack them. Take them apart.

I just did this at the beginning of my podcast today for this business. I told you, “Cold calling sucks,” because I really believe cold calling sucks, and there are thousands of people out there trying to get you to cold call right now as a salesperson. I’m being controversial. You should do that, too, in your business. Then finally, don’t back off. When people challenge you, don’t back off. Make sure you can defend your position. Make sure it’s a logical defense, but don’t back off of it. That’s what experts do. Act like an expert. If we can do this with Pete for generators, you can do this in any business, and I’m not saying that to put Pete down, but as he said in his question, “Generators are a commodity.” You can get a generator anywhere, but Pete is going to be the Generator Expert. People are going to buy generators from him, because he knows what he’s talking about, and when he recommends a generator to you, he’s got your best interests at heart. That’s what people are going to believe about Pete, because he’s the Generator Expert.

 

Here’s your action item for this week. I want you to think about your business in a different way. I want you to think about yourself as an expert and I want you to present your business as an expert recommendation. Instead of going out there and selling what you’re selling because you were thrust into this role, create the expertise by establishing a body of work, and use that body of work to bolster your expert status. Then your expert status will not only attract people to you, but it also differentiates you from everyone else who does what you do. If you sell medical devices, if you sell pharmaceutical products, if you sell homes as a realtor, or a real estate agent, if you’re a CPA, if you’re a lawyer, you have to pick an area, seize upon it, create that expert status, build up your body of work, and people will be drawn to you magnetically.

My friends, this is so much better than cold calling. It works out so much better for you, because people come to you, and they’re predisposed to buying what you have to offer, because you’re no longer selling. You’re making an expert recommendation. I want to let you know about a couple of things and we discussed this topic actually today, and the first thing that I want to let you know about, starting yesterday, I started a, you’re listening to this now on Monday. In the beginning, on a Monday in the beginning of November, as of November 1, I started doing a Facebook Live show everyday on my Facebook page at 8:30 a.m. I talked a little bit about this topic. I covered it in just a little bit of detail.

I didn’t go into it nearly as much detail as here, and I talked about some different things on the Facebook show today, so head over to Facebook.com/thedavelorenzo. Facebook.com/thedavelorenzo. Make sure you click on that Like button, so that my daily show appears in your newsfeed. We’re doing the show from all different kinds of places. I’m on the road actually tomorrow, so when you listen to this, you’re going to go back, and you’re going to look, and you’re going to see me like in a car somewhere, or on the side of the road. I have to go see a client, so I’ll be on the road tomorrow, and you can watch where I do the show from.

All kinds of crazy things can happen. You can also ask me questions on the Facebook Live show, it’s interactive, so if you have a question, just pop it in there, and I’ll answer it while I’m on Facebook Live. That’s one of the new things I’m doing. Also on Twitter, I’m putting out some great information every day and I interact with people all the time on Twitter. You can find me at twitter.com/thedavelorenzo. If you’re sensing a theme there, you’re super smart, because just about all my social media is thedavelorenzo. Finally on Instagram, I do one minute videos all the time. The one minute videos cover a topic that’s interesting. I also post funny pictures of things I see all over the place. Cool stuff, interesting stuff, sometimes a little political stuff.

My Instagram handle is, of course, thedavelorenzo. All those social media outlets are available to you. We’re constantly exploring and experimenting with new stuff all the time. Everything we do, the central hub for information, is my website, and of course, my website is davelorenzo.com. That’s my name. Davelorenzo.com. Go there. Under Content is this podcast, of course, as well as articles over, as of today, over 140 articles, and the website just went live a couple of months ago, so we’ve got 140 articles up there. We’ve got videos. All kinds of videos. We got all kinds of stuff. Dancing bears, juggling clowns, barking dogs, you name it. We got it on the website. Good stuff. Great pictures of me. You can print them out and pin them up on your wall, if you want. Anyhow, thank you very much for listening, folks, and Pete, thank you so much for your question. It was a great question today. Nancy Pop, thank you for being the Best Producer in the World, and thank you for all you do for the Muslim community of women out there.

My pleasure.

We will speak with all of you next week, right here on the Sixty Second Sales Show. Until then, bye bye.

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Your body of work helps reinforce your expertise. If you want to be perceived as an expert, you must have a substantial body of work behind you to support you. This podcast is a clinic on developing a body of work to help position you as an expert. Your body of work helps reinforce your expertise. If you want to be perceived as an expert, you must have a substantial body of work behind you to support you.<br /> <br /> This podcast is a clinic on developing a body of work to help position you as an expert.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript of this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show:<br /> <br /> Welcome to another edition of the Sixty Second Sales Show. I'm your Host, Dave Lorenzo. Today we've got a great topic for you. It is in response to a question, and our topic today, and the title of today's show is How To Create a Body of Work. Now I know that sounds a little, well, it should sound intriguing to you, and we're going to get into why it should be intriguing to you as someone who sells things to people. Either you're a business owner or a sales professional and you need to create a body of work. We'll talk about that in just a moment. I want to welcome back in our fantastic Producer, Nancy Pop. Hi, Nancy. How are you today?<br /> <br /> Hey, Dave. I'm good.<br /> <br /> Nancy, in case you don't know, folks, she is a big supporter of women's rights and right now she is producing the show, Supporting Women's Education in Afghanistan, and wearing a fine burka. Nancy, why don't you explain to the folks out there why you choose to dress in traditional Afghani wear? Actually just, you could just tell them why I'm actually saying this. This is kind of a joke. Nancy, fill people in on what the joke is.<br /> <br /> It's so funny. Last week when we were recording our podcast, when we finished, David goes, "Oh, your sound. It sounds so good today. What are you doing differently? I had a blanket wrapped around me and my computer, so that none of the sound escaped, and you made a joke where you're like, "Oh, the burka must look really beautiful on you."<br /> <br /> Nancy is in support of women's rights in Afghanistan. She's going to wear, she's going to continue to wear this burka for the rest of the month while record the podcast, so Nancy, I'm glad that you're such an activist, and we all support the rights of women in traditionally oppressed Muslim countries, so thank you for doing that.<br /> <br /> Thank you.<br /> <br /> All right, so today we have a great question that is the subject of our show, so Nancy, why don't you go ahead and read the question. Tell us who it's from and what it's about.<br /> <br /> Yes, so today's question is from Pete Markum. He's from Bellevue, Washington, and he asks, "Dave, I sell generators to businesses and home owners. I compete with Costco, Home Depot, and every hardware, and commercial supply store. How do I break through the noise and get people to pay me 20% more for something they can just about, they can get just about anywhere?"<br /> <br /> All right. Great question, Pete. Thank you, so today's topic is How To Create a Body of Work, and this goes right to Pete's question, so here's what you need to do, Pete. You have to become the most renowned expert on generators in the world. You have to be the guy people go to when they're trying to buy a generator. Now I live in South Florida, and living in South Florida, I know a thing or two about generators and generator sales, so I'm so glad you asked this question.<br /> <br /> I can really help you with this, but if you're out there right now and you sell medical supplies, or you're out there right now and you're a pharmaceutical rep, or you're a realtor, or a CPA, or a lawyer, or you sell anything, this is going to help you. Our focus with the Sixty Second Sales System is developing lifetime value and the way to do that is to get people to seek you out first. I'm going to say that again. I hate cold calling. This is a no cold call system. I think cold calling is a waste of time. It's annoying. People can't stand you and I think anybody that advocates cold calling is doing you a disservice.<br /> <br /> It is so much better for you to go out there and introduce yourself to the world... Dave Lorenzo clean 21:06
How To Improve Self-Esteem https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/31/self-esteem/ Mon, 31 Oct 2016 16:00:32 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=890 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/31/self-esteem/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/31/self-esteem/feed/ 0 Self-esteem is the most important aspect of sales. You are who you think you are! If you want to grow your book of business you must think of yourself as the person you want to be. For example: You have two widely different sales years. In year one you close $1 million in new business and take home $200,000 in compensation.  In year 2 you close $2 million in new business and take home $400,000. Are you the $1 million producer or the $2 million producer? Or are you a $10 million producer who is just getting warmed up? You perception of yourself will determine how much you produce next year. In this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we focus on how you can improve your self-esteem and use it to grow your business. Here is the transcript of this episode: Hey, everyone. Welcome to another edition of The 60 Second Sales Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo and with me I have my partner in distributing fantastic information. I know you think I was going to say my partner in crime, but no crime will be committed here today. My partner in distributing fantastic information, Nancy Pop. Hi, Nancy. How are you? Hi, Dave. I'm doing good. How about you? I'm doing great, thanks. Today we're going to kick off with a great question and it's something that is so important. I can't even begin to tell you how important this is. Nancy, read the question we got from my friend, Edwin, in Titusville and then we'll talk a little bit about the concept that Edwin raises today. Today's question is from Edwin Allen from Titusville, Florida. He says, "Dave, I lost my best client a couple of weeks ago and I'm really down. How do I get my confidence back?" This is probably the most important thing ... The most important factor in business is your self-esteem. Think about that for a minute. When we think about business, we think about funding. We think about finances and how to have the money we need to get things done, but really that's not the most important factor in business. The most important factor in business is the self-esteem of the leader. It's the self-esteem of the sales pro who's going out on the front lines everyday looking to make contact with people and introduce the value you provide to new people. In life in general regardless of what you do, you can be a performer, you can be a professional athlete, you can be a performer on stage, you can be someone working in a factory on the assembly line, if you think you are the best person in your role, you will behave consistently with your thoughts. Nancy, has there ever been a time when you wound up having a serious setback and the next thing you knew, you were on top of the world. You went from the lowest of lows to the highest of highs. Has that ever happen to you? Oh, sure. It happens every week.If you don't mind sharing with our audience, tell us a story about when that's happened to you. Tell us first about one of the lows and then tell us about how you came back and one of the highs. Give us the story. Sure. I have many stories of those instances, but I guess one that happened quite often was last year I was a full-time student and I had a full-time job and an internship. For me it was just the struggle of balancing everything. Anytime something bad happened even if it was the smallest thing, my confidence would completely plummet because I would just think to myself, "Why am I not Superwoman? Why can't I do everything and do it perfectly?" I think it's sometimes you expect so much from yourself that the smallest thing that lets you down, you're just going to feel like total crap about yourself. The point that you raised is a good one. When we talk about how to overcome setbacks or how to boost your self-esteem, we choose the view we have of ourselves. You choose to view yourself in any given moment as the person who achieved the highlight of your career or you can choose to view yourself as the person who just got absolutely crushed. Self-esteem is the most important aspect of sales. You are who you think you are!

If you want to grow your book of business you must think of yourself as the person you want to be.

For example:

You have two widely different sales years. In year one you close $1 million in new business and take home $200,000 in compensation.  In year 2 you close $2 million in new business and take home $400,000.

Are you the $1 million producer or the $2 million producer?

Or are you a $10 million producer who is just getting warmed up?

You perception of yourself will determine how much you produce next year.

In this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we focus on how you can improve your self-esteem and use it to grow your business.

Here is the transcript of this episode:

Hey, everyone. Welcome to another edition of The 60 Second Sales Show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo and with me I have my partner in distributing fantastic information. I know you think I was going to say my partner in crime, but no crime will be committed here today. My partner in distributing fantastic information, Nancy Pop. Hi, Nancy. How are you?

Hi, Dave. I’m doing good. How about you?

I’m doing great, thanks. Today we’re going to kick off with a great question and it’s something that is so important. I can’t even begin to tell you how important this is. Nancy, read the question we got from my friend, Edwin, in Titusville and then we’ll talk a little bit about the concept that Edwin raises today.

Today’s question is from Edwin Allen from Titusville, Florida. He says, “Dave, I lost my best client a couple of weeks ago and I’m really down. How do I get my confidence back?”

This is probably the most important thing … The most important factor in business is your self-esteem. Think about that for a minute. When we think about business, we think about funding. We think about finances and how to have the money we need to get things done, but really that’s not the most important factor in business. The most important factor in business is the self-esteem of the leader. It’s the self-esteem of the sales pro who’s going out on the front lines everyday looking to make contact with people and introduce the value you provide to new people.

In life in general regardless of what you do, you can be a performer, you can be a professional athlete, you can be a performer on stage, you can be someone working in a factory on the assembly line, if you think you are the best person in your role, you will behave consistently with your thoughts. Nancy, has there ever been a time when you wound up having a serious setback and the next thing you knew, you were on top of the world. You went from the lowest of lows to the highest of highs. Has that ever happen to you?

Oh, sure. It happens every week.If you don’t mind sharing with our audience, tell us a story about when that’s happened to you. Tell us first about one of the lows and then tell us about how you came back and one of the highs. Give us the story.

Sure. I have many stories of those instances, but I guess one that happened quite often was last year I was a full-time student and I had a full-time job and an internship. For me it was just the struggle of balancing everything. Anytime something bad happened even if it was the smallest thing, my confidence would completely plummet because I would just think to myself, “Why am I not Superwoman? Why can’t I do everything and do it perfectly?” I think it’s sometimes you expect so much from yourself that the smallest thing that lets you down, you’re just going to feel like total crap about yourself.

The point that you raised is a good one. When we talk about how to overcome setbacks or how to boost your self-esteem, we choose the view we have of ourselves. You choose to view yourself in any given moment as the person who achieved the highlight of your career or you can choose to view yourself as the person who just got absolutely crushed. I feel that it’s so valuable to share stories of setbacks and how you overcome them that … The reason that it’s valuable to share that is because for 2 reasons. Number 1, it’s just like why we go to the movies. People think we go to the movies to laugh and be entertained or to be thrilled or to engage in a story that keeps us riveted.

The real reason we go to the movies is to experience through the portrayal of other’s lives, to experience the emotions that other people experience and we want to see that other people have setbacks that are worst than ours. We want to see that other people have it worst than ours so we can feel better about ourselves. Now you may say to yourself, “Look, that’s a very cynical negative view of the world,” and that maybe true, but subconsciously we look at people who have setbacks and who overcome them and we say to ourselves, Number 1, “Wow, that was so much worst than what’s going on with me. I’m so glad I’m not there.” We also say, “Jeez, if that guy can overcome what just happened to him, I certainly can overcome this.”

Edwin, when you asked me this question, here’s what I’m going to do. I’m going to give you the gift of sharing with you some … Just some crappy experiences that happened to me this past week so that you can understand that no matter what happens, people overcome much worst. Then I’m going to show you how you can overcome whatever situation you’re going through right now. Look, the bottom line is if you have a problem that writing a check can fix, you don’t really have a problem. I’m going to say it again. If you have a problem that writing a check can fix, you don’t really have a problem. Losing a client is not only not the end of the world, but it can encourage you to take massive action and get going to achieve success.

Real problems, real setbacks are things that require massive intervention beyond the scale of human capabilities. I don’t want to bring everybody down, but health issues for example. That’s a real problem. Losing a problem, that’s not a problem. Let me tell you a little bit about what my week was like and you’ll see I think how … I’ll highlight for you how you can use the positive self-esteem that you have to overcome just about anything. My week started off on Monday. There was a thing that’s been on my calendar forever. This Monday one of my clients, somebody who’s been a client of mine for probably … I guess if I had to look, it was 8 or 9 months. Someone who’s been a client for 8 or 9 months had asked me to circle Monday, this past Monday.

He was going to be in Florida. He wanted me to meet him for breakfast. He’s from the West Coast and we speak every week. He’s a weekly consulting client. I work with him on different aspects of his business. He’s an entrepreneur. I work with him on different aspects of his business focusing on growing and improving his business. The work we’ve done together has produced significant results for him. I won’t characterize them as great. If it were my business, I would say the results are great. I would say they were fantastic, but people look at things differently. The results, the value that I’ve provided to him was significant and he’d be the first person to admit this. Sunday night comes, he texts me, sends me the address of where I’m to meet him.

I was led to believe the address was right around the corner from me. It turns out it was about an hour away. He was at a Buddhist Retreat Center which is in the middle of the Florida Everglades. Now this studio where I’m recording this, my home and my studio is right off the back of my home. My home and my studio is on the border of the Everglades. It was natural for me to think this would be close by. Nevertheless, I committed to going, so I decided to go. I drive an hour into the middle of the Everglades to meet this gentlemen. I come to the Buddhist Retreat Center. I park. We meet. We’re sitting having breakfast and talking. He’s talking about all the good things that are going on in his life and in his business.

He thanks me profusely and then he drops the hammer on me. He says to me that he’s got some things in his business that he needs to address and he’s bringing in a consultant, a different consultant, to address them. He gives me these list of things that he and I have never discussed and we speak once a week by the way. He and I have never discussed. He’s never raised them. I would have never thought to ask about them because I didn’t know that these things we’re going on. He says to me, “I’m using your idea,” the idea that I gave him, “to kick this whole thing off.” I look at him and I’m astonished. He says, “We’re going to have to discontinue our work so I can pay for this other consultant.” I said to him, “Why would you think to bring in another consultant to address the issues that you know I can handle?

I gave you the idea that kicked this off. Why would think to bring in another consultant?” He said to me, “I was reading this book and the author of this book … What she said really resonated with me. Her fees are much more than yours,” which also made me feel great. He’s bringing in somebody who cost a lot more than me. “I feel like she’s going to be able to fix what’s wrong with me.” Set aside how I responded to this gentlemen in this instance, bottom line is I drove the hour back from the Buddhist Retreat Center to my office knowing that this client, after our termination period, that this client was going to go away, that I’m not going to have this client anymore. That was on Monday. Yesterday which was Tuesday … We’re recording this on a Wednesday.

Yesterday which is Tuesday, I’m conducting a meeting that I do that I hold for lawyers once a month. It’s a group I run for lawyers in South Florida once a month. It’s one of the only ways I work with lawyers anymore, but it’s a powerful group of successful attorneys. We’re going around the room talking about things that are working. One of my clients makes a presentation in the meeting talking about how she’s raised her fees as a result of some of the things that I’ve taught her and her business has improved immeasurably. Then she goes on to say that she’s working with another consultant on a specific issue and that other consultant has produced fantastic results for her and she tells people what she’s paying the other consultant.

She’s paying the other consultant … You guessed it. More than she’s paying me. That’s Tuesday. Okay? Monday. Tuesday. Two hits which would have thrust most people into the valley of depression. They would have said to themselves, “What the hell am I doing wrong? I cannot believe my clients are paying other people more than they’re paying me. I am obviously not demonstrating my value. This is ridiculous.” All right. Last night, Tuesday night, those of you who listen regularly know that my family, we are baseball fanatics. My soon to be 8 year old son plays on 2 baseball teams. He’s playing on 2 baseball teams this fall. Year round he plays baseball. He plays baseball 6 days a week. He’s a baseball nut.

We watch baseball all the time. Even on winter we watch games that were played last year. We’re fanatics for baseball. Last night my son’s baseball team plays. They’re undefeated this season. They only lost 1 game in the summer season. It’s the fall season. They’re undefeated so far. They are 7-0 and 1. They actually have a tie. They ran out of time in 1 game and they ended up tying the other team. They’re playing a team that’s 5 and 1. The teams meet and they’re down going into the last inning. They’re the visiting team. Top of the sixth inning they’re down by 5 runs. They played probably one of their worst games of the year. Defensive they’re all over the place. They’re down by 5 runs.

This team hits like crazy and they’re just not hitting really well in this game. At the 8 and under level in the league that they play in, the sixth inning is what they call an open inning. There’s usually a runs limit per inning, but in the sixth inning you can score as many runs as possible. In the sixth inning, my son’s team gets up and something unbelievable happens. Their bats woke up and they scored 18 runs in the sixth inning. 18 runs in the sixth inning. They put the team away and they won the game. Their character was such they were able to come back in spite of being down the entire game. These 3 stories all strung together. We talk about things that could be setbacks. I came home from that game last night.

We’re all fired up. We’re excited. Everybody goes to bed. We’re all fired up. We’re excited. Everybody goes to bed. It’s 11:00. I put on the television in the background. I pour myself a glass of wine and I’m just reviewing what’s going on in my business to get ready for today and I noticed something unusual. I looked at the proposals that I’ve written actually just this week alone based on the activity that I’ve conducted over the last couple of months. You know what? I have more proposals outstanding. I’m due to get more answers on proposals by the end of this week than I’ve ever had in my history. We’re recording this show … Right now it is the end of October. It’s October 26, Wednesday, October 26 when we’re recording this. My proposals for 2017 …

If all of the proposals I have outstanding this week alone come through, my 2017 revenue will be close to double the revenue I did in 2016. Just the proposals that I’ve written and I have outstanding this week alone. I finished my glass of wine last night. I go up to get into bed and my wife is sitting there watching the news. I mute the TV for a second and I say, “You know what? You and I spent so much time in the last couple of days talking about ridiculously bad things that have happened. I just looked at what’s going on in the business,” in our business because it is our business and I showed her the numbers. She said, “Oh, my goodness.” She said, “This could be your best week ever.” I said, “You’re 100% right.”

Edwin and everybody else who’s listening, you’re perspective is so important. Human nature leads us to focus on the things that are happening in our lives that are negative. The reason we do that is simply because of how we’re wired. You need to rewire your brain and focus on the things that are going on that are positive. Focus on the things that are going well. You can choose who you want to be in your mind. The beauty of the human mind is it cannot tell the difference between reality and your perception. You can choose to believe that you are the person who has achieved the greatest result you’ve ever achieved in your business. When I was the managing shareholder of The Gallup Organization, I closed a deal which was the biggest deal in the history of the firm at the time.

It was a $20 million consulting deal. I choose to believe that I’m the guy that closed the $20 million deal. I’m not the guy that drove out into the middle of a swamp and got fired by a client at a Buddhist Monastery. That’s not me. That happened and it’s hysterical. It’s absolutely hysterical that it happened and I will use that story forever because I think it’s a terrific story. I’m not that guy. That’s one incident that happened to me. I’m the $20 million guy. That’s what I choose to believe. When I look back on Friday at this week, I’m going to look back and I’m going to look at the proposals that I have outstanding. Even if only 1 or 2 of them come through, it was a fantastic week. When Nick, my son, looks at the game he played last night, he doesn’t look at the 5 innings his team was getting crushed.

He looks at the one inning when they scored all those runs. That’s what he looks at. That’s who he chooses to believe he is. Here’s some things you can do. Here’s some things you can do to boost your self-esteem because what you put out to the universe and this is going to sound all foo foo, hokey, but it’s true. What you choose to put out to the universe comes back to you. People perceive you the way you present yourself to the world. This is not some mystical holistic hocus pocus. I’m not making fun of you holistic mystical people. Believe anything you want to believe. This is fact. If you approach people with confidence, if you approach people like you’re the $20 million person, they will believe you are the $20 million person.

If you approach people like you’re the sad sack loser who can’t get a deal done, who got fired in a Buddhist Monastery, who’s client stood up in front of everyone else and told everyone else that she was paying a consultant more than she’s paying you, if you choose to believe you’re that person, it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. You will be that loser. Choose to believe the good things and you will put out to the world that you are that best person in your industry and people accept you at your own appraisal. Here’s what I want you to do to shift your mindset. I want you to do these 5 things. These 5 things. Number 1, list all the positives that have happened to you during the course of the day. List all the positives that have happened to you during the course of the day and review them at the end of the day before you go to sleep.

If you can’t think of all the positives, list 2 or 3 and focus on those positives. Let those be the last thing you think of before you put your head on the pillow at night because I want that to be the last memory you have before you go to sleep. When you wake up in the morning, take that same list which should be on our nightstand next to your bed and look at that list first thing in the morning. These are the great things that happened to me yesterday. Then when the negative comes in, just push it out. Say, “I don’t want to think about that. I want to think about these positive things.” Number 2, at dinnertime, eliminate all the negative talk. Only talk about good things that happened during the day at dinner. In our house we go around the table and we talk about the best thing that happened to you today.

We talk about the best thing that happened. We start off by talking about the funniest thing that happened. What’s the funniest thing that happened to you today? It could be something that happened to you personally. It could be something that you saw, something that you observed. Then we talk about the best thing that happened to you today. We do that because we want to focus on the positives. Then, because I have 2 little kids, my wife and I pick out a couple of goods things we caught the kids doing during the course of the day and we talk about a couple of the good things we caught the kids doing to reinforce the positive behavior. Dinnertime conversation is so important.

If you spend your dinnertime conversation talking about, “I can’t believe that my health care premiums are going to double. Can you believe what this woman said about me in this meeting? Oh, my God,” it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. If you focus on the negative, it’s going to drag you down. Don’t do that. Spend your dinnertime conversation focusing on the positive. If you eat dinner by yourself, you should be spending the time with your self-talk … Okay. This is so important. Your self-talk in your mind, your mental movie theater, should be playing the highlight reel of the day, not the lowlights. It shouldn’t be playing the reel of times when you tripped and you spilled coffee all over that brand new blouse you bought. That’s not going to be helpful.

You should be reviewing in your mind the mental highlight reel from the day. You’ll have a smile on your face at the end of dinner and when you walk around, people will see you smiling and people are attracted to people who are smiling. They’re attracted to happy people. The third thing I want you to do is I want you to make a conscious effort to get testimonials. Nancy and I in our episode last week talked about how to get testimonials. The episode last week is called The Ask. The Ask. You can look for it at DaveLorenzo.com under podcasts. You’ll find The Ask there or you can just go to DaveLorenzo.com and type in T-H-E-A-S-K and you’ll find that episode. It’s a great episode where we talked about how you get testimonials. Get positive testimonials. Get at least 1 or 2 a week.

Your testimonials are a huge part of your marketing, a huge part of your sales process, but more importantly, review those testimonials to boost your own self-esteem. Those testimonials show the value you provide. Read them. Believe them. People wouldn’t have written them, they wouldn’t have said those words if they didn’t think they were true. You are that person. You are the person who provided that value in order to earn that testimonial. When you’re down in the dumps, read your testimonials. Number 4, I want you to diagnose your best achievements. So often when we screw up, we spend every minute of every hour of the day after going through step-by-step what happened. Think about the last time you had a conflict or a fight with someone particularly in your personal life.

You go back and you think to yourself, “Man, I said this. I said this. I said this. He said this. He said this. He said this. Oh, my goodness. I wish I could go back and here’s what I would do differently.” I don’t want you to do that anymore. That’s gone. That’s over with. Forget about that. What I want you to do is I want you to take the best possible things that have happened to you and I want you to spend your time diagnosing that. That great deal that you signed, that great deal that you just closed, I want you to think about how that relationship got started. I want you to think about the hard work and persistence you put into to win those people over. I want you to think about that one point when everything could have gone the other way and you pulled it back from the brink.

You’re that person. I want you to diagnose your best deals. I want you to go through and obsess over step-by-step what you did and think about how you can do it again. You can do it on command. You can do it anytime you want to. You’re that person. That’s the guy, that’s the woman you are. I want you to diagnose those great deals and forget about the ones that fall by the wayside. Who cares about them? Over and done with. Finally, the fifth point is I want you to remember this specific phrase, “Today’s activity leads to tomorrow’s result. Today’s activity leads to tomorrow’s result.” If you want to influence tomorrow, get busy doing the right things today. After you’ve diagnosed those fantastic deals that you’ve closed, you’ve broken them down and you saw it step-by-step.

 

Go out and do those same things today, right now. Diagnose how you started the relationship that led to the million dollar deal you closed and then go out right now today and do that activity with 5 or 6 or a dozen different people who could become that next million dollar client. Focus on the steps you’re taking today to make tomorrow the day you close the biggest deal ever. You will relate the fact that you’re taking positive steps today to million dollar deals tomorrow and you will never ever get down in the dumps again. You will never feel bad about what happens to you because you know you’re doing the right things. Our self-esteem is one of the most critical aspects of our success. If you’re an entrepreneur, your self-esteem is more important than any financial investment.

Your self-esteem is more important than any skills or knowledge or talent. If you feel good about yourself, you’ll be able to take whatever action is necessary to achieve the results that you want. When things happen, you’ll be resilient. You’ll be able to bounce back from adversity and you’ll be able to come even stronger than you were before. This is probably the most important concept that you can master as an entrepreneur, as a business leader, as a sales professional. The sooner you understand and internalize this concept, the more you’ll feel like you’re of the world and the better you will perform in your business and in your life.

My friends, it is a pleasure to share this with you and I want your feedback on how you’ve been able to leverage these concepts to achieve success. The best way to reach out to me is to connect with me on social media. We’ve got so much stuff going on on social media. There are articles that are going up every day on my Facebook page and you can find that Facebook page @TheDaveLorenzo. I put up one minute videos all the time on concepts just like this on Instagram. Again that’s @TheDaveLorenzo on Instagram. I put up a whole bunch of stuff on Twitter which is related not only to business strategies, sales, marketing, productivity improvement, but also my thoughts on the election, politics, baseball, football, sports, ridiculous things that happen to me all the time.

I put that stuff on Twitter. You can find my Twitter handle. You can find me on Twitter @TheDaveLorenzo on Twitter. Of course, the fantastic center, the hub of information for sales and beyond is my website. That’s DaveLorenzo.com. It’s my name with dot com after it, DaveLorenzo.com. On there we’ve got dozens and dozens of videos, hundreds of articles, all of these podcasts. If you want to go back and listen, they’re all there for you. DaveLorenzo.com. As always I thank Nancy Pop, our fantastic producer for joining me on the show today. I thank you for listening. Until next time.

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Self-esteem is the most important aspect of sales. You are who you think you are! If you want to grow your book of business you must think of yourself as the person you want to be. For example: You have two widely different sales years. Self-esteem is the most important aspect of sales. You are who you think you are!<br /> <br /> If you want to grow your book of business you must think of yourself as the person you want to be.<br /> <br /> For example:<br /> <br /> You have two widely different sales years. In year one you close $1 million in new business and take home $200,000 in compensation.  In year 2 you close $2 million in new business and take home $400,000.<br /> <br /> Are you the $1 million producer or the $2 million producer?<br /> <br /> Or are you a $10 million producer who is just getting warmed up?<br /> <br /> You perception of yourself will determine how much you produce next year.<br /> <br /> In this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we focus on how you can improve your self-esteem and use it to grow your business.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript of this episode:<br /> <br /> Hey, everyone. Welcome to another edition of The 60 Second Sales Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo and with me I have my partner in distributing fantastic information. I know you think I was going to say my partner in crime, but no crime will be committed here today. My partner in distributing fantastic information, Nancy Pop. Hi, Nancy. How are you?<br /> <br /> Hi, Dave. I'm doing good. How about you?<br /> <br /> I'm doing great, thanks. Today we're going to kick off with a great question and it's something that is so important. I can't even begin to tell you how important this is. Nancy, read the question we got from my friend, Edwin, in Titusville and then we'll talk a little bit about the concept that Edwin raises today.<br /> <br /> Today's question is from Edwin Allen from Titusville, Florida. He says, "Dave, I lost my best client a couple of weeks ago and I'm really down. How do I get my confidence back?"<br /> <br /> This is probably the most important thing ... The most important factor in business is your self-esteem. Think about that for a minute. When we think about business, we think about funding. We think about finances and how to have the money we need to get things done, but really that's not the most important factor in business. The most important factor in business is the self-esteem of the leader. It's the self-esteem of the sales pro who's going out on the front lines everyday looking to make contact with people and introduce the value you provide to new people.<br /> <br /> In life in general regardless of what you do, you can be a performer, you can be a professional athlete, you can be a performer on stage, you can be someone working in a factory on the assembly line, if you think you are the best person in your role, you will behave consistently with your thoughts. Nancy, has there ever been a time when you wound up having a serious setback and the next thing you knew, you were on top of the world. You went from the lowest of lows to the highest of highs. Has that ever happen to you?<br /> <br /> Oh, sure. It happens every week.If you don't mind sharing with our audience, tell us a story about when that's happened to you. Tell us first about one of the lows and then tell us about how you came back and one of the highs. Give us the story.<br /> <br /> Sure. I have many stories of those instances, but I guess one that happened quite often was last year I was a full-time student and I had a full-time job and an internship. For me it was just the struggle of balancing everything. Anytime something bad happened even if it was the smallest thing, my confidence would completely plummet because I would just think to myself, "Why am I not Superwoman? Why can't I do everything and do it perfectly?" I think it's sometimes you expect so much from yourself that the smallest thing that lets you down, you're just going to feel like total crap about yourself.<br /> <br /> The point that you raised is a good one. When we talk about how to overcome setbacks or how to boost your self-esteem, we choose the view we have of ourselves. Dave Lorenzo clean 29:01
The Ask https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/24/the-ask/ Mon, 24 Oct 2016 16:00:23 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=829 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/24/the-ask/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/24/the-ask/feed/ 0 The Ask That is the title of this week's episode of the 60 Second Sales Show. On this show, we discuss the four things you should ask for in a meeting. They are: Ask for business - sell something Ask for a referral Ask for a testimonial Ask to keep in touch We go into detail about each of these and share some ideas on how you can ask for at least one of these things in each meeting. Here is the transcript of this episode: Hi there workplace warriors, I'm Dave Lorenzo. You've only got 60 seconds to make a first impression and I've got half that time to convince you to come with me to the place to be. It's the place you know that will make your wallet grow. It is the 60 Second Sales Show. Hello everyone. Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I'm your host Dave Lorenzo and on the other side of the glass we have Nancy Pop. I always get a chuckle out of that Nancy, when I say on the other side of the glass. It's like you're in the engineering booth here when actually you're 1200 miles away from me. Welcome Nancy Pop, our producer. How are you today? I'm doing great Dave, how are you? I am fantastic. Today one of the things we're going to do is we're going to talk about ... The title of this episode is The Ask. One of the things we're going to talk about is what you should ask for in every interaction. Any time you're sitting down with someone, you should be asking for at least one of 4 things. That's what we're going to talk about today. That's your tease for today's episode. Before we get into today's episode Nancy, I want to tell you a little bit about what I did this week that I think was really exciting. I want to tell you and our listeners a little bit about how I spent the last couple of days and explore, really the value that I got out of it and demonstrate to our listeners how they can benefit. The last couple of days, on Monday ... We're recording this on a Thursday, just so you know. For context, we release it on a Monday. It doesn't really matter because you listen to it whenever you feel like listening to it but I want to give you some context so that you can have an idea of what I'm talking about. On Monday, I took 3 days off of my schedule which is a significant amount of money for me because either I'm making money selling something to someone or I'm making money delivering a service or I'm making money coaching an executive, so to take 3 days off of my schedule is a huge deal. I took 3 days off of my schedule this week and on Monday morning, super early in the morning, I flew up to Rhode Island and I invested a couple of days spending time with a gentleman who is a mentor to me. He is the foremost authority on consulting. His name is Dr. Alan Weiss. For those of you who are not familiar with Alan Weiss, maybe you're not in the consulting field, he's written over 60 books, six zero, 60 books on consulting. He is my mentor. He's a mentor to a lot of people in consulting. He helps people who do what I do, and he helps us focus our offerings, get our business in order. Really, he serves as a sounding board for people. Exactly what I do for you, whether you're an entrepreneur, a sales professional, or I work with a large number of people in professional services like lawyers, accountants, real estate brokers, that sort of thing. I do what Alan does for consultants, I do that for other people. In order for my life to be congruent, in order for everything to be in line, I have to do what I recommend my clients do. I took 2 days. I flew up to Rhode Island, spent 2 days with Alan and laid out my business plan, say for the next 5 years. I was originally thinking I was going to do it for the next year. We sat down, we said no, let's do it for the next 5 years. I laid out my business plan for the next 5 years with him and we went through everything from strategy to specific focus tactics to mindset and what I found is that every time I do this, 3 things happen. The Ask

That is the title of this week’s episode of the 60 Second Sales Show.

On this show, we discuss the four things you should ask for in a meeting. They are:

  1. Ask for business – sell something
  2. Ask for a referral
  3. Ask for a testimonial
  4. Ask to keep in touch

We go into detail about each of these and share some ideas on how you can ask for at least one of these things in each meeting.

Here is the transcript of this episode:

Hi there workplace warriors, I’m Dave Lorenzo. You’ve only got 60 seconds to make a first impression and I’ve got half that time to convince you to come with me to the place to be. It’s the place you know that will make your wallet grow. It is the 60 Second Sales Show. Hello everyone. Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I’m your host Dave Lorenzo and on the other side of the glass we have Nancy Pop. I always get a chuckle out of that Nancy, when I say on the other side of the glass. It’s like you’re in the engineering booth here when actually you’re 1200 miles away from me. Welcome Nancy Pop, our producer. How are you today?

I’m doing great Dave, how are you?

I am fantastic. Today one of the things we’re going to do is we’re going to talk about … The title of this episode is The Ask. One of the things we’re going to talk about is what you should ask for in every interaction. Any time you’re sitting down with someone, you should be asking for at least one of 4 things. That’s what we’re going to talk about today. That’s your tease for today’s episode. Before we get into today’s episode Nancy, I want to tell you a little bit about what I did this week that I think was really exciting. I want to tell you and our listeners a little bit about how I spent the last couple of days and explore, really the value that I got out of it and demonstrate to our listeners how they can benefit.

The last couple of days, on Monday … We’re recording this on a Thursday, just so you know. For context, we release it on a Monday. It doesn’t really matter because you listen to it whenever you feel like listening to it but I want to give you some context so that you can have an idea of what I’m talking about. On Monday, I took 3 days off of my schedule which is a significant amount of money for me because either I’m making money selling something to someone or I’m making money delivering a service or I’m making money coaching an executive, so to take 3 days off of my schedule is a huge deal.

I took 3 days off of my schedule this week and on Monday morning, super early in the morning, I flew up to Rhode Island and I invested a couple of days spending time with a gentleman who is a mentor to me. He is the foremost authority on consulting. His name is Dr. Alan Weiss. For those of you who are not familiar with Alan Weiss, maybe you’re not in the consulting field, he’s written over 60 books, six zero, 60 books on consulting. He is my mentor. He’s a mentor to a lot of people in consulting. He helps people who do what I do, and he helps us focus our offerings, get our business in order. Really, he serves as a sounding board for people.

Exactly what I do for you, whether you’re an entrepreneur, a sales professional, or I work with a large number of people in professional services like lawyers, accountants, real estate brokers, that sort of thing. I do what Alan does for consultants, I do that for other people. In order for my life to be congruent, in order for everything to be in line, I have to do what I recommend my clients do. I took 2 days. I flew up to Rhode Island, spent 2 days with Alan and laid out my business plan, say for the next 5 years. I was originally thinking I was going to do it for the next year. We sat down, we said no, let’s do it for the next 5 years.

I laid out my business plan for the next 5 years with him and we went through everything from strategy to specific focus tactics to mindset and what I found is that every time I do this, 3 things happen. Every time I spend time with someone and bounce ideas off of someone, 3 things happen. The first thing that happens is my ideas come into sharper focus. There are days when I’ll run in the gym and I’ll get a great idea for a seminar, or I’ll get a great idea for developing a new product, or I’ll get a great idea that I want to share with one of my clients. I write that down and I come home. If it’s something to share with a client, I immediately call the client and share it with them, but if it’s a seminar or a product, sometimes I’ll write it down and I’ll put it on the back burner. Nancy, have you ever done that? You come up with an idea and you put it on the back burner?

Of course. Who hasn’t?

After a month or two, you wind up with a list of 10 or 15 ideas and no action is ever taken on them. When you do something like this, take a couple days off your schedule and meet with a mentor and really talk about your business at a high level, all of those ideas start to take shape. If you have 15, 2 or 3 of them are probably really, really good. That’s the first real value that comes from that. The second real value that comes from taking this time and thinking about your business in a different way, the second thing that comes from that is you create an action list for all the things you need to do to move your business to the next level. You’re out of your business, the phone’s not ringing, your clients are not pounding on your door, your employees aren’t pestering you every 5 minutes so you have this time to really put some action steps together.

You can align the action steps so that you can build momentum. You can select your quick wins, the things that you can do today, so that you can feel good about the momentum. Then you align the things you’re going to do over the next week, over the next month, over the next year so that you’re now a rock rolling down a hill. You have all these action steps. You know clearly. You have a clear path that you set and you know what you’re going to do. The third thing that comes from this time when you unplug and you spend time with someone who really knows your business, who’s intimately familiar with your business is they can help you really focus on your mindset.

They can help you identify when you’re feeling guilty about things you shouldn’t, when you are not focused and giving 100% to the things you say you want, and when you’re making judgments based on things that are not real. When you’re making judgment based on things that are not in actual evidence. These two days, which if I looked at what I invested in these two days taking them off my schedule and then the one day for travel up to Rhode Island and back from Miami so really it’s 3 days as a whole. If I look at this and I said to myself, “Wow, that’s a huge amount of time and money I’m investing in this,” I will make back probably tenfold, fifteenfold, 20 times the amount that I invested just based on what I’ve come away with. The happy by-product of that is that I’m all fired up. I’m excited, I’m in love with my business again. I was in love with it when I went up there but I’m all excited.

I’m fired up about the value I can deliver to you and the value I can deliver to my clients all the time. That’s what I worked on this week, and that’s what’s gotten me really excited. If you’re listening to me right now, the point for you in all of this is take time at least once a year, preferably more often that that. Twice a year, once a quarter, to strategically look at your business. If you have someone like I do, if you’re fortunate enough like I have Alan, if you’re fortunate enough to have someone who is a mentor to you, who can take that time with you and really focus on the business, who intimately knows your business and can focus with you, it’s that much more valuable because that person will keep you on track.

Incredibly valuable couple of days. I was excited to do it and I’m excited to come back now and get back into things with you here today. That’s what I’ve done the past couple of days. I am adjusting this mic so it doesn’t keep hitting me in the head. We don’t have that annoying noise. Let’s talk about the ask. Nancy, we have a question that I think is a really good one. Let’s kick off the episode today answering the question and then we can get into the ask. You have Amy’s question there. Why don’t you go ahead and give us Amy’s question?

Yes. We have a fantastic question from Amy Brennan in Tacoma, Washington. She says, “Dave, I’m embarrassed to ask for testimonials. What is the best way to get people to give you a testimonial?”

Thank you Amy for that question. Thanks Nancy for reading it. Here’s what Amy is talking about. I have a rule, and the rule is this. Whenever you go to a meeting, whether it’s a meeting with a client, meeting with a friend, a meeting with someone who’s a business associate, you have to ask for one of 4 things. Amy brings up the testimonial, and that’s one of the 4 things you have to ask for. You can ask for a testimonial but you can also ask for business, which is called selling. You can ask for business. You can ask for a referral or you could ask for permission to keep in touch. Again, there’s 4 things. You have to ask for one of the 4 things every time you meet with someone.

Every time you meet with a client, every time you meet with a prospect, every time you meet with a referral source, you have to ask for one of these 4 things. That’s my rule. Let’s go through how you can ask for each of these 4 things. Business. We spend a lot of time talking about how you can ask for business. Let’s address Amy’s question as it relates to the testimonial, first and foremost. You’re meeting with a client. You’re sitting down with them. You’re maybe having a lunch or a cup of coffee or whatever, and your meeting is about 3/4 of the way over. It’s almost done. You say to the client … Nancy I’m going to use you as a client, Nancy, let me just check in with you. How are things going? Are you happy with the work we’re doing together? Pretend you’re happy, Nancy.

I’m very happy, Dave. Very happy, indeed.

Thank you. That’s great to hear, Nancy. If I asked you for one thing, the one thing that you’re most proud of in our work together, what would that one thing be?

I’ve learned so much and I’ve really been able to put it into practice and my sales have doubled in the past 3 months.

Wow! Doubled, that’s fantastic. Nancy, I appreciate you saying that so much. It makes me feel good to hear you say that. Would you mind taking a moment and I can get out my phone and you just give me an example of one of the things that we’ve worked on together that has helped you. Just give me a brief testimonial, a 2-minute testimonial about one of the things we’ve worked on and how it’s helped you and how your sales have doubled over the past couple of months. Could I pull out my phone now? You look perfect. Your dress is beautiful, your makeup is great, your hair is absolutely ravishing. Would you mind if we just do a 2-minute testimonial now? That’s it!

I don’t see why not.

It’s that simple. Not everybody is going to want to be on camera. I could say to Nancy, “Nancy, I really appreciate you saying that. Would you do me a favor? Would you just jot that down in an email and send it to me? I’d love to have a testimonial and use that as a pull quote on my website, and it would be great if I had it in an email. In fact, what I’ll do now is I’m going to send you an email on my phone. You said that your sales have doubled in the last 3 months. It would be great if you gave me an example of one thing we worked on that helped you double those sales. Here. I just sent you an email to remind you. Just reply to that email with the exact quote and then I will send it to you once I clean it up and you can tell me whether you like it or not, and I can use that as a pull quote.” That’s what that’s called, a pull quote, from my website. Nancy would be happy to do that, right?

That’s how easy it is. Simply ask people, “How are things going?” Look, here’s the thing. If Nancy is a client of mine, I need to ask her how things are going all the time. Every time I see her I should ask her how things are going, right? She’s my client. I want to make sure she’s happy. Then once in a while, ask her if you can use that as a testimonial. To Amy’s point, if you’re embarrassed, here’s the best way to get a testimonial from someone who’s not a client. What you should do is you should say to someone who’s not a client who’s a referral source, “Listen. I used your service. Your service is fantastic.” You write a great testimonial for them. Put it on your letterhead and hand it to them.

Nancy’s my chiropractor. “Nancy, thank you so much. I really appreciate that adjustment you gave me last week. It made it possible for me to run a half marathon and I completed it in new personal best time.” I write that up on my letterhead. “You are my first choice. Any time I have a little ache or a pain, I will do business with you until I die.” Boom. Put it on my letterhead, sign it and I hand it to Nancy. Nancy says, “Gee. Thanks so much for that great testimonial.” You say, “Oh, you’re welcome. I know you’d do the same for me.” Write that down. That’s a money sentence right there. That script is money. When they say, “Thank you so much for the testimonial,” “It’s my pleasure, I know you’d do the same for me.” When I hand Nancy the testimonial she says thank you, she says, “Well, I really appreciate it.” You say, “My pleasure. I know you’d do the same for me.” Nancy, what’s your reaction?

Of course.

Absolutely. You want me to do it right now? I’d be happy to do it for you, right? Then you decide whether you want the testimonial now or whether you want it later. When you want to ask for a testimonial, you do your check-in. “Hey, how are things going? How are you enjoying the service? How are you enjoying the product?” Then the response is, “It’s fantastic. I’m going to double my sales.” “Great, would you mind jotting that down?” Here’s how we’ll do it. You jot it down on an email, send it to them. They give you an exact quote. You ask them if you can clean the quote up a bit, get out the uhs and ums, and then you send it back to them. They say, “That’s a perfect quote,” you put it on your website.

That’s how you get a testimonial. Or you can whip out your phone and do a testimonial video right then and there. Amy, that answers your question. That’s how you ask for a testimonial but that’s only one of 4 things that we should do whenever we meet with someone. The second thing is ask for a referral. You heard me give you this methodology before, I’m sure. When we ask for a referral, we have to have somebody in a referral mindset. We have to talk to them about someone they’ve met in the last say, few years or someone they met who’s famous. Nancy, if I said to you, “Tell me about a time when you met a famous person,” would you be able to tell me a story?

I have a couple stories.

Tell me your story about meeting a famous person.

My first ever concert that I went to was when I was 13 years old. I went to a Hilary Duff concert. She touched my hand because she was on stage and I had front row tickets. I didn’t wash my hands for a week after that.

Let’s set aside the hygiene issue for a minute Nancy, because that’s really disgusting.

I was a big fan, Dave. I was a big fan.

That is so gross, I can’t even begin to tell you how disgusted I am that you used the bathroom dozens of times over the course of that week and you didn’t wash your hands. Let’s just set that aside. Forget about that for a minute. That is a great story. The fact that you told me that story now, what it has done is it’s opened the file in your mind where I got you to think of someone that you met in the past. If I said to you, “You know, Nancy, I would love to meet someone who is in the modeling industry. I’d love to meet someone who owns a super successful modeling agency. The reason I want to meet with them is because I have this new program, and the program is designed to help them attract the best models because I know the industry is so competitive. You wouldn’t happen to know anybody who’s in that industry who owns a modeling agency in New York City, would you?”

I do, as a matter of fact. I could certainly introduce you.

See, it’s so easy then, for me to get someone to access the part of their brain where they open the file and they know somebody. They can give me the exact person. You could do this with any … It has to be reasonable. I know Nancy is in modeling and she’s worked in that field forever so it was a no-brainer for me to ask. In fact, I could probably just walk up to her because I know her and say, “Hey, Nancy. How’s it going? Do you know somebody who owns a modeling agency?” She would probably be able to introduce me because she was immersed in that world, but most people when they are thinking about other things draw a blank when you ask them for referrals. They just draw a complete blank, “You know, I have to think about it. I’m not really sure.”

That’s what frustrates folks. That’s why they get embarrassed and they don’t ask for referrals. Getting the person to tell you the story first opens up that mental file. They access that file in their mind, and they can produce a story. The famous person, that gets them thinking about the time when they met the famous person. As you saw with Nancy, they get emotionally engaged. All those good feelings come back to them. They associate the good feeling with the introduction, so it associates good feelings with accessing that information. Then when you ask them, they can very easily give you the ideal person you want to meet. The right referral for you, on the spot.

Now, notice the way I asked Nancy for that referral. I did it in a specific way. I asked for the person specifically, their title, what the industry that they were in. Modeling CEO, the owner of a modeling agency. Their title, and I gave a reason why I wanted to meet them. Those 3 things. Their title, the industry they were in and the reason why I wanted to meet them. Why is that important? She may not know the owner of the modeling agency but she may know a manager of a local office. That would be just as good so I said modeling agency, modeling. I said that industry. The industry is important. The title, the owner is important because I want to start at the top and even if she doesn’t know the owner, she’ll push me down to the right person.

She’ll push me down to the person she knows, and that person may be able to get me to the person that I want to meet. Then the third thing I do is I gave her the reason why. This is what’s missing when everybody asks for referrals. If you don’t give the person the reason why you want to meet their friend or why you want to meet the person they know, if you don’t give them the reason why, they’re never going to introduce you because they’re not going to know what to say. You have to give them the reason why you want to meet them, and you have to make that reason why non-threatening. I want to meet them because I can save them money. I want to meet them because I have someone who will be perfect for them, for the agency who is going to model. I want to meet them because I know that I have something they need.

Here’s what it is, give them very specifics so that when they call the person up they say, “I want you to meet my friend Dave. He knows he can save you money, because he’s saved money for 15 different modeling agencies this way. I’d like to set up a meeting.” You’ve got to give him those 3 things. That’s the second thing you do when you ask. The number one thing, of course, is to ask for business. We talk about that all the time. You’re meeting with your best client. You’re meeting with your absolute best client and they tell you about a problem they have. You know you can solve that problem and you say, “You know what? I understand you’re having problems with your manufacturing of widgets. We have a new process that I think would be perfect for you. I’d like to come over and demonstrate the process. If it works, it’ll only add a small investment to your monthly bill but it’ll save you thousands of dollars. Can I come over and demonstrate this process?”

That’s a way of asking for business. If you’re working with a client now … The example I give to people all the time is, I work with a guy in New York who makes my suits. His name is Chris Cartisano. He’s an excellent clothier and I’d be thrilled to refer him to any of you. Chris, I know you’re listening. I hopefully will generate some business when people listen because you are the best of the best. Chris does something that is phenomenal. Every time he comes over to deliver a suit to me, I put the suit on. When I go to New York he comes. He delivers the suit, I put the suit on. He looks at it and we make sure it fits absolutely perfect. Then because I am a fashionably challenged kind of guy, we talk about what I would pair that suit with.

What kind of tie, what kind of shirt, and then he always gives me a tie or some type of accessory. A pocket square to go with the suit, and then I say to him, “You know what I really need now? I need a shirt.” By giving me the tie, he suggestively sells something else. If I don’t offer to buy the shirt, he says, “Do you want a shirt to go with that?” Or he says, “Now, I just gave you the grey suit,” he says, “We haven’t done a blue suit for you in a while. Would you be interested in getting a blue suit?” He’s never offended if I say no, and frankly if I meet with him 3 or 4 times a year I say no to him probably 2 out of the 3 times. The third time, you know what, he’s right. I do need to update my blue suit or my grey suit, so let’s go and do another suit.

He gets me to buy every time, or almost every time he makes a suggestion to buy almost every time we meet, and it conditions me one out of every 3 times I’m ready to buy from him. When he comes to deliver the suit, I know. It’s not a secret, I know he’s going to ask me to buy something else. We have a relationship. I’ve been working with him for 10 years, more than that. I know that this is going to happen. I have no problem saying no to him. Don’t ever be embarrassed. As long as you’re providing something of value, don’t ever be embarrassed to ask your clients to buy from you every time they meet with you. As long as you’re providing value, don’t be shy about asking for more business.

The final thing we’re going to talk about, the final ask, and remember. You are going to do at least one of these 4. The other 3 were we just said, ask for business. Ask for a referral. Ask for a testimonial. Number 4, ask to keep in touch. I meet you. Nancy introduces me to her friend who owns the modeling agency. We connect, we talk a little bit. There’s obviously nothing that’s going to happen. We’re not going to do any business there. I say to the friend from the modeling agency, “Joe, it was really great meeting you. Would you mind if I kept in touch with you? I publish a weekly newsletter. It comes out on Wednesdays at noon. I’d love to put you on my list. It’s educational information that you can use to grow your business. Would it be all right if I add you to that list?”

You’re going to ask to keep in touch. That’s the easiest thing. The easiest thing. Ask for permission to keep in touch. My friends, nobody ever says no to this. I think one person in the last 15 years has said no and that person was a complete jerk. I wouldn’t want them on my list anyway. “No, I don’t want an email from you! What, are you kidding me?” Obviously the 45 minutes I spent with you was a complete waste of time so I’m glad you told me you didn’t want the email now. That’s the 4th thing, you ask to keep in touch. Every meeting you go to, you’re going to ask for business or you’re going to ask for a referral, or you’re going to ask for a testimonial or you’re going to ask to keep in touch.

Now, if you feel really adventurous, do a couple of these things. Ask for a testimonial and then ask to keep in touch. Or ask for a testimonial and ask for business. Or ask for a testimonial and ask for a referral. Clients expect you to ask them to do things. They expect you to ask to buy more stuff. They expect to be able to do a favor for you. In fact, if we’re friends, if I trust you and you’re my client, I’m happy to go out of my way and introduce you to somebody I know. If I’ve been your client for 5 years, I’m happy, I’m thrilled to give you a testimonial. Asking for these things has to become a habit. If you make this a habit, not only will you make more money but you’ll also have more testimonials, you’ll get more referrals, you’ll have more business. Think about it.

Think about the appointments you have this week. I’m meeting with 6 people this week, either over the phone or in person. If I ask each of those people for one of these things, if I ask all 6 of them for more business, 1 out of the 6 will do more business with me. If I ask all 6 of them for referrals, 3 out of the 6 will provide me with referrals. If I ask all 6 of them for testimonials, 6 out of 6 will do a testimonial for me. I’m providing them with something of value and if I ask all 6 of them if I can keep in touch with them, they’ll all say yes. You have 6 meetings with prospects, you’re going to grow your list by 6 times this week. Well, not by 6 times, but you’ll add 6 more people to your list. You know what I mean. You’ll add 6 more people to your list. The ask is critical. Do not leave any meeting without going for the ask. That’s your takeaway for today. Nancy, any final thoughts before we wrap things up?

Yes. In regard to these testimonials, I have always wondered, I recently graduated school, less than a year ago. I’m in the early stages of my production career and I’ve noticed people that have … This is in regards to LinkedIn but people that have good LinkedIn profiles, they tend to have people they’ve worked with going on and writing comments or writing recommendations under their work experience. I think the answer is yes, but I’m wondering if this same method that you are talking about today would also apply to LinkedIn?

Absolutely. Great question. Yes, go to my LinkedIn profile, thedavelorenzo. T-H-E-D-A-V-E-L-O-R-E-N-Z-O. You’ll see all my testimonials up there and I’ll tell you how I got those. Here’s your 3 step guide. Step number 1, identify the perfect person to give you a testimonial. Step number 2, write a testimonial for them and send it. Step number 3, ask them if they like the testimonial and ask them to do the same thing for you. That’s it. That’s the easiest way to do it. You go and do a testimonial for them, send it, make sure they know you’ve done the testimonial.

Ask them if they like it, and then ask them to do one for you. Now, do not get discouraged when people tell you that they will do it and they don’t do it, because the general population of the world is very poor at follow-through. In fact, I’ll tell you maybe 1 out of every 5 people who says, “Yeah, I’ll give you a testimonial. You’re the greatest.” 1 out of every 5 will do a testimonial for you, but that’s fine. If you ask 50 people you’ll get 10 testimonials. That’s how I got the testimonials on my LinkedIn page. That’s how you can get testimonials for you on your LinkedIn page. Testimonials are great.

Then what I do with those LinkedIn testimonials a lot of times, in fact I haven’t … Nancy, you mentioned that. Here’s what we’ll do. I’ll do a testimonial for you on LinkedIn, you do one for me. I haven’t got a testimonial on LinkedIn in a long time, what I do with those is then I pull those off of LinkedIn, with permission, and I use them on my website too. I’ll even take them and put them in with proposals. I’ll put the full testimonial in with the proposal, and here’s the thing. My friends, if you’re going to use testimonials in proposals or you’re going to send out testimonials to prospective clients, you’ve got to use full names. If you’re putting them on websites especially, a testimonial without a full name and a picture honestly is worthless.

Sounds so sketchy.

You can’t do that. This drives me nuts with lawyers. I go on a lawyer’s website all the time, and in some jurisdictions they can’t even use testimonials but I’ll go on a lawyer’s website and it will say, “Pete Smith saved my home. He helped me fight a foreclosure with my bank and he helped me renegotiate my payment terms. I highly recommend Pete Smith.” Then it says at the bottom, “Homeowner, Joe P.” I mean, come on. That’s not a real testimonial. Look, we live in a video age so if you’re doing testimonials on your website video is the way to go. If you can’t get a video, then a pull quote or a paragraph or two with a picture of the person. Preferably a picture of the person with their arm around you so that it shows, it gives you social proof.

It shows that you actually know the person. Then finally, if you can’t get a picture of them with you then just their head shot and their name. That will provide at least some form of credibility, but you have to use the full name of the person. Yes, Nancy, if you want to add a testimonial to your LinkedIn page, the best thing to do, you go do a testimonial for the other person. You send it to them for their approval and you say, “Listen, I did a testimonial for you. Let me know what you think.” Then after they say, “Oh, that’s so great. You’re the nicest person in the world,” then you just flat out say, “It’s my pleasure to do it. I know you’d do the same for me. How about tomorrow? Why don’t you do it for me?”

That’s it. Here’s an issue that comes up in conjunction with this, Nancy. People often don’t know what to write, so you never give someone the direct words to use. A lot of times people will say, “Well, why don’t you just write it and send it to me and tell me if it’s good?” No, you don’t do that. What you do is, you ask 2 or 3 questions so that they put it in their own words. You say to them, if it was you and I Nancy, I would say, “You know Nancy, remember when you came to me for business advice about that startup?” You’ll say, “Yes, of course.” You say, “Okay, I gave you the advice and what happened?” “Oh, I got funding. I got $50,000 worth of funding.” “Oh, that’s fantastic Nancy. Would you just jot that down exactly the way we just discussed it?”

“Sure, I’d be happy to do it.” Boom, they jot it down in their own words and you’re done. Never put words in someone’s mouth. It’ll come back to bite you. Ask them a couple of questions. Lead them down the path you want them to go, if necessary. You can do that in writing, you can do that verbally, orally, but better to ask them questions and have them respond than to put words in their mouth. Then you write it up nice and neat, take out the uhs and ums, take out any superfluous words if you want and then send it back to them and say, “I characterized what you said. What do you think?” They say, “Great,” and you’re done. That’s how you do it. Does that get it for you?

Sounds amazing, yeah. I’m definitely going to do that today.

All right. Thank you folks, it was great chatting with you this week. We’ll see you right back here next week. That will do it for this week’s episode of the 60 Second Sales Show. Reach out to me with your questions, comments and feedback on Facebook at thedavelorenzo, Twitter @thedavelorenzo, Instagram @thedavelorenzo. Walking down the street just yell at me, “Hey! That’s the Dave Lorenzo!” Thank you very much for listening. I hope you make a great living and live a great life. Until next time, bye bye.

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The Ask That is the title of this week's episode of the 60 Second Sales Show. On this show, we discuss the four things you should ask for in a meeting. They are: Ask for business - sell something Ask for a referral Ask for a testimonial The Ask<br /> <br /> That is the title of this week's episode of the 60 Second Sales Show.<br /> <br /> On this show, we discuss the four things you should ask for in a meeting. They are:<br /> <br /> Ask for business - sell something<br /> Ask for a referral<br /> Ask for a testimonial<br /> Ask to keep in touch<br /> <br /> We go into detail about each of these and share some ideas on how you can ask for at least one of these things in each meeting.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript of this episode:<br /> <br /> Hi there workplace warriors, I'm Dave Lorenzo. You've only got 60 seconds to make a first impression and I've got half that time to convince you to come with me to the place to be. It's the place you know that will make your wallet grow. It is the 60 Second Sales Show. Hello everyone. Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sales Show. I'm your host Dave Lorenzo and on the other side of the glass we have Nancy Pop. I always get a chuckle out of that Nancy, when I say on the other side of the glass. It's like you're in the engineering booth here when actually you're 1200 miles away from me. Welcome Nancy Pop, our producer. How are you today?<br /> <br /> I'm doing great Dave, how are you?<br /> <br /> I am fantastic. Today one of the things we're going to do is we're going to talk about ... The title of this episode is The Ask. One of the things we're going to talk about is what you should ask for in every interaction. Any time you're sitting down with someone, you should be asking for at least one of 4 things. That's what we're going to talk about today. That's your tease for today's episode. Before we get into today's episode Nancy, I want to tell you a little bit about what I did this week that I think was really exciting. I want to tell you and our listeners a little bit about how I spent the last couple of days and explore, really the value that I got out of it and demonstrate to our listeners how they can benefit.<br /> <br /> The last couple of days, on Monday ... We're recording this on a Thursday, just so you know. For context, we release it on a Monday. It doesn't really matter because you listen to it whenever you feel like listening to it but I want to give you some context so that you can have an idea of what I'm talking about. On Monday, I took 3 days off of my schedule which is a significant amount of money for me because either I'm making money selling something to someone or I'm making money delivering a service or I'm making money coaching an executive, so to take 3 days off of my schedule is a huge deal.<br /> <br /> I took 3 days off of my schedule this week and on Monday morning, super early in the morning, I flew up to Rhode Island and I invested a couple of days spending time with a gentleman who is a mentor to me. He is the foremost authority on consulting. His name is Dr. Alan Weiss. For those of you who are not familiar with Alan Weiss, maybe you're not in the consulting field, he's written over 60 books, six zero, 60 books on consulting. He is my mentor. He's a mentor to a lot of people in consulting. He helps people who do what I do, and he helps us focus our offerings, get our business in order. Really, he serves as a sounding board for people.<br /> <br /> Exactly what I do for you, whether you're an entrepreneur, a sales professional, or I work with a large number of people in professional services like lawyers, accountants, real estate brokers, that sort of thing. I do what Alan does for consultants, I do that for other people. In order for my life to be congruent, in order for everything to be in line, I have to do what I recommend my clients do. I took 2 days. I flew up to Rhode Island, spent 2 days with Alan and laid out my business plan, say for the next 5 years. I was originally thinking I was going to do it for the next year. We sat down, we said no, let's do it for the next 5 years.<br /> <br /> I laid out my business plan for the next 5 years with him and we wen... Dave Lorenzo clean 32:12
How To Use Social Media To Boost Sales https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/17/podcast-1014/ Mon, 17 Oct 2016 16:00:09 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=798 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/17/podcast-1014/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/17/podcast-1014/feed/ 0 How to Use Social Media to Boost Sales In this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we discuss how social media can help you grow sales quickly. There are three aspects to sales growth with Social Media: Visibility Credibility Differentiation We look at each of these in this week's who and go into detail on how you can use social media to leverage them. Here is the transcript of this episode: Hi everybody. Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sale Show. I am your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today, I thought we'd start off with a great question from one of our listeners. The question we're going to get today is it's something that comes up all the the time. I'll explain why in a moment. Before we do that. I want to make sure that I introduce you to our fantastic, talented producer, Nancy Pop. Hi Nancy, how are you today? Nancy: Hi Dave, I'm good. How are you doing? Dave:   I'm fantastic, thank you. Nancy, why don't read the question? Actually, you and I discussed the question before we came on the air. This is a question that I got from Jackie on Twitter. It's a question about social media. Why don't you go ahead and read us the question then we can have a conversation about it and talk a little bit more about how to leverage exactly what Jackie is talking about? Nancy: Yes. I think Jackie had a really great question. A lot of people today will really benefit from hearing what you have to say. Her question is, how do I make best use of social media for selling my product? I have hundreds of people following me and connected to me on Facebook and Twitter, Instagram but I can never get them to buy anything. Dave:   Right. You mentioned, we started out the conversation about this and I said, "No, no, no, let's save it for the show because this could be great information that we could share with our viewers, better use would be sharing it with our viewers or our listeners. Go ahead and tell me what we were, start off with what we were talking about before we started the show today. You were saying? Nancy: Yes. What I was saying was, I have a lot of friends or a lot of people that I've worked with in the past. They're all trying to develop their lifestyle brand whether it's through Instagram, or Twitter, or their Facebook page has thousands of followers. They just don't, maybe they're not good salesman or maybe they just don't know how to utilize social media to get the most out of it but they're having such a hard time redirecting people to their website or redirecting people to their sales or to their services whatever it is they're trying to do. Maybe it's a problem with the content they're putting up, maybe it's a problem with just, I don't know. They're just having problems doing it. It's such a big problem for them. Dave:   Yeah. I understand completely what you're talking about. This is something that, just like Jackie said like you're saying now I hear all the time. People go out and they connect with hundreds, dozens, thousand, tens of thousands of people on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, whatever the social media platform du jour is or the social media platforms that's the most desirable platform for your target audience. You feel like you're putting out great information but there's no response in terms of converting people from folks who are just out there doing what appears to be lurking into converting them into sales. What do you do? This question baffled me for, I want to say probably, I have to say the better part of 10 years. I'll tell you, I'll give you my history on Twitter for example. I was one of the early adopters of Twitter. I loved Twitter. I'll give you a couple of examples of great relationships that I've developed through using Twitter. My original Twitter handle was DLorenzo, DLORENZO. After a few years, I started using Twitter in 2006-2007, and really got into it in 2008. I had built my followers up to about, I guess it was about 10,000. Then at one point, How to Use Social Media to Boost Sales

In this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we discuss how social media can help you grow sales quickly.

There are three aspects to sales growth with Social Media:

  • Visibility
  • Credibility
  • Differentiation

We look at each of these in this week’s who and go into detail on how you can use social media to leverage them.

Here is the transcript of this episode:

Hi everybody. Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sale Show. I am your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today, I thought we’d start off with a great question from one of our listeners. The question we’re going to get today is it’s something that comes up all the the time. I’ll explain why in a moment. Before we do that. I want to make sure that I introduce you to our fantastic, talented producer, Nancy Pop. Hi Nancy, how are you today?

Nancy: Hi Dave, I’m good. How are you doing?

Dave:   I’m fantastic, thank you. Nancy, why don’t read the question? Actually, you and I discussed the question before we came on the air. This is a question that I got from Jackie on Twitter. It’s a question about social media. Why don’t you go ahead and read us the question then we can have a conversation about it and talk a little bit more about how to leverage exactly what Jackie is talking about?

Nancy: Yes. I think Jackie had a really great question. A lot of people today will really benefit from hearing what you have to say. Her question is, how do I make best use of social media for selling my product? I have hundreds of people following me and connected to me on Facebook and Twitter, Instagram but I can never get them to buy anything.

Dave:   Right. You mentioned, we started out the conversation about this and I said, “No, no, no, let’s save it for the show because this could be great information that we could share with our viewers, better use would be sharing it with our viewers or our listeners. Go ahead and tell me what we were, start off with what we were talking about before we started the show today. You were saying?

Nancy: Yes. What I was saying was, I have a lot of friends or a lot of people that I’ve worked with in the past. They’re all trying to develop their lifestyle brand whether it’s through Instagram, or Twitter, or their Facebook page has thousands of followers. They just don’t, maybe they’re not good salesman or maybe they just don’t know how to utilize social media to get the most out of it but they’re having such a hard time redirecting people to their website or redirecting people to their sales or to their services whatever it is they’re trying to do. Maybe it’s a problem with the content they’re putting up, maybe it’s a problem with just, I don’t know. They’re just having problems doing it. It’s such a big problem for them.

Dave:   Yeah. I understand completely what you’re talking about. This is something that, just like Jackie said like you’re saying now I hear all the time. People go out and they connect with hundreds, dozens, thousand, tens of thousands of people on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, whatever the social media platform du jour is or the social media platforms that’s the most desirable platform for your target audience. You feel like you’re putting out great information but there’s no response in terms of converting people from folks who are just out there doing what appears to be lurking into converting them into sales. What do you do?

This question baffled me for, I want to say probably, I have to say the better part of 10 years. I’ll tell you, I’ll give you my history on Twitter for example. I was one of the early adopters of Twitter. I loved Twitter. I’ll give you a couple of examples of great relationships that I’ve developed through using Twitter.

My original Twitter handle was DLorenzo, DLORENZO. After a few years, I started using Twitter in 2006-2007, and really got into it in 2008. I had built my followers up to about, I guess it was about 10,000. Then at one point, I felt the same frustration, Nancy. You were discussing the same frustration that Jackie shared with us on Twitter in her question. I just abandoned it for 2 years. The reason I did was because I felt like I was putting so much energy and so much effort into it by sharing great information, I wasn’t getting anything out of it. Nobody was going to my website, they were reading articles, but nobody was calling me up saying, “Hey, I found you on Twitter and I want to give you $100,000”. That was the frustration I had.

What I didn’t understand at that time was that Twitter and social media as a whole isn’t about converting people into clients on the spot. In fact, the view that I should have had on social media is the exact same view I have of the 60 Second Sales process. For those of you who are new to the show, my process, the 60 Second Sales process is one of developing a relationship with someone that will last a lifetime. I liken it to falling in love at first sight with someone in a business setting.

You take 60 seconds and you sell yourself. You take 60 seconds and develop that relationship then the value that you receive over a lifetime is the by-product. In social media, I was thinking to myself, particularly on Twitter, I was thinking of that as a one night stand, right? That’s the way a lot of people think of sales.

“Oh, I’m going to go on Twitter. I’m going to put out a bunch of content for a week. People are going to come to me and want to spend money with me. They’re going to love me so much right away, they’re going to want to gender home with me right now tonight”. That’s not the way it works. It doesn’t work that way in business, for sales, and it doesn’t work that way on social media. Here is the conclusion that I’ve come to that I know now from my own experience and from the experience that I’ve seen my clients have. Here’s the conclusion that I’ve come to in social media and it’s the same conclusion that I’ve come to with sales. That is that it’s not enough just to put out great content. It’s not enough just to put out great information. You can’t be out there on “send” all the time and not develop relationships with people.

It would be better for you to have 10 real relationships on Instagram, 10 on Twitter, 10 on Facebook, 10 on Snapchat, give and take relationships where you can have conversations exchange information, deliver value to one another, build that up first over time, have 10 of those that you can count on for the long term. Then when you ask them to buy something they will actually buy. It would be better to have 10 of those than 100,000 people who you can send out great information to and they’ll read it, they’ll consume it. They’ll eat up whatever chum you’re throwing out there but they’re never going to provide any value back to you in return because you don’t have a relationship with them.

Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, they’re like going to a cocktail party. You go to the party and you meet some people. You hang out, you have a conversation. You know what? Friendship may or may not develop depending upon what you have in common and the value you can bring to one another, the value you can deliver to each other’s lives. If you’re not out there having conversations, exchanging value, developing relationships, you can expect that you’ll get exactly what you’re delivering from social media and that’s nothing. Do you deliver into social media? Nothing. You may be delivering a ton of value but you’re not listening to what the people actually want.

What does this mean for you and for marketing? Well, I’ll give you some thoughts on that in just a moment. Nancy, let’s get back to the folks who were developing lifestyle brands. There’s a couple of things in there that I think are worth exploring. You mentioned those two words, lifestyle and brand. The first thing I think we should talk about is the lifestyle element as a whole. When you sell a lifestyle brand, what does that exactly mean?

Nancy: It can mean several things. The way that social media is evolving now, you see people that are, they are developing entire careers off of Instagram. Whether it’s some girl that’s just posting sexy photos of herself and suddenly she’s bringing in $80k a year by being sponsored by T or Nike or whatever you know. People are making entire careers out of it. Or it can be someone that is launching their own yoga company. Now they’re blogging, they’re doing what you’re doing, they’re podcasting, they’re putting out videos and they’re selling their personal training.

People find ways now especially millennials. They’re taking so much advantage of social media and they’re figuring out new ways to use it for their benefit. People are developing these careers through photos or just blogging. The simplest things that, we would think it’s so easy but it takes a lot of work. It takes a lot of work and it takes a lot of ambition.

Dave:   I agree. I think there’s a whole host of things that you just covered in there. Some of them I think are fantastic. Others, I think in some ways they may have caught lightning in a bottle. There’s three elements to any good positioning, marketing or sales campaign. The three elements, and we can address exactly what you’re talking about under the umbrella of these three elements. The three elements are visibility, credibility and differentiation.

When we talk about the folks that you just mentioned, let’s take… first and foremost, let’s take somebody who’s looking to get sponsorships. You look for visibility and you say to yourself, “Okay, I want to be sponsored by Nike because I’m going to be able to attract 100,00 followers on Instagram. This is going to be valuable. This is going to be incredibly valuable if I attract 100,000 followers on Instagram. Nike is going to want to connect with me, they’re going to want to sponsor me because they’re going to want my 100,000 followers to put their eyeballs on Nike’s website or when Nike makes an offer, they’re going to want my 100,000 followers to see that offer because they know that they’ll convert one percent of those people and they’ll be thrilled with that 1% conversion.

That, for me, is a visibility play. If you have what it takes to develop 100,000 real, legitimate, responsive followers, then sure, I think that that makes complete and total sense. But for most of us who are in a business setting, you have a business that actually sells products or services. You’re not out there looking to just simply drive sponsorships, your purpose in life with visibility is to be able to go out and attract people  who’d be interested in what you have to say. Those people out there without come and connect with you on Instagram or on Facebook or on Twitter, they’re suspects. They’re people you suspect might want to do business with you someday.

But you don’t know that they are prospects and that’s a person who’s qualified, they have money, they have a problem you can solve, they have the ability to make a decision on whether or not they’ll hire you or buy your product. You don’t know if they’re ever going to be prospects. That’s the challenge of social media today. You develop all these followers and now I have something like rebuilt my Twitter following to 8500 people following me on Twitter which is okay. I guess it’s better than the average person but it’s nowhere near what successful business people have who really focus on Twitter have. I have over 9500 people connected to me on Instagram, 30,000 plus on LinkedIn and Facebook between combining all my pages, 2,000 or 3,000 people.

Those people who are out there on my social media sites, for me, I focus on having conversations, real conversations with them, understanding what they’re thinking, this is a huge value a social media provides. I can get inside their heads, understand what they’re thinking, see how they make… see, feel and hear how they make decisions and then I can use that information to reach them and people like them in a way that will resonate with them. For me, the smaller numbers, I’d love to have huge numbers. The smaller numbers enable me to have a more intimate relationship with the followers I have, with the people to whom I’m connected so that I can understand what process they go through when they buy products, or when they buy my services. This will help me craft better offers to them.

That’s what social media is all about. It expands the universe that not only we’re visible to but also that we can have legitimate, real conversations with and understand how they think. That’s, I think, one of the things that’s always been missing from the sales process. We go out there and when I say we, it’s the royal we. It’s all of us as professionals who are entrepreneurs, who are business people. We try and sell our services.

We sell our services based on the value we think we can provide to other people. We don’t really know if there’s a value that’s a byproduct of the service that we’re providing that we’re completely missing out on. I’ll give you an example.

A friends of mine wanted to stop smoking. She had smoked for her entire adult life. If you’ve ever met someone who’s in their 30s who wants to stop smoking or even older, it’s very, very difficult. Your body becomes addicted to nicotine very quickly. That addiction is strong. I think these days as people have grown up with a culture that is not accepting of smoking anymore, fewer and fewer people start smoking in their teenage years and continue through their adult years. But my friend had smoked her entire, from probably the age of 16 in high school up until the point where she was 33 and she wanted to quit.

She told her doctor during her physical that she wanted to quit and the doctor was thrilled and the doctor, “I’m going to help you. I’m going to put you on an anti-depressant product which suppresses the urge to smoke. It’s a product called [inaudible 00:15:00] and they give it to people who are prone to depression. It’s a breakthrough product in that area but it has an off label use. The off label is that it suppresses the desire to smoke. This works phenomenally well for my friend. She was able to wean herself off the medication after awhile. She’s been able to quit smoking. My point is that all of our services, all of our products have these off label uses if you will. These unintended consequences, the unintended value that we provide. Until we talk to our customers, until we talk to our clients, we may not recognize some of that value.

Social media provides you with the ability to have those conversations. If you have a product or you have a service and you know someone or you’re connected to someone like the person Nancy mentioned who has 100,000 followers, a great use of their sphere of influence, of their visibility, would be for you to send them your products, send them your service, have them discuss it on their social media platform. What they liked, what they didn’t like, have them show it in video form, have them post pictures of it so people can see it. There, the visibility the have on social media so Nike is sponsoring the person that Nancy mentioned, that visibility could be valuable and people could have conversations about all the different ways they derive value from the product or the service.

That is a great use of social media as a tool. Leverage somebody else’s visibility of you don’t have it so that they can see your product or your service. Now, I know what you’re thinking right? You’re out there thinking right now, well that’s great Dave if you’re manufacturing sneakers like Nike or you’re manufacturing yoga wear like Nike and people can wear it, other people can look at it and say whether they like it or not, but what if you provide a service? How can you demonstrate that service?

Well, I think, Nancy, you also mentioned something about trainors or yoga instructors, you could do things like before and after, transformational videos, transformational case studies where people start doing yoga today and they’re completely inflexible and you show videos of them and you instructing them. Then over time, every two or three weeks, we visit this person and see how they’re doing and we show that transformation over time. What does that do for you as a yoga instructor who’s building your social media base in trying to leverage social media. There’s a couple of things.

It enhances your credibility. Remember we said, visibility, credibility and differentiation were the three keys in any great sales or marketing campaign. It enhances your credibility because people are seeing an actual transformation take place on social media over time with this person and it also differentiates from everyone else who does what you do because people see you out there in real time helping someone. That’s value. That’s great value on social media and it’s value whether you’re delivering that value for 10 people who are highly engaged with whom you have a conversational relationship. It’s also great value if it’s 100,000 people.

The value of social media is there from a visibility standpoint, from a credibility standpoint, and from a differentiation standpoint. I’ll give you a couple of examples of relationships  that I’ve developed on social media that have become fantastic for me and that I would never have otherwise. Back in 2008 when I was first of Twitter. I met a guy who I started going back and forth with having 140 character conversations on Twitter mostly about football. He was a Miami Dolphins fan, I’m a Jet fan, and about practicing law in Florida. At that time, I was working with a lot of lawyers and it’s very difficult for lawyers to develop business in Florida. He happens to be an ethics lawyer who helps lawyers who get in trouble. We had those two things in common, football and the practice of law and the ethical way to develop client relationships.

We would go back and forth on twitter having conversations and discussions sometimes around articles that would appear in trade journals in the practice of law, sometimes around sports. Sometimes it’s just around Miami, the weather and stupid things that happen here. We developed this connection on Twitter. At one point he said to me, “You know, it might makes sense for us to get together for lunch since we both live in Miami”. We did, that was 8 years ago and we’ve been friends ever since. We’re close friends now. We see each other 2 or 3 times a month, for lunch and dinner. Our families are friends. A real, genuine has developed as well as a business relationship. I refer business to him, he refers business to me, we speak at some of the same conferences. That’s a relationship that developed strictly based upon social media, based upon Twitter, based upon a connection we made on Twitter. Social media has value but the value comes in developing the relationships just like in sales.

We talked about visibility, we talked about developing credibility using social media, now let’s talk about differentiation. This, for me, is the easiest one. So many of my clients struggle with, “Hey, Dave, how do I differentiate myself. I don’t know what I do that’s different than everybody else”. Well, remember when you were in kindergarten, when I was in kindergarten, my teacher’s name was Mrs. Fitzgerald. Mrs. Fitzgerald used to tell all of us that we were all unique, we were all like snowflakes, no two of us were the same, we were all different. Now look, that sounds like a bunch of crap, okay, it really does. But, it happens to be true. It sounds like a little, a lot of romp a room garbage but it really is true.

You’re different than I am, Nancy is different than I am, Nancy is different than you are, we’re all different sharing the way you approach things, sharing your own unique style, your own unique problem solving ability, your own personality that will differentiate you. I’m not kidding myself. There are a hundred or if not a thousand or ten thousand people out there that I can teach you how to sell stuff. I like my approach, my relationship-based approach. I think my approach is better than any other approach you’re going to find out there but I think the way I bring this information to you is what makes me different. The way you bring your product to your service to your clients, the way you deliver your value, your own unique style, that’s what makes you different. When you’re on social media, be yourself.

As we’re recording this show, this is, we’re like 3 weeks from a Presidential election in the United States. We have a candidate that has been essentially concocted out of reality television and Twitter, Donald Trump. Donald Trump’s campaign right now exists quit frankly because he has access to 12 million people on Twitter. Of the 12 million, a huge portion of them are media people who need a story to write. They need something to talk about on television. They need something to host a show about on radio. The fact that they have access to this guys and his stream of consciousness at 3:00 in the morning on Twitter makes him valuable to them. He brings his own unique style and bringing that style is part of his, I guess you’d say his brand, if you will. You have the same thing.

When you’re on Twitter, you got to let your personality show. When you’re on Facebook, you got to let your personality show. When you’re sharing stuff on social media, don’t try and play it middle of the road. You got to be out there laying it all on the line being yourself, having an opinion, that’s what people really get into.

If you’re not someone’s cup of tea. They’ll go away. Guess what, that vacuum will fill with people who you do resonate with. That vacuum will fill with people who want to have a relationship with you. Visibility, credibility, differentiation, those are the three ways you can make use of social media to be more attractive but at the end of the day, what it’s all about is developing relationships. Connecting with people, developing relationships and then gently put out a few offers here and there over time once you’ve exchanged some value with some people. You’ll find that the offers seem to work better. The reason is because it’s real now.

If I just throw a bunch of stuff out there and see what sticks, I’m like everybody else, I’m like McDonald’s advertising on TV. Throwing up a commercial, if you like the clown with the big red shoes and the nose, you’ll do business with me. No, that’s not the way social media works.

If you want to engage people on social media, you first go out and say, “Hey, what’s on your mind? What’s going on? I read the story today, here’s what I think about it. Anybody think anything about it? Yeah, this is my opinion, this is my opinion, great, happy to hear your opinion, let’s exchange, let’s have a conversation. Let’s exchange information about this specific topic in this article.” You do that a few times then you’ve got a relationship. You develop that relationship over time people want to hear more about you and what you do, guess what, you’re off to the races, that’s how you start client relationships. Real life, social media, not much different. It’s all about developing and building relationships over time.

Nancy, what do you think?

Nancy: I think the hardest part about it is the differentiation. I think there’s been such a huge, huge exponential increase in social media the past few years obviously. As more and more are figuring out how to use it and figuring out how to use it to their business advantage, it’s becoming increasingly difficult for people to find a way to stand out. How many yoga Instagram accounts are there? What else do we need to see? What else do we need to hear from people on Twitter? That’s definitely, for me anyways, the hardest part. It’s just figuring out your voice and unique content that hasn’t been heard or regurgitated a million times over.

Dave:   I get it. I totally get it. You’re right about that. There are thousands of people out there who are yoga instructors on Twitter. How many yoga instructors are there on Twitter now, or in Instagram now or on YouTube or even on Facebook who are demonstrating for example ways to teach yoga to develop mentally-challenged kids.

Nancy: See, that’s unique. That would catch my eye.

Dave:   Exactly. That’s exactly the point, right? How many yoga instructors are there out there now who are on YouTube demonstrating how yoga can be a value to veterans returning from Iraq with serious injuries?

Nancy: Right.

Dave:   Right? All of us have talent. We know if we’re lucky enough, if we’re fortunate enough, and we’ve done enough soul searching we know what that talent is. What you need to do is you need to find a way to develop talent so that its’ interesting to other people and it helps you start a conversation. If you’re a talented yoga instructor, you think of some of the unintended consequences of yoga. Well, it helps improve focus. Great. Let’s go take a handful of kids with ADD and let’s teach them yoga and see what happens, right?

With heir permission, with their parents’ permission, let’s record them and if it works out well, we’ll put it on YouTube and we’ll talk about it. Maybe by doing that, we’ll start a conversation with other people and that will help other people.

That would be a way to use your talent as yoga instructor to try and help improve focus in young people and, as long as it works well and you have everyone’s permission, there’s a happy by-product. The happy by-product is improved focus in these kids and perhaps somebody will see the video on YouTube and it will help them improve the life of their kid and that starts a really interesting conversation.

I think there are ways to differentiate yourself as long as you know you have that self-awareness you know where your talent lies. If you’re willing to go take that talent to a place that makes you… you’re willing to, Star Trek, you’re willi8ng to boldly go where no one has gone before, take your talent to a place where no one has gone before and you can differentiate yourself. It’d be hard for me to come up with a mundane area that you couldn’t differentiate yourself. For goodness’ sake, for years and years and years, I work with lawyers and accountants and then I help them differentiate themselves. If I could do it with lawyers and accountants, I can do it with you. My point is, everybody has a unique ability, everybody has talent, leverage your talent in a way that makes you interesting, compelling and you can start conversations and that’s what social media is all about.

Speaking of social media, my friends, if you have a question like the great question that Jackie asked us to kickoff our show today, reach out to me, the three primary social media platforms that I’m on all the time, dozens of times each day, Facebook, thedavelorenzo, Twitter, thedavelorenzo and Instagram, guess what it is, you got it, thedavelorenzo. Now, I post personal and business. I co-mingle it all together. It’s everywhere. You’re going to see business and personal stuff. Instagram especially. Instagram is a conflagration of my personal life and my business life. The Facebook page @thedavelorenzo is primarily business stuff, occasionally some personal will creep in. Twitter is business/personal. I talk about whatever you want to talk about. I talk about what interests me. That’s more of a conversational platform for me. I even put some politics on there because I like to get into fights with people and see what they think.

You only have one life so your business and your personal, combining the two, putting them both together, I think it makes you more interesting. When you’re more interesting, you’re someone who I want to have a relationship with. When you’re more interesting you’re someone I want to do business with because there’s plenty of boring people out there. I want to do business with people who are interesting.

Any final thoughts Nancy before we wrap up for today?

Nancy: Yes, I do have a final thought. What do you think is going to be the next best thing after social media? Or, do you think social media will really just be the end all be all?

Dave:   Wow, What a great question. Social media, I think the whole social from social media is going to go away. I think at some point, it’s just media. I think you’re going to find that something like YouTube is going to be the preferred way people watch what we now call television shows. The beauty of that is that you and I can have our own television show. It may be more interesting than some of the stuff that’s produced by Hollywood. I think video is going to expand even more. I think real time video is going to be something that is going, it’s already influencing the way we act, the way we behave.

You can see today, and I was just having this discussion and we should probably actually do an entire show on live video, I was just discussing how this epidemic of African-American men in particular about African-American people in the United States being shot, I never realized how bad it was, how many people are shot because of inherent bias. I’ve been exposed to this because of real-time video, because of Facebook live video, because of Periscope, because of People, videoing situations that come up where, we had one two months ago where an African-American man whose car broke down in the middle of the street. He’s standing there and the police are approaching him with their guns drawn, I’m white my car break down in the middle of the street, those cops are coming to me with a gas can and jumper cables.

They walk up to this gentleman with their guns drawn and he’s shot and killed. This happens a lot. This happens on average, after this being brought to my attention, this happens on average over 30 times a month. I’m not saying how many, I don’t… on average over 30 African-American men are shot by police each month. This is something that is coming to the forefront now because of live video.

I think that’s a very heavy serious topic and that’s something that we as a country have to address. An issue that serious coming to the forefront by live video demonstrates to us the power of this form of media. My opinion is that all of us from a business perspective which is serious to us from a day-to-day perspective of how we make our living, that’s going to be I think the thing that we all start to focus on. You get your box, you get your new shoes from Nike, my son, we just ordered my son cleats, baseball cleats. He gets his new baseball cleats, he’s excited. We do a live video, unboxing them, putting them on, how do they feel? “Oh, they feel great. I’m running around. I feel terrific in them.” He plays his first game, we do a live video of him wearing his Nike, stealing second base. That’s going to be the most powerful form of communication.

Nancy: That’s an advertisement right there.

Dave:   That’s exactly right. You know what? It’s a hundred times more believable as an advertisement than a Just Do It commercial with Derek Jeter stealing second base because, my kids are never going to run like Derek Jeter. I love him but he’s never going to be Derek Jeter, right? The fact that these shoes are effective for an everyday kid, making him more effective at stealing second base, that resonates with me because I have a regular kid. I don’t have Derek Jeter. I think you’re going to see stuff like that when it comes to social media, that where people are going to go to figure out what makes the most sense to buy.

You’re a grandmother. You want to buy a video game console for your kid. You don’t know anything about video consoles but you wrote down PlayStation, Xbox, PSP, you wrote down a bunch of names. What are you going to do? You’re going to go to your Facebook page and you’re going to post something, “Has anybody bought any one of these for their kids? what are they really like for video games? Let me know.”

Your friends, your grandma friends are going to chime in as to what they bought, then you’re going to do a search based on those results you get an you’re going to see what? You’re going to see testimonials, right? You’re going to see reviews. You’re going to see all this other stuff online. Then that’s going to take you to a video of someone actually using the product and showing you how easy or how difficult it is to use.

Now, you’ve gone in a span of a one hour time period or maybe they want to collecting information on Facebook 24 hours or 48 hour time period, you’ve gone from knowing nothing about video games to getting the exact video game your grandchild wanted for him for the holidays. That’s powerful.

I think to directly answer your question, the social part of social media is going to go away. It’s just going to become media. That’s going to be the way we make better decisions and all of our serious decisions about purchasing products and services, that’s going to be the way we consume our media. Television shows are no longer going to be limited to specific days and times. We can watch whatever we want, whenever we want. We can search for products on demand on our phones while we’re in a store or while in the dentist waiting room. I think the power of social media is here to stay. I think it’s just going to be just another way for us to get the information we need when we need it.

Nancy: I think also just to add my own little bit about it, virtual reality, I see that coming up more and more on my timeline. I think in the next 20-30 years, that’s going to be a huge game-changer.

Dave:   It’s funny you mentioned that. Those of you who connect with me on Instagram, I’ll go, after this show, I’m going to post on Instagram a shot of my son at Fenway Park in Boston playing a virtual reality baseball game. Fenway Park has this great section underneath the right field bleachers where you can bring kids before or during the game. They can put on these virtual reality headsets. It’s like a helmet with glasses and you’re actually on the field at Fenway Park with the real players while players are hitting the ball, throwing the ball, you’re catching it, it is really, really cool. The next generation of that is putting you in an actual game.

You’re standing next to the centerfielder while the ball is hit during the live game. That to me is amazing but the possibilities of that, you want to go to a resort, let’s say, and you want to go to a resort in Mexico and you’ve never been to this place in Mexico before. You can put on the virtual reality glasses, go to their website and guess what? You’re standing on the beach, their beach in Mexico looking around turning 360 degrees around actually experiencing what it will be like when you go there. That’s fantastic. I love virtual reality. I think you’re right. I think there’s a lot of really good stuff on the horizon with that.

All right folks, that’ll do it for this episode. We look forward to seeing you right back here next week. Remember, reach out to us on Facebook at thedavelorenzo, on Twitter at thedavelorenzo, and Instagram, of course, at thedavelorenzo.

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How to Use Social Media to Boost Sales In this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we discuss how social media can help you grow sales quickly. There are three aspects to sales growth with Social Media: Visibility Credibility How to Use Social Media to Boost Sales<br /> <br /> In this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show we discuss how social media can help you grow sales quickly.<br /> <br /> There are three aspects to sales growth with Social Media:<br /> <br /> Visibility<br /> Credibility<br /> Differentiation<br /> <br /> We look at each of these in this week's who and go into detail on how you can use social media to leverage them.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript of this episode:<br /> <br /> Hi everybody. Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sale Show. I am your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today, I thought we'd start off with a great question from one of our listeners. The question we're going to get today is it's something that comes up all the the time. I'll explain why in a moment. Before we do that. I want to make sure that I introduce you to our fantastic, talented producer, Nancy Pop. Hi Nancy, how are you today?<br /> <br /> Nancy: Hi Dave, I'm good. How are you doing?<br /> <br /> Dave:   I'm fantastic, thank you. Nancy, why don't read the question? Actually, you and I discussed the question before we came on the air. This is a question that I got from Jackie on Twitter. It's a question about social media. Why don't you go ahead and read us the question then we can have a conversation about it and talk a little bit more about how to leverage exactly what Jackie is talking about?<br /> <br /> Nancy: Yes. I think Jackie had a really great question. A lot of people today will really benefit from hearing what you have to say. Her question is, how do I make best use of social media for selling my product? I have hundreds of people following me and connected to me on Facebook and Twitter, Instagram but I can never get them to buy anything.<br /> <br /> Dave:   Right. You mentioned, we started out the conversation about this and I said, "No, no, no, let's save it for the show because this could be great information that we could share with our viewers, better use would be sharing it with our viewers or our listeners. Go ahead and tell me what we were, start off with what we were talking about before we started the show today. You were saying?<br /> <br /> Nancy: Yes. What I was saying was, I have a lot of friends or a lot of people that I've worked with in the past. They're all trying to develop their lifestyle brand whether it's through Instagram, or Twitter, or their Facebook page has thousands of followers. They just don't, maybe they're not good salesman or maybe they just don't know how to utilize social media to get the most out of it but they're having such a hard time redirecting people to their website or redirecting people to their sales or to their services whatever it is they're trying to do. Maybe it's a problem with the content they're putting up, maybe it's a problem with just, I don't know. They're just having problems doing it. It's such a big problem for them.<br /> <br /> Dave:   Yeah. I understand completely what you're talking about. This is something that, just like Jackie said like you're saying now I hear all the time. People go out and they connect with hundreds, dozens, thousand, tens of thousands of people on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, whatever the social media platform du jour is or the social media platforms that's the most desirable platform for your target audience. You feel like you're putting out great information but there's no response in terms of converting people from folks who are just out there doing what appears to be lurking into converting them into sales. What do you do?<br /> <br /> This question baffled me for, I want to say probably, I have to say the better part of 10 years. I'll tell you, I'll give you my history on Twitter for example. I was one of the early adopters of Twitter. I loved Twitter. I'll give you a couple of examples of great relationships that I've developed through using Twitter.<br /> <br /> My original Twitter handle was DLorenzo, DLORENZO. Dave Lorenzo clean 38:35
Secrets of Power Proposals https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/10/secrets-power-proposals/ Mon, 10 Oct 2016 16:00:17 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=783 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/10/secrets-power-proposals/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/10/secrets-power-proposals/feed/ 0 This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is titled "The Secrets of Power Proposals." When people are ready to do business, they ask you to put together a proposal to outline how you will work together. This is usually a "take it or leave it" offer. Either the client accepts your terms or he doesn't. The document you create does more than memorialize the terms of the deal. It serves as a platform for your relationship. Listen to this episode of our show to discover the five keys to developing a great proposal that gets the client to say "YES" every time. Here is the transcript of this week's show: Welcome, everyone, to another edition of "The 60 Second Sale" show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo, and on the other side of the proverbial glass we have Nancy Popp, our producer. Hello, Nancy. Hello, David. How are you? I'm great. How are you today? I'm doing fantastic. Terrific. Today we are going to talk about, we're going to reveal, the secrets of power proposals, and frankly, the reason we are talking about this today is I just went through a proposal process. I had three big proposals that I got out in the last week, two of them two days ago, and I am always tempted to do what everybody else does and get giddy when someone asks me for a proposal. You know how it goes. You're with a client or a prospective client and you're having a discussion and the client says something that just gets you all tingly inside. You feel like you have exactly the solution the client wants, and you can't wait to tell them about your great solution. You can't wait to tell them how easy it would be for them to work with you. You can't wait to get started. You wish you could start with this client today, and you get all excited. The client gets excited because they sense your ability to help them, and you say, "Great. Let me just jot some stuff down, and I'll be happy to shoot you over a proposal and you can let me know what you think." That's what everyone does, 98% of the world, the sales world, does that. For me, this week I had three proposals that I said that I had to get out, and it would have been so easy for me to just check off the box and say, "Hey, I'm going to send you out a proposal. I'm just going to get you some information and get it out to you, and then I'm going to wait," and here's why that is so tempting. When we send out a proposal it makes us feel good. When we send out a proposal we get to check that box off like I said, and then here's what happens. We have hope, right? I remember when I first started off selling stuff, way back when I was just a little itty-bitty baby salesperson. I would be thrilled, absolutely thrilled when someone said they wanted a proposal. I would write the proposal up, I would send it out as quickly as possible, and then I would go home and I would count my money, and I would think about how rich I was going to be because everybody who asks for a proposal is going to be a buyer. We have hope. That's what proposals do. They give us hope. My friends, that's not the purpose of a proposal, so I'm going to take you through a scenario. I'm going to take you through the current way you are doing things, and I'm going to take you through the way everybody does them, and then I'll take you through the power proposal way, and then I'll diagnose it for you. I'll break it down. You go out now and somebody calls you up on the phone and they say, let's say your name is, all, I don't know. Let's say your name is Dave. They call you up on the phone and they say, "Hey, Dave. I heard that you teach salespeople to be more successful. I've got 12 salespeople in my company. We do $2 million a year. Each salesperson is responsible for doing $150,000 a year. I'd like them to go from $150,000 a year to $200,000 a year, and our average transaction size is $5000, so we really need you to help them grow by maybe doing 10 new transactions a year. Can you do this, Dave?" For me, that's easy. I could do that easily. This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is titled “The Secrets of Power Proposals.”

When people are ready to do business, they ask you to put together a proposal to outline how you will work together. This is usually a “take it or leave it” offer. Either the client accepts your terms or he doesn’t.

The document you create does more than memorialize the terms of the deal. It serves as a platform for your relationship.

Listen to this episode of our show to discover the five keys to developing a great proposal that gets the client to say “YES” every time.

Here is the transcript of this week’s show:

Welcome, everyone, to another edition of “The 60 Second Sale” show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo, and on the other side of the proverbial glass we have Nancy Popp, our producer. Hello, Nancy.

Hello, David. How are you?

I’m great. How are you today?

I’m doing fantastic.

Terrific. Today we are going to talk about, we’re going to reveal, the secrets of power proposals, and frankly, the reason we are talking about this today is I just went through a proposal process. I had three big proposals that I got out in the last week, two of them two days ago, and I am always tempted to do what everybody else does and get giddy when someone asks me for a proposal.

You know how it goes. You’re with a client or a prospective client and you’re having a discussion and the client says something that just gets you all tingly inside. You feel like you have exactly the solution the client wants, and you can’t wait to tell them about your great solution. You can’t wait to tell them how easy it would be for them to work with you. You can’t wait to get started. You wish you could start with this client today, and you get all excited. The client gets excited because they sense your ability to help them, and you say, “Great. Let me just jot some stuff down, and I’ll be happy to shoot you over a proposal and you can let me know what you think.”

That’s what everyone does, 98% of the world, the sales world, does that. For me, this week I had three proposals that I said that I had to get out, and it would have been so easy for me to just check off the box and say, “Hey, I’m going to send you out a proposal. I’m just going to get you some information and get it out to you, and then I’m going to wait,” and here’s why that is so tempting. When we send out a proposal it makes us feel good. When we send out a proposal we get to check that box off like I said, and then here’s what happens. We have hope, right?

I remember when I first started off selling stuff, way back when I was just a little itty-bitty baby salesperson. I would be thrilled, absolutely thrilled when someone said they wanted a proposal. I would write the proposal up, I would send it out as quickly as possible, and then I would go home and I would count my money, and I would think about how rich I was going to be because everybody who asks for a proposal is going to be a buyer. We have hope. That’s what proposals do. They give us hope.

My friends, that’s not the purpose of a proposal, so I’m going to take you through a scenario. I’m going to take you through the current way you are doing things, and I’m going to take you through the way everybody does them, and then I’ll take you through the power proposal way, and then I’ll diagnose it for you. I’ll break it down.

You go out now and somebody calls you up on the phone and they say, let’s say your name is, all, I don’t know. Let’s say your name is Dave. They call you up on the phone and they say, “Hey, Dave. I heard that you teach salespeople to be more successful. I’ve got 12 salespeople in my company. We do $2 million a year. Each salesperson is responsible for doing $150,000 a year. I’d like them to go from $150,000 a year to $200,000 a year, and our average transaction size is $5000, so we really need you to help them grow by maybe doing 10 new transactions a year. Can you do this, Dave?”

For me, that’s easy. I could do that easily. I could teach someone to close 10 new deals a year, absolutely. I don’t care if you’re selling private jets or if you’re selling legal services or if you’re selling vacuums door-to-door. I can get you to close 10 more deals a year. That’s less than one a month. I can help you do that. Absolutely I can help you do that. That’s what I’m thinking in my mind, so my reaction is to ask a few questions, find out about their process, find out what these 10 deals will be valued at per person, what that would mean to the company overall, what that would mean to the person I have on the phone. I get all that information and then I say, this is the traditional way, I say, “Let me come over and do a presentation to you.” Then I go over and do the presentation.

After the presentation, everybody thinks everything is great. We’re all friends. Everything’s happy, everybody’s happy, then they say, “Why don’t you give us a proposal?” I say, “Sure.” I write up the proposal, one number, send it over, and then I wait, and I wait, and I wait. All the while, the first two or three days that I’m waiting I’m getting rich. I’m thinking to myself, “I could close 20 of these deals. These people love for me. They’re going to do business with me forever.”

Then, like a jury being out, the longer it goes, the worse the verdict is going to be. Three or four days goes by. Five days goes by, I don’t hear anything. A week goes by, maybe two weeks goes by. Do I call them? Do I seem desperate if I call them? Maybe they haven’t made their decision. Maybe the decision-maker is away, he’s in Europe with his family, and I wait, and a lot of times I never hear anything back, and then when I do hear something back it’s, “Oh, we’re sorry. We went in a different direction,” and usually I hear that after I call four weeks later, because you don’t want to seem desperate.

That’s the old way. That’s the old way of doing things. That may be the way that you do things when it comes to your proposal process. I want you to scrap that. We don’t do that anymore. Here’s how we do proposals. A proposal simply confirms a discussion you’ve already had. There’s this game among those of us in sales that we play. It’s like an Easter egg hunt. I guess what number you can pay, and then my goal is to try and get as close to that number as possible, maybe go a little bit over it so that I can make the most money possible, and that game sucks. It sucks for you, the salesperson, and it sucks for the guy on the other side of the table, it sucks for the person who is buying your services, so here’s what we do to proposals.

We talk about the numbers as soon as we can in the process. As soon as it’s appropriate we talk about the numbers. We throw it right out there. “What’s your budget for this?” and then the client will always say, “I don’t really have a budget,” right? How dumb is that? “I don’t really have a budget.” Of course. What I say to people when they say, “I don’t have a budget,” what I say to them is I say, “You got a number in mind that you were thinking of paying. Why don’t you tell me what that number is?”

Then they say, “We really haven’t done this before. I’m not really sure.” Then I tell them, “All right, here’s what we’ll do. You think about that number, then cut it in half and tell me what it is.” Basically I cannot give you a proposal unless I know what you are prepared to spend. Can’t do it. I just can’t do it, because I’m not going to sit down and customize an entire program for you if you don’t have the money to pay me. I’m not going to do it, so here’s how you go about doing a proposal.

You have that whole diagnostic conversation up front. “Tell me about your business. Tell me what you’re looking to accomplish. Tell me how you think I can help you. Tell me what your budget is. Oh, you don’t have a budget? Okay, well, let’s talk about the return on investment from this initiative. Let’s talk about how much money you’re going to make as a result of the product that I’m going to sell you or how much money you’re going to make as a result of the service I’m going to provide for you. Okay, we have a significant return on investment. I get it. That’s great. Now, let’s talk about what my service will cost and then we can look at what the actual return on investment will be.”

Then you have a discussion about what your service will cost, transparent, completely transparent. By the time you finish that conversation, you and the client are in agreement on what the price is going to be, and then you send over a proposal. You never, ever send someone a proposal unless it’s to confirm a conversation that you already had. I’m going to say that again, because it’s so important. You never send a proposal to someone unless it’s to confirm a conversation that has already taken place, so you and the client have to agree on a price before you can send over a proposal.

Now, in every proposal there are five things, there’s five secrets. That’s the title of this episode of “The 60 Second Sale” show. There are five secrets to power proposals, so today I’m going to cover those five secrets with you and it’s going to fundamentally change the way you do business. It’s going to take off all the pressure, because you’ll know when you send over the proposal whether you’ve got a deal or not, and you’ll know when that proposal is going to be signed, and you’ll know when the money is going to hit your bank account. Here are now the five secrets of power proposals.

Secret number one: You never give a proposal to someone who can only say no. Never give a proposal to someone who can only say no. Now, you know who these people are. They’re the people who placed the initial call to you and they blow all kinds of sunshine up your butt and they tell you how great their company is and how much they’re looking forward to doing business with you. Really what they’re doing is they’re gathering information for someone else to make a decision, and these people, you can’t give them proposals because the proposal will sit in their desk for months on end, and they’ll gather information and they’ll gather information and nothing will ever happen

People in human resources are famous for this, by the way, so if you work in a field where someone with a title of Chief Human Resource Officer or Executive Vice President of Human Resources is the person who you normally talk to, that’s a terrible person to talk to. Also, anyone with procurement or supply chain in their business title, Executive Vice President of Procurement or Senior Vice President of Supply Chain Operations. Those people are terrible people to talk to because they gather information and then someone else makes the decision.

What I want you to do when you’re talking to the person who’s on the phone with you, I want you to say, “Here’s our process for doing business with folks. We gather as much information as we can,” this is you, the salesperson or the business owner, “We gather as much information as we can, and then we like to have a frank discussion about the pricing and the return on investment from our services or from our product. Now, Mr. Inquirer, is there anyone else in your company we need to get involved in this decision-making process, because when we have this discussion about pricing, I will need a yes or a no in order to continue to move forward. I cannot, ethically, I cannot have a discussion with folks who can only say no, or I cannot have a discussion with folks who don’t have the ability to say yes to a proposal, so who else in your company, if there’s anyone else, do we need to involve in this process?” Be very direct, be very forceful.

Now I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking, “Wow, if I say that, the person’s going to hang up the phone.” There is a possibility that the person will say, “Well then I can’t deal with you,” but there’s also the possibility that the person will say, “Okay, great. We’re going to get Mr. Smith involved. He owns the company.”

Now, if the person says, “Well then I can’t deal with you,” that person is doing you a huge favor, because that person had no authority to say yes. They only had the authority to say no. They would have given you false hope. Let them hang up the phone before you ever do a proposal or waste your time throwing numbers out there without ever having an opportunity to get any business.

The first thing you need to make sure of is you need to make sure that you have a decision-maker who is going to discuss this proposal with you, have a decision-maker who is going to review your proposal options, and make sure you’re talking to a decision-maker. You also want to make sure that these people have money, so when you get the decision-maker on the phone you say, “What’s your budget?” He’s going to say, “I don’t have a budget.” Remember? I just went through this whole thing. “I don’t have a budget.” They all say that, right?

You say, “Look. I’ve got to be frank with you. Everybody tells me they don’t have a budget, but you have a number that you’ve planned to spend. If it’s based on return on investment, that’s fine. I can tell you what the return on investment from our services will be, and as long as the return on investment is fair and you agree that it’s fair then we’ll move forward, but I need to know what numbers we are working with here, and I’m not going to just submit a proposal blind. I can do it, because what happens is when I submit proposals blind everyone uses me as a benchmark and then people undercut me, and I’m not going to have that happen, so tell me what you’re prepared to spend or what your measurement of a return on investment for this initiative really is.”

Then the final thing is you need to make sure that they have a problem that you can solve. This is all step one, by the way, so they have a problem that you can solve. Sometimes people will come to me and they’ll say, “Listen, we need to fire our Executive Vice President of Sales. Will you help me recruit a new Executive Vice President of Sales?” and I say, “I can tell you what the qualities of a great EVP of Sales are, but I don’t do recruiting. That’s not my thing. I’ll introduce you to a great recruiter. I’ll help you build a job description, but the recruiter is the one who has to go out and find the person for you.”

That person doesn’t have, the person who is talking to me doesn’t have a problem I can solve, so it’s not worth it for me to sit down and even entertain doing a proposal for them, so step one, make sure that you’re qualified. Make sure that the business is qualified. That means that you’re talking to a person who has the ability to make a decision, the company that you’re talking to has money to spend on your services, the right amount of money, and they have a problem you can solve.

Step two in the secrets of power proposal: You are the last or the only proposal that they’re submitting. You don’t want to be the rabbit. You don’t want to be the one who’s pacing everyone else. You don’t want to be the benchmark that everyone else discounts their pricing off of. You tell people point-blank, “I don’t want to be the person to throw out a number and then have you compare my proposal to everybody else, so if you’re shopping around, I appreciate it. Go shop around. Come to me last, and if you are shopping around and you’re coming to me last, you have to discuss the other proposals with me or we’re not going to do business. That’s just the way I work.”

You see, the thing that’s different here, the thing that’s different here is you are in a partnership with the person you’re talking to, and you’re deciding whether or not you’re going to work together. This is not you out there chasing business. This is you and your potential client saying to one another, “Here are my business terms. What are your business terms? Okay, that’s great. Let’s talk about numbers. If the numbers fit, we’ll work together. If the numbers don’t fit, I appreciate the opportunity. Go hire someone else. Thank you so much for coming by.”

This is a partnership. This isn’t you sucking up to get business, and too many times when we are delivering proposals it’s people sucking up to get business, so you have to be the last or the only person who’s involved in this. Now preferably your services or your product will be so different, so disruptive, that you’re the only person in the market and people can’t compare themselves to you, but in the event that it’s a beauty contest, in the event that there are multiple people coming through here offering proposals, you want to be the last one. All right.

Step three in the secrets of power proposals is that you are confirming a discussion with a written document. Don’t be coy. We said this at the outset. You have a conversation with your client up front and you say, “Okay, if I understand you correctly, you’re looking for a three to five times return on investment, so my services are $50,000. That means that we have to do $200,000 in business as a result of our work together in order for you to get a return on investment that you would be happy with. Is that correct?” “Yes.” “Perfect. I’m going to submit a proposal to you that is for $50,000, and I will promise you that we’ll do $200,000 in return on investment as long as everything goes as planned. If that is agreeable to you, I’ll send you the proposal.”

The person says yes, he’s agreeable to that. You write up the proposal, send it over. Very easy process, because you’ve discussed everything up front. You verbally confirmed everything up front before you’ve ever gotten into this conversation. A proposal is just a document that memorializes that discussion.

Step four in the secrets of power proposals is OTTO: Offer three terrific options. Offer three terrific options. We call it OTTO. The reason you offer three terrific options is because you never want to be a binary choice. You never want the client to say yes or no, so here’s how this works. Option number one is slightly below the number that they’re comfortable paying, just slightly. Option number two is on target with the number they’re comfortable paying, and option number three is a home run. Always offer that third option. In some cases, option number one can be the number they’re comfortable paying, option number two can be slightly above, and option number three can be double or can be a home run.

The reason you offer three options is because you want to give them multiple choices of yes, and we’re going to do a whole podcast on how to structure options, but what I can tell you right now is one of those options has to be spot on the number they’ve agreed to pay. Either it’s their budget number or it’s the number you’ve discussed. Then one of those numbers is something that you’ve discussed that is a preventative measure to keep this problem from ever happening again or it’s a bundle of services or it’s a number of different things that they’ve always wanted to do but never had the guts to put in the budget. You always want a home run option, so you always have one number that’s spot on the budget, you always have another number that’s a home run option.

If there are multiple people in the mix you may want to have a number that’s a little bit below what the budget was. If there are not multiple people in the mix, if you’re the only person or you’re the last person, then one number is the budget, the second number is the budget plus something that would be nice for them to have, and the third number is a number where it’s the number that they had in mind, it’s the service that they had in mind plus something that will prevent this problem from ever occurring again.

You see where I’m going with this. You’re offering people ways to say yes. You’re offering them options, multiple options for saying yes to you instead of just saying, “Here’s the number. Take it or leave it,” because when you say to people, “Take it or leave it,” it’s a psychological error on your part. You’re creating acrimony. They feel like they’re packed into a corner, and you never want to do that. When you give them options, two things happen. They’re buying now. You’re not selling them. They get to make a great choice. They get to show how smart they are by making a fantastic decision.

The other thing that happens when you offer multiple options is they don’t negotiate with you. If you offer them multiple options and they don’t have the budget, instead of them coming back to you and saying, “Well, can you cut the price by 10%?” you say to them, “Well, I have this other option there. That’s the option you should take if you don’t have the amount of money that we originally discussed.” Options create choice. Choice makes the buying decision easier, and it makes the entire experience more pleasurable.

The final secret of power proposals, secret number five, is you have to schedule a discussion and a decision right when you send the proposal, so here’s what I always do. We always talk about the number up front. “Okay, it’s $50,000 you want to spend based on a $200,000 return on investment. I will put this together in writing and I will get it to you within 24 hours. You’ll have it by close of business tomorrow, and when I get you the proposal by close of business tomorrow let’s agree that the day after tomorrow we’re going to have a call. Are you free at 11:00? At 11:00 we’ll have a call and we’ll decide whether or not we’re going to move forward at that time. After that call, you can sign the document and send it over if the answer is yes. If the answer is no then we’ll agree to part company as friends, but we are going to make that decision the day after tomorrow at 11:00. Great? Great.”

Then we have that discussion. It’s either a yes or a no. Then we are done. It’s over. Don’t leave yourself in limbo. I know as salespeople we love that hope. As long as that hope is out there, I can be a millionaire in my mind. Don’t leave yourself in limbo. Schedule a time for a decision. Schedule a deadline. Schedule a time to discuss the proposal and be done with it, and everyone can make that deadline within 24 to 48 hours. I can’t even imagine somebody saying, “Well, we’re going to make the decision in six weeks.”

Well then come to me for a proposal in six weeks. No. You don’t give a proposal to someone who’s not ready to make a decision, right? We discussed that right at the top of the show today, so you can tell them, “You’re going to get a proposal. We’re going to have a discussion. Within 48 hours we’ll wrap it up and decide whether we’re going to work together or not,” and then you can make the payment terms whatever you want to make them. They can pay at a certain date, but you want the proposal signed and back in your office within 48 hours, so those are the five steps, the five secrets, of power proposals.

Number one: Qualify the opportunity. That means make sure that there’s money, the ability of the person on the other end of the proposal process to make a decision, and a problem you can solve. Step number two: You want to be the last or only person, the last or only person, to be offering a proposal, to offer a proposal. Step three: A proposal just confirms a discussion. Don’t be coy. Talk about numbers before you ever send a document. It doesn’t make sense, don’t waste your time writing a proposal. Step four: OTTO. Offer three terrific options. Step five: Schedule a discussion. Give them a deadline for making a decision.

It’s very simple, my friends. This is so simple. We make it too complicated. Go out today. All your proposals, just do it. Get it done this way. You will be amazed at how less complicated your life becomes, how much better you sleep at night, and how quickly you close deals. Start making things complicated. Use these five steps to get your proposals out the door and get the money in the bank. All right?

It’s that time of the show. Last few minutes of the show today we are going to take a question, and by the way, if you want to send us a question, the best way to do it is on social media. You can find me on Facebook, @TheDaveLorenzo. Put the word “the” in front of my name, @TheDaveLorenzo. On Instagram, if you love pictures, I got them for you. You love short videos, I got them for you. Go to Instagram, @thedavelorenzo. In the comments, drop a question. Be happy to answer it for you on the show. On Twitter, hit me up, @TheDaveLorenzo, @TheDaveLorenzo. You see a theme there? Every single one of the social media outlets where you can send me a question is “The Dave Lorenzo.”

Nancy Popp, we have a question today. What is it and where’s it from?

We have a question today from Janice Mullaney. She’s from [inaudible 00:25:39] Massachusetts and she asks, “What do I do when I have to participate in a multiperson proposal process?”

Ah, so it’s a beauty contest. Some businesses, I get it, some businesses do have these beauty contests, so for example if you work with the government they are required, oftentimes, either state, local, or federal government, they’re required to get at least three proposals. If you work in a big company, when I worked for Marriott we had to get three proposals on all major projects, all projects that were over, I think, $10,000 at the time required three different bids, three different proposals, so Janice, thank you for your question. You’re asking if you’ve got to participate in a beauty show, you’ve got to participate in a beauty contest, which is what we call multiple proposal environment, what do you do?

Well, you know from our five secrets you want to be the last person to bid, so what I ask for is I always ask to be last look. I always say, “Listen. I want to give you the best possible deal, so do me a favor and tell me what your lowest bid is, and if I think I can come in with a better return on investment than those people are providing,” notice I’m not saying that I’m going to undercut their proposal, I’m just going to make a better return on investment, so I could be a little bit more, “if I think I can do a better return on investment I will figure out a way to do that. If I can’t provide you with a better return on investment, I will bow out but you’ll save me a lot of time.”

Fifty-fifty shot as to whether they give you that “last look,” whether they give you the opportunity to take a look at all the other proposals and see what you can do for them, so that’s the first thing. You say, “Can I have last look?” If they say no, then you say, “Okay. When it comes to presentations, then, I want to present last and give you my proposal last because I need a yes or a no within 48 hours.”

If they say, “Well, we can’t give you last look and we can’t give you a yes or no within 48 hours,” then you say, “Look. I don’t like throwing darts at a board, and me giving you a proposal would just be throwing darts at a board, so you got to give me more than that,” and then if you’re in a government area or if you’re in an area where just the way they do things is you give three proposals and this is how it’s done, then the least thing you can do, or the least you can do is you say, listen, can I write the guidelines for the proposal for you, so that you’re the person who actually creates the guidelines, and you make them so stringent that only your company can match them.

If none of those things work and you got to send a proposal in the blind, I’m sorry. That’s not a business that I advocate. I would just blow up that model and move on, try and find another market. Any time you’ve got someone pitting you against another company and another company’s solution, that’s never going to wind up good. It’s never going to wind up working out well for you. Any time two people are pitted against one another, one of the two of them ends up being a loser, so those are the three things I think you should do, Janice.

First you go into them, you say, “Can I have last look?” If they say, “No, we are not going to show you the other stuff,” then you say, “All right, I want to present last, but I want to make sure that when I give you my proposal you have 48 hours, yes or no, you give me an answer.” If they say, “No, that’s not going to work,” then I would bow out, but if you have to, what I would say is, “Listen, can I write the proposal specs for you so that I make sure that you’re getting everything you need, and then only your company, only your company can meet those specs, hopefully,” that’s the last opportunity for you there.

If none of those things are available to you, if they say no to all three of them, you’re in a crappy business, Janice. You got to get out, because that’s just absolutely horrible and you’re a good salesperson. There are other places you can go where you can be in a true partnership with your potential client, and that’s what the proposal really highlights. It highlights the strength of your partnership. You’re out there delivering this information to your client because you want to help them become more successful. You want to help them. That’s what you do.

That’s what this process is all about. It’s not a win-lose. It’s a win-win for you and your client. Janice, thank you so much for the question. Nancy Popp, thank you so much for your hard work and your efforts as always, and until next time, folks, I will see you right here at “The 60 Second Sale” show. I hope you make a great living and live a great life.

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This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is titled "The Secrets of Power Proposals." When people are ready to do business, they ask you to put together a proposal to outline how you will work together. This is usually a "take it or leave it" offer. This episode of the 60 Second Sales Show is titled "The Secrets of Power Proposals."<br /> <br /> When people are ready to do business, they ask you to put together a proposal to outline how you will work together. This is usually a "take it or leave it" offer. Either the client accepts your terms or he doesn't.<br /> <br /> The document you create does more than memorialize the terms of the deal. It serves as a platform for your relationship.<br /> <br /> Listen to this episode of our show to discover the five keys to developing a great proposal that gets the client to say "YES" every time.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript of this week's show:<br /> <br /> Welcome, everyone, to another edition of "The 60 Second Sale" show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo, and on the other side of the proverbial glass we have Nancy Popp, our producer. Hello, Nancy.<br /> <br /> Hello, David. How are you?<br /> <br /> I'm great. How are you today?<br /> <br /> I'm doing fantastic.<br /> <br /> Terrific. Today we are going to talk about, we're going to reveal, the secrets of power proposals, and frankly, the reason we are talking about this today is I just went through a proposal process. I had three big proposals that I got out in the last week, two of them two days ago, and I am always tempted to do what everybody else does and get giddy when someone asks me for a proposal.<br /> <br /> You know how it goes. You're with a client or a prospective client and you're having a discussion and the client says something that just gets you all tingly inside. You feel like you have exactly the solution the client wants, and you can't wait to tell them about your great solution. You can't wait to tell them how easy it would be for them to work with you. You can't wait to get started. You wish you could start with this client today, and you get all excited. The client gets excited because they sense your ability to help them, and you say, "Great. Let me just jot some stuff down, and I'll be happy to shoot you over a proposal and you can let me know what you think."<br /> <br /> That's what everyone does, 98% of the world, the sales world, does that. For me, this week I had three proposals that I said that I had to get out, and it would have been so easy for me to just check off the box and say, "Hey, I'm going to send you out a proposal. I'm just going to get you some information and get it out to you, and then I'm going to wait," and here's why that is so tempting. When we send out a proposal it makes us feel good. When we send out a proposal we get to check that box off like I said, and then here's what happens. We have hope, right?<br /> <br /> I remember when I first started off selling stuff, way back when I was just a little itty-bitty baby salesperson. I would be thrilled, absolutely thrilled when someone said they wanted a proposal. I would write the proposal up, I would send it out as quickly as possible, and then I would go home and I would count my money, and I would think about how rich I was going to be because everybody who asks for a proposal is going to be a buyer. We have hope. That's what proposals do. They give us hope.<br /> <br /> My friends, that's not the purpose of a proposal, so I'm going to take you through a scenario. I'm going to take you through the current way you are doing things, and I'm going to take you through the way everybody does them, and then I'll take you through the power proposal way, and then I'll diagnose it for you. I'll break it down.<br /> <br /> You go out now and somebody calls you up on the phone and they say, let's say your name is, all, I don't know. Let's say your name is Dave. They call you up on the phone and they say, "Hey, Dave. I heard that you teach salespeople to be more successful. I've got 12 salespeople in my company. We do $2 million a year. Each salesperson is responsible for doing $150,000 a year. I'd like them to go from $150,000 a year to $200,000 a year, Dave Lorenzo clean 30:34
How To Be A Good Liar https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/03/how-to-be-a-good-liar/ Mon, 03 Oct 2016 16:00:57 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=737 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/03/how-to-be-a-good-liar/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/10/03/how-to-be-a-good-liar/feed/ 0 How To Be A Good Liar Lying is bad when you do it to hurt someone else.  But there are three specific occasions when it is perfectly acceptable to lie. That's the topic of discussion today on the 60 Second Sales Show. Here is the transcript from this show: Hi there, everyone. Welcome to another edition of The 60 Second Sale Show. I'm Dave Lorenzo, and here with us we have our fantastic and talented producer, Nancy Pop. Good morning, Nancy. How are you today? Good morning. I'm doing great. How about you? I am absolutely fantastic. Today we have a great topic we're going to talk about. The topic is how to be a good liar. Now, Nancy, I know you are a fabulous and virtuous person, but have you ever had occasion to tell someone a lie? Even just a little white lie, like a little fib? Of course. It's only natural. It's only natural. Of course. Now, when, for example, would you tell someone something that wasn't true? I think the first instance that comes to mind is when maybe you're running late to work or something, because you slept in, and you're embarrassed to just admit that you slept in. Something small like that. Right. You're embarrassed. It's kind of a face saving move. It's like a self-preservation move. That's one of the times when all of us have, in the past, every one of us, have told a lie. We've told something that wasn't true. We're going to get into the three times when we tell lies. The three most frequent times when we tell lies. We're going to talk about why we do it, and we're going to talk about how to do it in a way that is not going to do damage to someone else. Really, in the end, when it comes to lying, and this is such an explosive topic. When it comes to lying, the reason that we teach our kids not to lie, the reason that we're told not to lie, is because we're afraid we're going to do harm to someone else. If it weren't to do harm to anyone, would it be okay to lie? Don't answer that. We're going to get to that in just a moment. Before we do, I want to cover just a couple of things that are going on today that have made this topic kind of top of mind for me, and a couple of other things that I've noticed that really have gotten under my skin. Everybody seems to like it, Nancy, when I kind of use this as a cathartic experience. I use this platform. I use the 60 Second Sale Show as a cathartic experience to kind of clear the air and make myself feel better. I'll tell you, frankly, it's cheaper than therapy, and I don't mind doing it. Today, one of the things that I am absolutely livid about is, I posted something on Instagram. Those of you who follow me on Instagram, @TheDaveLorenzo, I posted one of these pithy quotes. I used to quote other people. Now, I just quote myself. It's fun, and nobody can dispute the source, right? I quote myself, and yesterday, I quoted myself, and in the quote, I made a typo. It was a typo. Not a big deal. Quite frankly, I make a lot of typos. I write really quickly. If you go to DaveLorenzo.com, that site has been up for, like, three months. I've got 105 articles on there already. I write a lot, and when you write as quickly as I do, you're going to make mistakes. I get out of the shower yesterday. Something comes to mind. I put up a little pithy quote. I drop it in there, and I post it. 26, 27 people like it in the first 10 minutes. I don't pay any attention to it. This morning, I go to post something else, or I posted a video last night after that. I go to post something else this morning, I notice some guy makes a comment, some jerk makes a comment, and the comment is that I've damaged my credibility irreparably by making the typo. Now, my friends, the typo was, I was missing an apostrophe. I missed an apostrophe. It's not like I completely blew a word. I missed an apostrophe. If that damages my credibility with you, honestly, you're in the wrong place. Typos are free. They're my gift to the world, all right? It's just a little something extra I throw in there... How To Be A Good Liar

Lying is bad when you do it to hurt someone else.  But there are three specific occasions when it is perfectly acceptable to lie. That’s the topic of discussion today on the 60 Second Sales Show.

Here is the transcript from this show:

Hi there, everyone. Welcome to another edition of The 60 Second Sale Show. I’m Dave Lorenzo, and here with us we have our fantastic and talented producer, Nancy Pop. Good morning, Nancy. How are you today?

Good morning. I’m doing great. How about you?

I am absolutely fantastic. Today we have a great topic we’re going to talk about. The topic is how to be a good liar. Now, Nancy, I know you are a fabulous and virtuous person, but have you ever had occasion to tell someone a lie? Even just a little white lie, like a little fib?

Of course. It’s only natural.

It’s only natural. Of course. Now, when, for example, would you tell someone something that wasn’t true?

I think the first instance that comes to mind is when maybe you’re running late to work or something, because you slept in, and you’re embarrassed to just admit that you slept in. Something small like that.

Right. You’re embarrassed. It’s kind of a face saving move. It’s like a self-preservation move. That’s one of the times when all of us have, in the past, every one of us, have told a lie. We’ve told something that wasn’t true. We’re going to get into the three times when we tell lies. The three most frequent times when we tell lies. We’re going to talk about why we do it, and we’re going to talk about how to do it in a way that is not going to do damage to someone else. Really, in the end, when it comes to lying, and this is such an explosive topic. When it comes to lying, the reason that we teach our kids not to lie, the reason that we’re told not to lie, is because we’re afraid we’re going to do harm to someone else.

If it weren’t to do harm to anyone, would it be okay to lie? Don’t answer that. We’re going to get to that in just a moment. Before we do, I want to cover just a couple of things that are going on today that have made this topic kind of top of mind for me, and a couple of other things that I’ve noticed that really have gotten under my skin. Everybody seems to like it, Nancy, when I kind of use this as a cathartic experience. I use this platform. I use the 60 Second Sale Show as a cathartic experience to kind of clear the air and make myself feel better. I’ll tell you, frankly, it’s cheaper than therapy, and I don’t mind doing it.

Today, one of the things that I am absolutely livid about is, I posted something on Instagram. Those of you who follow me on Instagram, @TheDaveLorenzo, I posted one of these pithy quotes. I used to quote other people. Now, I just quote myself. It’s fun, and nobody can dispute the source, right? I quote myself, and yesterday, I quoted myself, and in the quote, I made a typo. It was a typo. Not a big deal. Quite frankly, I make a lot of typos. I write really quickly. If you go to DaveLorenzo.com, that site has been up for, like, three months. I’ve got 105 articles on there already. I write a lot, and when you write as quickly as I do, you’re going to make mistakes.

I get out of the shower yesterday. Something comes to mind. I put up a little pithy quote. I drop it in there, and I post it. 26, 27 people like it in the first 10 minutes. I don’t pay any attention to it. This morning, I go to post something else, or I posted a video last night after that. I go to post something else this morning, I notice some guy makes a comment, some jerk makes a comment, and the comment is that I’ve damaged my credibility irreparably by making the typo. Now, my friends, the typo was, I was missing an apostrophe. I missed an apostrophe. It’s not like I completely blew a word. I missed an apostrophe. If that damages my credibility with you, honestly, you’re in the wrong place. Typos are free. They’re my gift to the world, all right? It’s just a little something extra I throw in there.

Seriously. If that type of thing, if a little mistake, if a typo is going to do that much damage to my credibility in your eyes, then you’re not familiar with my body of work. You haven’t spent any time really getting to know me. We don’t have a relationship. You need to just move on and get your sales and business strategy and marketing fulfillment somewhere else, because I’m not your guy. My point, people, is, the small stuff is unimportant. Don’t sweat the small stuff. Typos, sure, do your best to avoid them, but are you going to spend an hour and a half proofreading a piece that took you 20 minutes to write? No. You’re not going to do that. Don’t sweat the small stuff. The people who take shots at you are demonstrating their own emotional baggage. They’re putting their own emotional baggage on display. You can’t be concerned about that. You’ve got to live your life. You’ve got to move on. When somebody takes a shot at something like that, something as insignificant as a typo, you’ve got to let it go. Just let it go and move on. It’s about them. It’s not about you.

Now, to that point, and getting closer, getting more on our topic for today, I want to talk about the big debate that was Monday night. If you’re time shifting, and you’re listening to this months later, we are two days after the first presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. If you’re listening to this months down the road, I wish I was there now to figure out what’s going to happen with this election, because it is absolutely crazy. Nancy, did you happen to catch any of that debate two nights ago?

I watched all of it.

Did you watch all of it? What stuck out for you in the debate? What resonated with you? Not necessarily an issue that got you fired up, but just the overall ambiance, the experience of this debate. What stood out for you?

Overall, I think it was just the difference in their demeanor, and how they presented themselves. I feel like Trump was very defensive but aggressive, and then Hillary was just so calm and, like she had been doing this for years.

I agree with you. I found the same thing. These are two of the most distrusted, according to the polls, they’re two of the most distrusted candidates in history. They routinely, throughout the course of the evening, one or the other was calling on the other person to be fact checked. They were calling the other person out essentially as a liar, right there on national television, in front of everyone. I’m watching the debate, and I’m Tweeting, and I’m texting with friends, and at one point, it was late in the debate, and at one point Trump gave an answer that was just a word salad. It was just a mish-mosh of things that he said that, to me, they were disjointed and they really made no sense. I sent that to a friend, I texted it to a friend, and his text back was one word. It was a one line sentence. His sentence was, “Salesman.”

Now, that hit home with me. That really hit home with me, because I sell every day. We all sell. When we have ideas, we have to sell our ideas to other people, so I’m thinking to myself, “At least in the eyes of this guy, my friend, my profession, what I do, is basically throw nonsensical crap against the wall and see what sticks?” No. That’s not true. That’s not what I do. I help people. I convince people to take steps, to do things that are good for them. If I didn’t think what I was doing was good for someone, I wouldn’t be doing it. Selling is helping, and in order to use our system, the 60 Second Sale System, is all about building relationships. It’s about us creating something together to last a lifetime. If I throw a word salad at you just to confuse you and get you to do what I want you to do, that’s going to damage our relationship. That’s not going to help our relationship.

Today, when we talk about how to be a good liar, we’re not talking about what to do and how to do it so that you can confuse someone, so that you can conceal the truth. What we’re talking about is essentially helping to build our own self-esteem, helping to bolster our courage, so that we can go out there and do what we need to do every day, and put on that rejection armor, so that we don’t get hurt by everybody else throwing their baggage at us. Let me give you the three things, the three instances when I think you need to be a good liar. Now, you may disagree with me, and if you disagree with me, I want to hear from you. I want to hear all about that. If you’re on Facebook with us live right now, type in why you disagree with me right on the screen. If you’re not on Facebook, and you want to be, @TheDaveLorenzo. Twitter, it’s the same thing. Instagram, the same thing. TheDaveLorenzo.

Three times when you should be a great liar. Number one, to yourself. You’ve got to lie to yourself. You get up in the morning, you look in the mirror, and you don’t feel like you’re your best. You look in the mirror and you tell yourself, “You are beautiful. You are fantastic. You are the most valuable person in the world to someone, and that someone is the next person you’re going to meet. You’re going to add value to their lives, because you are the most valuable person in the world to them.” You may not feel that way, and honestly, you may not look that way to anybody else, but you have to look that way to yourself. You wake up in the morning, your hair is a mess. Maybe you’ve got … If you look like me, you’ve got bags under your eyes. Maybe you’re not feeling as good as you should, but you’ve got to tell yourself that you’re the best, and that you’re going to go out there and you’re going to add value to the lives of other people.

The beauty of a lie is, if you repeat it enough, people believe it to be true. When you lie to yourself, that’s called positive self-talk. You feel, perhaps, maybe you’re 10 pounds or 20 pounds overweight. You feel like you’re not at your fighting best. You feel like you’re not fit. You feel a little slumped over, and perhaps a little afraid to face the day. You’ve got to look at yourself, and get yourself motivated, and that requires you convincing yourself, and it starts with that little lie you tell yourself. That’s the first time you have to be a great liar. First time is to yourself.

Now, the second time you have to be a great liar is when you lie to the people you care about the most. Now, I’m not saying that you need to go out and lie to your spouse, to your significant other, about where you were last night. That’s not what I’m telling you to do. When your significant other, when your spouse comes to you, when my wife comes to me … I hope you’re not watching this on Facebook right now. When my wife comes to me, and she says, “Do I look fat in this?” If the answer is yes, there is no way I am telling her the truth. You can’t do that either. That is not the time for brutal honesty. That is not the time for brutal honesty. There is a better way to help your spouse, to help your significant other, think about their health, and think about their fitness. There’s a better way to frame that conversation.

You have to be a great liar when it’s time for you to tell someone the answer they want to hear in that specific instance. The people you care about the most need you to bolster their self-esteem. That’s what we do for each other. When you care about someone, that’s what you do for them. If you want to help them, if you want to help them with their life, if you want to help them with a specific problem, you need to frame it in the right way. If, perhaps, you want to have that discussion with your spouse or with your significant other, I don’t need to have that with my wife. She’s perfect exactly the way she is, but if you want to have that with your spouse, with your significant other, what you do is you wait for the right opportunity, you go up to your spouse, your significant other, and you talk about how you need to focus on your fitness and health. It would be easier if the two of you did it together. That’s the proper way to frame that discussion, so when she, or he, asks you, “Do I look fat in this? How do you think I did with that performance?”

Your kids, they do a dance recital. “How did I do, dad? How did I do, mom?” “You did fantastic. You were amazing. I’m so proud of you.” Regardless of whether they missed a step. Regardless of whether they left out the whole stanza in their piano concerto. You don’t need to tell them the truth. You need to tell them something that’s going to bolster their self-esteem.

The third time, the last time we’re going to discuss when it’s okay to lie, when it’s absolutely okay to lie, is when the longer discussion would not be productive. When the longer discussion would not be productive. Here’s an example. You work with a client. You have a catastrophic service failure. You let your client down. Your client comes to you and they say, “You let me down. Why did that happen? I need to know. I just can not believe that you let me down like this. We’ve worked together for 20 years.” The reason that you let that client down in this instance is because one of your key people didn’t show up for work, because they have a drinking problem, and they overslept, and they slept through their alarm clock. This is the fifth time it’s happened. You’re going to let that employee go.

Now, if you were to have that discussion with your client, it would not be productive. That discussion with your client would not be productive. What do you do? You simply say to your client, “Mr. Client, I accept full responsibility. I accept full responsibility. I am going to tell you that the reason we let you down was completely my fault. I should have put a system in place to make sure this didn’t happen. I promise it will never happen again if you give us another chance.” You didn’t actually lie. You just didn’t tell him the full truth, and if he insists on hearing the truth, you simply say to him, “This is not something that I will share with you. It’s a personal issue that I’ve addressed with our team, and I can assure you this will never happen again.”

It’s not really a full lie, but it’s not disclosing the whole truth to the client, because, honestly, someone’s issue, someone’s disease, someone’s personal status is not the business of the client. The service failure is, and if you can assure the client that you will prevent that service failure from occurring again in the future, he doesn’t really need to get into the details. He doesn’t need the gory details.

Those are the three times when it’s okay to lie. Now, I’ll tell you directly, frankly, it is never, ever okay to lie to deceive a client, to achieve your own end. To achieve an end that’s going to benefit you. It’s never okay to lie to deceive anyone to intentionally hurt them. That is never okay. In these three specific instances, I think it’s okay to lie, and I think you need to be a good liar. How do you become a good liar in these three instances? Quite frankly, you use as much of the truth as you possibly can. That’s one. Number two, you provide as many details that are accurate as you possibly can. Number three, you change the subject, not immediately so that it looks suspicious, but gently move on to another subject.

“Honey, do I look fat in this?” “Oh, my love, you look beautiful. I can’t wait for everyone to see us together at the event. Do you know what time it starts? In fact, we should get going, right?” That’s how you do it. The client says to you, “You let me down. I can’t believe you let me down. This is horrible. So horrible, service failure. How could you let this happen? Why did it happen?” “Mr. Client, I’m very sorry that this happened. I accept full responsibility. This is on me. I promise you this will not happen again. We’ve put systems in place to ensure this won’t happen again. Let me know what I can do to make it up to you. What can I do to make this up to you?” Asking a question is a great way to pivot from a subject that’s uncomfortable, where you just had to either not tell part of the truth or move on to another area.

The title of this show is How to Be a Good Liar. I’ve given you three times when I think it’s okay, in fact, it’s your obligation to lie. You tell me what you think. Hit me up on Twitter, @TheDaveLorenzo. On Facebook, @TheDaveLorenzo. You can also find me on Instagram, @TheDaveLorenzo. I absolutely love Instagram. I hope that you will join me on Instagram as well. Now, we’ve got a question, Nancy, and I know that this is one of the questions that came to me on Twitter. I’m going to read it to you. Let’s turn the tables today. I’ll read the question to you, and you tell me if it’s a good question. You tell me if you think I should answer it, okay?

Okay.

This question today is from Todd Murgo in El Paso, Texas. I’m looking at it right here, right now. He says, “Dave, you talk about sending referral sources business before asking them to refer you. You always say that’s how you create evangelists. Well, there’s one guy I’ve sent three different deals to, and he hasn’t sent me anything back yet. How many more deals should I send him before I move on to someone else?” What do you think, Nancy?

That’s a tricky situation to be in. You wonder, you keep doing things for people, and they’re not doing things in return for you, and you have to wonder if you should continue.

You know, this is something that comes up all the time. I hear it from a lot of different people. My own personal feeling is that you give someone three chances, and Todd’s exactly right. You give them three chances, and then you move on. In fact, when we talk about creating evangelists, the best way to create an evangelist is to send them a referral. Let me, because I think we’ve talked about this before, let me give you the step by step guide to preventing this situation from happening. Todd, if you’re listening, this is kind of a bonus for you, because I think we’ve covered this question before.

Here’s what you do. To avoid this situation, to keep it from happening in the first place, you demonstrate to your client how you want to be referred. “Nancy, I want to connect you with somebody who’s going to be a fantastic client for you.” There’s three ways I could do it. First way I could do it is, I could say, “Listen. I need you to meet Nancy Pop. She’s fantastic. She will absolutely help you take your business to the next level.” Then, I do an e-mail introduction. I connect you with the client. That’s an e-mail introduction, and basically, Nancy, for you, what I’m doing is I’m inviting you to make a cold call to this person. Not very comfortable for you, but it’s better than you calling somebody out of the blue, I guess, because I’ve kind of warmed them up a little. Maybe it’s a lukewarm call, and not a cold call, right?

The second way to do this would be for me to pick up the phone, and for me to say, “Hey, Nancy. Hold on. I’ve got Jim on the other line. You got a minute to talk to him? Okay. Let me get Jim and connect him to you. Jim’s a guy who’s looking for the exact services you provide. I’m going to introduce you to him, and I’m going to talk you up. I’m going to tell him what a great job you do. Hold on one second.” Then I patch Jim in, and I say, “Jim. I want you to meet Nancy. She’s on the line.” Nancy says hello, and I say, “Hey, Jim. Nancy helps me with my show. She produces it. She’s fantastic. She really keeps things organized. I think she could do the same for you. I really think you guys should work together.” Then Jim says, “Great.” Maybe he asks Nancy a question or two. They exchange contact information, and you’re off to the races. You guys can do business together then.

That’s the way you do it over the phone, and in my case with Nancy, most of the time, Nancy’s in New York. I’m in Miami, so that will probably work the best. Let’s say I had somebody really, really big. Let’s say I had Oprah, and Oprah’s doing a new show. She’s going to do a new show on her own network, which is called OWN. She’s going to do her own show, and she calls me, and she says, “Dave. I need a producer for this show.” I say, “Oprah. I’ve got the perfect person. Her name is Nancy Pop. You and I, let’s get on a plane. We’re going to go meet Nancy.” I call Nancy, we set an appointment, I drag Oprah into Nancy’s office. We talk. They hit it off. The trust that I have in Nancy is personally passed to Oprah, because we’re all together, the three of us, in one room. I took the time to go pick Oprah up in Chicago on my plane and take her to New York.

Now, I’m exaggerating, obviously, but if you really want to make sure two people do business, you want to be absolutely positive that you communicate the trust you have in that other person. You grab them by the ear. You take them to the meeting, and you introduce them. You guys shake hands, and you say, “I trust this person so much I was willing to take time out of my day to introduce them to you.” Now, back to the question that Todd asked. If you really want to be sure people know how to refer you, this is the way you refer them. If you want your referrals in person, you give your referrals in person. Teach people through your actions. If you want your referrals over the phone, do it over the phone. If you’re okay with the invitation to the cold call in an e-mail, then take the invitation to the cold call in the e-mail. Your actions are how you demonstrate to people that you want to be referred in a specific way. That’s how you do it. This question is so important. It’s so nice that I think we had to cover it twice. Thanks, Todd, for the question. I appreciate it.

Now, we’re at the end of our show. We’re at the end of our time together, and Nancy, guess what? We’ve got something special today.

What is it?

You may have noticed on the way in, we had brand new intro music, and on the way out, we’ve got brand new music, too. Sit back and relax for the next 31 seconds and listen to our great exit music. Until next time, I’m Dave Lorenzo, and I hope you make a great living and live a great life.

Here is the behind the scenes video from Facebook Live in the studio when we recorded this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show.

How to Be a Good Liar

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How To Be A Good Liar Lying is bad when you do it to hurt someone else.  But there are three specific occasions when it is perfectly acceptable to lie. That's the topic of discussion today on the 60 Second Sales Show. How To Be A Good Liar<br /> <br /> Lying is bad when you do it to hurt someone else.  But there are three specific occasions when it is perfectly acceptable to lie. That's the topic of discussion today on the 60 Second Sales Show.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript from this show:<br /> <br /> Hi there, everyone. Welcome to another edition of The 60 Second Sale Show. I'm Dave Lorenzo, and here with us we have our fantastic and talented producer, Nancy Pop. Good morning, Nancy. How are you today?<br /> <br /> Good morning. I'm doing great. How about you?<br /> <br /> I am absolutely fantastic. Today we have a great topic we're going to talk about. The topic is how to be a good liar. Now, Nancy, I know you are a fabulous and virtuous person, but have you ever had occasion to tell someone a lie? Even just a little white lie, like a little fib?<br /> <br /> Of course. It's only natural.<br /> <br /> It's only natural. Of course. Now, when, for example, would you tell someone something that wasn't true?<br /> <br /> I think the first instance that comes to mind is when maybe you're running late to work or something, because you slept in, and you're embarrassed to just admit that you slept in. Something small like that.<br /> <br /> Right. You're embarrassed. It's kind of a face saving move. It's like a self-preservation move. That's one of the times when all of us have, in the past, every one of us, have told a lie. We've told something that wasn't true. We're going to get into the three times when we tell lies. The three most frequent times when we tell lies. We're going to talk about why we do it, and we're going to talk about how to do it in a way that is not going to do damage to someone else. Really, in the end, when it comes to lying, and this is such an explosive topic. When it comes to lying, the reason that we teach our kids not to lie, the reason that we're told not to lie, is because we're afraid we're going to do harm to someone else.<br /> <br /> If it weren't to do harm to anyone, would it be okay to lie? Don't answer that. We're going to get to that in just a moment. Before we do, I want to cover just a couple of things that are going on today that have made this topic kind of top of mind for me, and a couple of other things that I've noticed that really have gotten under my skin. Everybody seems to like it, Nancy, when I kind of use this as a cathartic experience. I use this platform. I use the 60 Second Sale Show as a cathartic experience to kind of clear the air and make myself feel better. I'll tell you, frankly, it's cheaper than therapy, and I don't mind doing it.<br /> <br /> Today, one of the things that I am absolutely livid about is, I posted something on Instagram. Those of you who follow me on Instagram, @TheDaveLorenzo, I posted one of these pithy quotes. I used to quote other people. Now, I just quote myself. It's fun, and nobody can dispute the source, right? I quote myself, and yesterday, I quoted myself, and in the quote, I made a typo. It was a typo. Not a big deal. Quite frankly, I make a lot of typos. I write really quickly. If you go to DaveLorenzo.com, that site has been up for, like, three months. I've got 105 articles on there already. I write a lot, and when you write as quickly as I do, you're going to make mistakes.<br /> <br /> I get out of the shower yesterday. Something comes to mind. I put up a little pithy quote. I drop it in there, and I post it. 26, 27 people like it in the first 10 minutes. I don't pay any attention to it. This morning, I go to post something else, or I posted a video last night after that. I go to post something else this morning, I notice some guy makes a comment, some jerk makes a comment, and the comment is that I've damaged my credibility irreparably by making the typo. Now, my friends, the typo was, I was missing an apostrophe. I missed an apostrophe. It's not like I completely blew a word. I missed an apostrophe. If that damages my credibility with you, Dave Lorenzo clean 25:26
Forget Me Not: How To Be Memorable https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/26/how-to-be-memorable/ Mon, 26 Sep 2016 16:00:13 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=703 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/26/how-to-be-memorable/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/26/how-to-be-memorable/feed/ 0 You must learn how to be memorable. People want to do business with you forever.  They know you. They like you. They trust you. However, they have forgotten about you. You must correct this. That is the focus of this week's 60 Second Sales Show. Here is a transcript of this show: How to Be Memorable Hi there everyone and welcome to the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo and today's episode is titled Forget Me Not or How To Be Memorable. The reason we titled it that is because most sales professionals, most business leaders actually don't take advantage of their greatest asset and that asset is their list of contacts. That's right. Your list of prospects. Your list of clients and your list of evangelists. That's where eighty percent of your new business should come from and you're not taking advantage of that right now. We're going to help you take advantage today on the 60 Second Sale Show. Those of you who are just joining us or joining us for the first time, we started a couple of weeks ago broadcasting the recording of the 60 Second Sale Show live on Facebook. We do that every Wednesday. You can go to Facebook at thedavelorenzo, thedavelorenzo, the word T-H-E-D-A-V-E-L-O-R-E-N-Z-O all run together. Watch us record the show. Watch behind the scenes. Jump into the sausage factory and watch the sausage being made. Or if you prefer, you can listen to the podcast as it's recorded all edited and pretty on Mondays. The podcast new episodes come out Monday at noon. The Facebook live show is done every Wednesday at nine thirty or as close as we can get. I want to introduce you to our wonderful and talented producer, the person who makes everything happen behind the scenes. Her name is Nancy Popp. Good morning Nancy. How are you doing today? Good morning. I'm doing great. How about yourself? I'm doing absolutely fantastic Nancy. I'm excited about quite a few things this week. You know what, I want to hear what you're excited about. Tell me something good Nancy. I'm just excited for being in New York right now. It's a great time you know. The weather's really nice. The changes. The fall. I'm excited for the fall. Fall is probably the best time of year in New York. The weather's getting a little bit cooler. The city kicks into high gear with baseball playoffs which are coming up. I know Nancy here is super excited about that. You've also got football season that just started. I mean, what could be better then spending fall in New York? I'm with you. I would be super excited about that if I was there too. You know, a couple things I'm excited about this week. First I have to tell you, my son, we are huge baseball fanatics as you could tell from one of the things I said I would be excited about from being in New York. My son is starting to get some big hits in baseball games. He drove in the tieing and go ahead run in his game last week. He's seven years old and his hitting is really coming on strong. I'm super excited about that. I'm also really excited, those of you who join me on Instagram at thedavelorenzo on Instagram, really everything you need to know about me for social medical just type in the word thedavelorenzo and you'll find me. It you're with me on Instagram you've noticed that I'm doing push ups every day. Some of you may be familiar with this. This is, the hashtag is 22kill, K-I-L-L, and it's the push up challenge. I was challenged by my friend Doug Comet weeks ago, a couple weeks ago, to do twenty push ups a day. The reason we're doing them is to support our troops and to honor the brave men and women who return from serving our country and they have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. You see on average twenty-two people, twenty-two people each day, twenty-two returning veterans commit suicide due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This viral activity, doing twenty-two push ups a day to honor our troops has generated a huge amount of awareness. If you go to Instagram look at any of the videos wher... You must learn how to be memorable. People want to do business with you forever.  They know you. They like you. They trust you. However, they have forgotten about you. You must correct this.

That is the focus of this week’s 60 Second Sales Show.

Here is a transcript of this show:

How to Be Memorable

Hi there everyone and welcome to the 60 Second Sale Show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo and today’s episode is titled Forget Me Not or How To Be Memorable. The reason we titled it that is because most sales professionals, most business leaders actually don’t take advantage of their greatest asset and that asset is their list of contacts. That’s right. Your list of prospects. Your list of clients and your list of evangelists. That’s where eighty percent of your new business should come from and you’re not taking advantage of that right now. We’re going to help you take advantage today on the 60 Second Sale Show.

Those of you who are just joining us or joining us for the first time, we started a couple of weeks ago broadcasting the recording of the 60 Second Sale Show live on Facebook. We do that every Wednesday. You can go to Facebook at thedavelorenzo, thedavelorenzo, the word T-H-E-D-A-V-E-L-O-R-E-N-Z-O all run together. Watch us record the show. Watch behind the scenes. Jump into the sausage factory and watch the sausage being made. Or if you prefer, you can listen to the podcast as it’s recorded all edited and pretty on Mondays. The podcast new episodes come out Monday at noon. The Facebook live show is done every Wednesday at nine thirty or as close as we can get.

I want to introduce you to our wonderful and talented producer, the person who makes everything happen behind the scenes. Her name is Nancy Popp. Good morning Nancy. How are you doing today?

Good morning. I’m doing great. How about yourself?

I’m doing absolutely fantastic Nancy. I’m excited about quite a few things this week. You know what, I want to hear what you’re excited about. Tell me something good Nancy.

I’m just excited for being in New York right now. It’s a great time you know. The weather’s really nice. The changes. The fall. I’m excited for the fall.

Fall is probably the best time of year in New York. The weather’s getting a little bit cooler. The city kicks into high gear with baseball playoffs which are coming up. I know Nancy here is super excited about that. You’ve also got football season that just started. I mean, what could be better then spending fall in New York? I’m with you. I would be super excited about that if I was there too. You know, a couple things I’m excited about this week. First I have to tell you, my son, we are huge baseball fanatics as you could tell from one of the things I said I would be excited about from being in New York.

My son is starting to get some big hits in baseball games. He drove in the tieing and go ahead run in his game last week. He’s seven years old and his hitting is really coming on strong. I’m super excited about that. I’m also really excited, those of you who join me on Instagram at thedavelorenzo on Instagram, really everything you need to know about me for social medical just type in the word thedavelorenzo and you’ll find me. It you’re with me on Instagram you’ve noticed that I’m doing push ups every day. Some of you may be familiar with this. This is, the hashtag is 22kill, K-I-L-L, and it’s the push up challenge.

I was challenged by my friend Doug Comet weeks ago, a couple weeks ago, to do twenty push ups a day. The reason we’re doing them is to support our troops and to honor the brave men and women who return from serving our country and they have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. You see on average twenty-two people, twenty-two people each day, twenty-two returning veterans commit suicide due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This viral activity, doing twenty-two push ups a day to honor our troops has generated a huge amount of awareness. If you go to Instagram look at any of the videos where you see me doing push-ups-there’s a website in there. There’s a link to a website that’s in there where you can go and donate and support the cause.

This started about a hear and a half ago. Believe it or not, this has generated so much awareness the average has actually come down over the course of the year from twenty-two a day as far as I understand from people who’ve commented on my Instagram page to less than twenty a day. Now one member of our armed forces committing suicide due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder each day is too much so we’re going to keep working to generate awareness for the cause.

The reason I’m excited is not just because I feel like I’m supporting our troops and I’m doing something good but also, Nancy, you’re never going to believe this. I’m losing my man boobs. I had probably like, yeah, I had probably like an A cup at the point where I started and now I’m two weeks in and my chest is actually flattening out. I’m also running a little bit, which I think helps as well but people are making less fun of me and I feel a lot better about myself. That’s another reason for me to be super excited this week.

I’m proud of you Dave.

Thank you so much. Let me tell you, when, the next time you see me when you see how fit I am you’re going to be even more proud. Today the main reason why I’m excited to be with you all is because I’m going to give you something that you can use immediately. You can jump on this right now. It’ll fill a big hole in your business and it’s going to generate more income for you as a business leader or sales professional.

This strategy that I’m going to teach you right now is something that I was completely and totally remiss. I wasn’t doing this. I was about a year and a half into my own business. I had been successful other places. You guys know all those stories and if you don’t know them, go back to the previous podcasts. You can hear all my stories about places I’ve worked. I had been successful in other businesses and I was missing out on something. It was pointed out to me and it changed my business life forever.

Here’s the thing. We meet people all the time at networking events or you’ll do some speaking and you’ll meet people at a speaking engagement. Maybe dozens or hundreds of people. You’ll write an article and people will reply telling you how great the article was or they’ll comment and tell you how fantastic they thought your writing, they think your writing is. You don’t capitalize on that in any way except to say thank your to shake their hand or to accept the pat on the back and go about your business.

Well, that’s a missed opportunity. So too is the missed opportunity from the client that you took great care of last year. That you sold that big engagement to. That you sold that large order to. Then just moved on and forgot about it. You didn’t stay in touch with them. Missed opportunity. Here’s how you’re going to capitalize on that opportunity. You have to go back and think to yourself there’s one thing. There’s one thing your clients give you before they ever give you their money and that one thing is they give you their trust. They give you their trust.

That’s the thing that carries through after the money is long gone. That client that you’ve taken extra special care of. Those folks who you dazzled in your speaking engagement. The people that you meet and you connect with at a networking event. Those folks now, they know you and they trust you. Hopefully they like you as well. But you’re not able to capitalize on it beyond the point where you had that initial contact or where you closed that first deal.

Here’s how you can capitalize on it. There are three opportunities for you to connect with and stay in touch with these people. Think about this for a moment. Think about the most precious, the most treasured relationship in your life. Maybe you have someone who’s a significant other to you. A spouse or a boyfriend or a girlfriend. Or maybe it’s just a family member, a brother or a sister or just a friend who’s so important to you. Think about how frequently you’re in contact with them. How frequently you interact with them.

Now, I know with my spouse, I talk to my spouse, my wife, multiple times a day. Carrie and I constantly talk from the minute we get up until the minute we go to sleep. In fact, my home office, the studio that I’m in right now, is in my home and I’ll walk out of the studio after I’m done recording this episode of the 60 Second Sale Show and Carrie will be right out there and we’ll have a conversation. We talk dozens and dozens of times each day. You, with the people who are special to you or important to you in your life, you probably communicate with them multiple times each day.

Now let me ask you, would your relationship with them get better if you stopped communicating with them? Let’s say you talked to them today and then you didn’t talk to them for, oh, I don’t know, six months or a year. I know my relationship with Carrie would be, it would be a disaster. If I didn’t talk to her for six months or a year she would stalk me and eventually she would track me down and really be angry and that would not be a pretty sight for me or for anybody around us.

Relationships are built on a foundation of trust and frequency of communication increases trust. Let me say that again because it’s really really important. Frequency of communication increases trust. Think about that client to whom you sold a huge order just a year ago. Sold the order. You probably took everybody in the office out for drinks. You got a lot of pats on the back. Maybe you even won some sort of award or you used your commission or the money that you took home after the sale to buy something really nice for yourself. All of that’s fantastic. Then what happened?

You forgot about that person for a year. A whole year went by. Now it’s time for you to make your quota or you need a little extra money and you’re looking around for that extra money. You’re thinking to yourself, “I got to go sell somebody brand new. How am I going to do this?” You don’t have to sell somebody brand new. There’s somebody out there who already trusts you who probably has a need for an additional product or an additional service but you just forgot about them.

All right. Here’s how you’re going to stay in touch with them. The first thing I want you to do, so I want you to think about how you can stay in touch with these folks on an annual basis. Once a year how can you stay in touch with these folks? Some companies have a holiday party each year and they connect with their customers during the holidays. The customers come over. Food and beverages. Maybe a little entertainment. Everybody has a good time. There’s the spirit of good cheer in the air. Fantastic, right?

I would encourage you in addition to the holiday party or instead of the holiday party to pick your slowest time of the year and do a client appreciation event. Invite your clients over to your office. If you’re an independent sales professional or you’re a sales professional at a big company you can find a place to have a party to invite your clients. Whether you have ten or twenty or thirty or a thousand. Invite them over. Have some drinks. Give a little talk saying how much you appreciate them and thanking them. Don’t pitch them on any business. Let them introduce themselves to one another or better yet you introduce them to one another so they can do business with each other. Connect with them at least once a year in person to show your appreciation. Even if they haven’t done business with you in years, invite them to that annual event.

Now the second opportunity you have to connect with these folks is on a monthly basis. There are a couple of things you can do on a monthly basis to stay connected with your clients, with your evangelists, with people who are out there promoting your services and with the folks who are just really really engaged dedicated people to you and your company. People who’re your highest level prospects.

Each month you have an opportunity to wish someone well for a specific holiday. I encourage you to send out a holiday card each month. Now, so you don’t think this is an idea that’s brand new to me I’m going to tell you that I stole it from a guy named Joe Girard. Joe Girard is known as, in the Guinness Book of Records, the greatest salesman of all time. He was a car salesman and he pioneered this strategy. Here’s what Joe did. Each month he would send out a card to his past clients. The card would have some sort of a picture on it and it would just have a handwritten note from him inside that said, “I like you. Joe Gerard.” It would be personalized at the top.

Now you don’t have to do that. What you can do is you can wish them well for a holiday each month and I’ll give you an example. Obviously you know the holidays like Thanksgiving. Send out a Thanksgiving card in November and a holiday card in December. Well in January there’s New Year’s so you can wish people a Happy New Year. Send it out the second week of January when people are all done receiving their cards. In February, my favorite holiday is Ground Hog Day. You can send out a card with a cute little ground hog poking his head out of the hole and it can say inside, the inscription could say something like, “I hope you don’t see your shadow. Here’s to an early spring. Hopefully your business is springing up with more profit for you. Give me a call if I can ever be of help.” Sign your name and you’re done. That’s February.

March, there’s the luck of the Irish. St. Patty’s Day is in March. You can send out a card with a four leaf clover on it and say, “You don’t need the luck of the Irish to help you with your business. I’m here to do that.” And put your name on it. You get the idea. In April, April showers or spring rebirth, renewal. May is Memorial Day so you can honor our troops with a card and send it out to your clients, your evangelists and to your prospects. In June there’s Flag Day or the beginning of summer. Grass is on the field, let’s play baseball. That type of things.

July, declare your independence. August is the dog days of summer. Don’t let the dog days of summer get you down. September, back to school. Everybody loves back to school. October, obviously Halloween and then November we started this whole thing off with Thanksgiving. Every month there’s your opportunity to stay in front of your clients with a holiday card. I’ll tell you the strategy works regardless of whether you’re in business to business sales or business to consumer sales. Everybody appreciates the recognition.

Okay. Now, if you want to stay in touch with people on a frequent basis and generate tons of business, here’s the strategy that knocks the ball out of the park. This is the home run right now. Weekly emails. Write about a topic that’s in the news. Write about a book that you read or a movie that you’ve seen. Write about events that are going on in the community. Do some educational pieces from time to time. Vary your topics each week and send out a weekly email newsletter to everyone on your list.

Not everyone will read it. Only twenty percent of the folks will read it. But those twenty percent are the most important to you because they’re the most engaged people on your list. They’re the people you want to connect with the most. They’re the people who are the most valuable to you. They are most likely to refer business to you. They are most likely to do business with you again. You stay top of mind with them and you will reap the benefits.

Now I know what you’re thinking. Dave, that’s a lot of work. An email newsletter once a week. Well, it only has to be about three hundred or four hundred or maybe five hundred words. You can dictate it into a transcription software and have it transcribed and sent out if you want. It couldn’t be any easier. You can speak five hundred words in ten minutes. It’s so easy. Just talk about what’s on the top of your mind. Write about something that’s going om in the community. Do a book review, a movie review, and occasionally educate your clients and just remind them that they have someone in their family who does what you do and this will result in a ton of business for you.

My clients who do this, who do the weekly newsletter strategy, weekly email newsletter strategy on average get eighty percent of their business off their weekly email newsletter list. That’s phenomenal. Eighty percent of their business. Imagine right now you’re not doing this and you can up your business by eighty percent. Who wouldn’t sign up for that? My friends, you are crazy if you don’t do this. I’m going to recap these strategies for you again because they’re so important. They’re so powerful.

Number one, the annual event. We call it a client appreciation event. Do it during your slowest time of year. You can invite people into your office. Bring in some food, some drinks, some entertainment. You can do it in a restaurant. Be as big or as reserved as you want but recognize people once a year.

Second strategy, monthly. Send them a monthly card. Phenomenal. Huge impact. Monthly cards. You can automate that whole process. You can go to any print shop and they will automate the process for you. They’ll do the printing and mailing. You can go online to a service like SendOutCards. SendOutCards will automate it for you. Just Google automated card delivery services and you’ll be amazed at the people who are out there who will take this over for you and you can put it on autopilot.

Finally your weekly email newsletter. You can use a service like MailChimp, Constant Contact, Icontact, GetResponse, any of these services. Put the newsletters in. Format them. Send them one day a week. Same day, same time. The business will come rolling in. You have a hole right now in your business. This strategy will help you plug that hole. It’s powerful. It’s phenomenal. Do it and reap the benefits today. This is probably the one strategy I tell everyone, if you can only implement one strategy in your business this would be it.

My email newsletter list for me is gold. It’s absolute gold. I never miss a week. Every Wednesday at noon my email newsletter goes out and every Wednesday afternoon the money comes rolling in. All right, speaking of money rolling in, we talk about a business topic each and every single week so that I can help you make even more money rolling in. Today I think Nancy has a question that she was able to source for us. So Nancy, tell me about the question that you have for us this week.

All rightly. My good friend Nate, he just graduated from NYU Business School. He wanted to know, he said, “Business is oftentimes a male dominated industry. As society continues to change what is the best way for both women and men to open up the field and achieve gender equality? Can we achieve gender equality in business?”

All right. Well thanks Nancy and thank you Nate for that question. Congratulations on graduating from NYU. It’s a great question. You know, one of the things that is hot in the news right now because we’re in the middle of the election season is gender equality. We have a candidate running for President on the Democratic side. She’s the first woman candidate ever and Hillary Clinton. On the Republican side we have Donald Trump. This is, the gender question is one that is thrust to the fore front because of this.

Here’s something that’s interesting about what we’re seeing in the political climate now. What we’re seeing in the political climate now is people are talking about the person who’s best qualified. Best qualified to be President. They’re talking about that because of the credentials I think of Hillary Clinton and also because of Donald Trump’s credentials. Donald Trump comes from the business world. He’s got no experience in politics or foreign affairs. Hillary Clinton has spent her entire career in politics and spent the last six years prior to running for President after taking a year off, spent six years prior to that as Secretary of State working on foreign affairs.

There’s a question as to who’s better qualified and there are great arguments being made on both sides. I see this as something that’s analogous to business right now. I think in this day and age there’s still some bias toward men and we see that in pay. Any time you do a pay survey you see that women are, for whatever reason, compensated at a lower level than men. However, things are changing. Things are improving. I think part of this is because women historically have been raised to be less promotional. They don’t promote themselves as well as men do.

There are a lot of women out there who feel like it’s not their place to talk about their skills or to brag about their accomplishments. I think that’s just wrong. I think women are, women need to promote their skills as well as men and they need to brag about their accomplishments as well as men and I think we need to embrace the fact that if you don’t talk about your accomplishments, nobody will ever know about them. Now society will have to catch up. Society will have to adjust. Men who brag are known as promotional and women who brag are known as pushy.

I don’t think you need to worry about that any longer. I think if you’re going to be labeled as pushy as a woman, your going to be labeled as pushy regardless of whether you brag or not so you need to brag. You need to talk about your accomplishments. You need to force the issue of pay. Now, for the business world’s part, businesses need to do a better job of recognizing that talent comes in all different shapes, sizes, colors and genders and the business world needs to be more sensitive to the fact that women can be just as good if not better executives, chief executives as men.

You see it now all over the place. You see women executives who are super successful. Sheryl Sandberg at Facebook is one of them. There are women everywhere right now who are forcing this issue to the forefront but they shouldn’t have to. They really shouldn’t have to. In terms of Nate’s question, will we ever achieve gender equality? I think as women are thrust into the forefront in more prominent roles, I think you’re going to start to see more and more women embracing these roles and some of the stereotypes that women are subjected to will begin to break down.

Certainly the gender barrier being shattered with a major party having a women nominee for the first time. I think that’s fantastic and I think as we get into presidential debates you’re going to start to see people evaluate these two candidates based on their own qualifications and gender is not going to be an issue at all. If it is an issue it’ll be an issue for a minority of people rather than for a majority of people.

Nate, very directly, I think it’s a long road but i think we’re making some progress. I think the responsibility is on the business world to recognize that talent comes in all different shapes, sizes, colors and genders. It’s also incumbent upon each of the candidates who are candidates for not only political office but candidates for promotion in business to be more assertive and to promote themselves without shame. Unabashedly promote themselves so that they can be recognized for their true talent.

Don’t play into the stereotype. Whether your a man or a woman, you have to promote yourself because if you don’t, no one will know how really good you are. Nate, thank you for the question. Nancy, thank you for sharing the question with us. This is the 60 Second Sale Show and my name is Dave Lorenzo. You can find us each week on iTunes. You can find us at davelorenzo.com and for the second time you can now find us on Facebook live. We do this show live each Wednesday at nine thirty or as close as we can get and the show is broadcast. It’s released on iTunes every Monday at noon.

Go back and listen to the past episodes and I welcome you here each and every single week. Until next week I’m Dave Lorenzo and I’m saying I hope you make a great living and live a great life.

Go behind the scenes of this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show. Follow the link below to the Facebook Live video recording from inside the studio behind the scenes when we recorded this episode.

How to Be Memorable: Behind the Scenes

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You must learn how to be memorable. People want to do business with you forever.  They know you. They like you. They trust you. However, they have forgotten about you. You must correct this. That is the focus of this week's 60 Second Sales Show. You must learn how to be memorable. People want to do business with you forever.  They know you. They like you. They trust you. However, they have forgotten about you. You must correct this.<br /> <br /> That is the focus of this week's 60 Second Sales Show.<br /> <br /> Here is a transcript of this show:<br /> How to Be Memorable<br /> Hi there everyone and welcome to the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo and today's episode is titled Forget Me Not or How To Be Memorable. The reason we titled it that is because most sales professionals, most business leaders actually don't take advantage of their greatest asset and that asset is their list of contacts. That's right. Your list of prospects. Your list of clients and your list of evangelists. That's where eighty percent of your new business should come from and you're not taking advantage of that right now. We're going to help you take advantage today on the 60 Second Sale Show.<br /> <br /> Those of you who are just joining us or joining us for the first time, we started a couple of weeks ago broadcasting the recording of the 60 Second Sale Show live on Facebook. We do that every Wednesday. You can go to Facebook at thedavelorenzo, thedavelorenzo, the word T-H-E-D-A-V-E-L-O-R-E-N-Z-O all run together. Watch us record the show. Watch behind the scenes. Jump into the sausage factory and watch the sausage being made. Or if you prefer, you can listen to the podcast as it's recorded all edited and pretty on Mondays. The podcast new episodes come out Monday at noon. The Facebook live show is done every Wednesday at nine thirty or as close as we can get.<br /> <br /> I want to introduce you to our wonderful and talented producer, the person who makes everything happen behind the scenes. Her name is Nancy Popp. Good morning Nancy. How are you doing today?<br /> <br /> Good morning. I'm doing great. How about yourself?<br /> <br /> I'm doing absolutely fantastic Nancy. I'm excited about quite a few things this week. You know what, I want to hear what you're excited about. Tell me something good Nancy.<br /> <br /> I'm just excited for being in New York right now. It's a great time you know. The weather's really nice. The changes. The fall. I'm excited for the fall.<br /> <br /> Fall is probably the best time of year in New York. The weather's getting a little bit cooler. The city kicks into high gear with baseball playoffs which are coming up. I know Nancy here is super excited about that. You've also got football season that just started. I mean, what could be better then spending fall in New York? I'm with you. I would be super excited about that if I was there too. You know, a couple things I'm excited about this week. First I have to tell you, my son, we are huge baseball fanatics as you could tell from one of the things I said I would be excited about from being in New York.<br /> <br /> My son is starting to get some big hits in baseball games. He drove in the tieing and go ahead run in his game last week. He's seven years old and his hitting is really coming on strong. I'm super excited about that. I'm also really excited, those of you who join me on Instagram at thedavelorenzo on Instagram, really everything you need to know about me for social medical just type in the word thedavelorenzo and you'll find me. It you're with me on Instagram you've noticed that I'm doing push ups every day. Some of you may be familiar with this. This is, the hashtag is 22kill, K-I-L-L, and it's the push up challenge.<br /> <br /> I was challenged by my friend Doug Comet weeks ago, a couple weeks ago, to do twenty push ups a day. The reason we're doing them is to support our troops and to honor the brave men and women who return from serving our country and they have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. You see on average twenty-two people, twenty-two people each day, twenty-two returning veterans commit suicide due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This viral activity, Dave Lorenzo clean 25:21
Four People I Will Never Forget https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/19/podcast-september-eleven-fifeteenth-anniversary/ Mon, 19 Sep 2016 16:00:16 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=671 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/19/podcast-september-eleven-fifeteenth-anniversary/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/19/podcast-september-eleven-fifeteenth-anniversary/feed/ 0 On this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show I share my September 11th story.  This was recorded on location, overlooking the 9/11 memorial, the day after the fifteenth anniversary of the attacks. Here is a transcript of this show: Welcome once again everyone to another edition of the Sixty Seconds Sales Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today's show is all about following up. Today's show is about your follow-up skills. It's about the most important thing, the absolutely most important thing in sales, in business and in life. Follow-up is critical to your success as an entrepreneur, as a business leader and as a sales professional. Before we get in a follow-up, I want to take a moment and recognize our fantastic producer, the lovely and talented Nancy Popp. Good morning Nancy. How are you today? Hey David. I'm doing good. How about you? I'm doing great. Nancy helps us with finding guests, she helps us with getting great questions every week and she helps us put the show together, so thank you Nancy for all that you do for us. We are today, talking about follow-up. Before we get into follow-up, I want to tell you about an unusual experience I had this week. We're recording this show today. We're recording it, it's just a couple of days after the 15th anniversary of September 11th, and this day in history, it's one of those days that for me that is surreal. Many of you who have followed me for awhile know that this day has some significance for me. I worked in Manhattan on September 11th, 2001. I ran a corporate housing company and we had three hundred employees, but in particular we had thirty that worked in Manhattan cleaning apartments. We had eight hundred apartments in Manhattan, and this crew of thirty people would clean all of our apartments, some of them once a week, some of them twice a month. On September 11th, 2001 I was in my office, and I had held our cleaning crew back because we had an awards ceremony. We were giving out the awards for the folks who had, we'd had a contest over the summer and we were giving out awards for the winners of the contest, we'd had a breakfast. Usually the housekeepers who worked with me in our offices at 518 5th Avenue, which is 5th Avenue and 43rd street, just two blocks from Grand Central Station, usually these fantastic men and women, the housekeepers that worked with us, would leave our office no later than 8am. Some days they would go to the Upper East Side, some days they would go to the Upper West Side, some days they would go downtown to work in the apartments that we managed. Well on September 11th, 2001, I held them back. They left our office at 8 o'clock, and a crew of twelve of them, it was ten housekeepers, a housekeeping trainee, and a housekeeping supervisor left our office at 8am. Now that's ... The time they left our office is significant and you'll find out why in just a second. They left our office at 8am, they got on the subway to head downtown. They were going to clean apartments in a building on 17 John Street. 17 John Street just two blocks, two and a half blocks really from the World Trade Centers where the twin towers stood. They left our office at 8am and I went upstairs in the building to have a meeting with our staff of thirteen sales people and then my admin team, so I think there was seventeen of us. We had a stand-up meeting every morning, like a little huddle where we talked about what the priorities were for the day, so on and so forth. September 11th, 2001 was a beautiful day, just as September 11th this year was, and I was doing the stand-up meeting our break room with our sales and admin team. Behind me was a television and the television was always on, and it was always tuned to a news channel. We had to be into the news because a lot of our clients were in the financial services industry, we needed to know what was going on on the markets. As I'm doing the stand-up meeting, I'm going through my points for the day, On this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show I share my September 11th story.  This was recorded on location, overlooking the 9/11 memorial, the day after the fifteenth anniversary of the attacks.

Here is a transcript of this show:

Welcome once again everyone to another edition of the Sixty Seconds Sales Show. I’m your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today’s show is all about following up. Today’s show is about your follow-up skills. It’s about the most important thing, the absolutely most important thing in sales, in business and in life. Follow-up is critical to your success as an entrepreneur, as a business leader and as a sales professional. Before we get in a follow-up, I want to take a moment and recognize our fantastic producer, the lovely and talented Nancy Popp. Good morning Nancy. How are you today?

Hey David. I’m doing good. How about you?

I’m doing great. Nancy helps us with finding guests, she helps us with getting great questions every week and she helps us put the show together, so thank you Nancy for all that you do for us. We are today, talking about follow-up. Before we get into follow-up, I want to tell you about an unusual experience I had this week. We’re recording this show today. We’re recording it, it’s just a couple of days after the 15th anniversary of September 11th, and this day in history, it’s one of those days that for me that is surreal. Many of you who have followed me for awhile know that this day has some significance for me.

I worked in Manhattan on September 11th, 2001. I ran a corporate housing company and we had three hundred employees, but in particular we had thirty that worked in Manhattan cleaning apartments. We had eight hundred apartments in Manhattan, and this crew of thirty people would clean all of our apartments, some of them once a week, some of them twice a month. On September 11th, 2001 I was in my office, and I had held our cleaning crew back because we had an awards ceremony. We were giving out the awards for the folks who had, we’d had a contest over the summer and we were giving out awards for the winners of the contest, we’d had a breakfast.

Usually the housekeepers who worked with me in our offices at 518 5th Avenue, which is 5th Avenue and 43rd street, just two blocks from Grand Central Station, usually these fantastic men and women, the housekeepers that worked with us, would leave our office no later than 8am. Some days they would go to the Upper East Side, some days they would go to the Upper West Side, some days they would go downtown to work in the apartments that we managed. Well on September 11th, 2001, I held them back. They left our office at 8 o’clock, and a crew of twelve of them, it was ten housekeepers, a housekeeping trainee, and a housekeeping supervisor left our office at 8am.

Now that’s … The time they left our office is significant and you’ll find out why in just a second. They left our office at 8am, they got on the subway to head downtown. They were going to clean apartments in a building on 17 John Street. 17 John Street just two blocks, two and a half blocks really from the World Trade Centers where the twin towers stood. They left our office at 8am and I went upstairs in the building to have a meeting with our staff of thirteen sales people and then my admin team, so I think there was seventeen of us. We had a stand-up meeting every morning, like a little huddle where we talked about what the priorities were for the day, so on and so forth.

September 11th, 2001 was a beautiful day, just as September 11th this year was, and I was doing the stand-up meeting our break room with our sales and admin team. Behind me was a television and the television was always on, and it was always tuned to a news channel. We had to be into the news because a lot of our clients were in the financial services industry, we needed to know what was going on on the markets. As I’m doing the stand-up meeting, I’m going through my points for the day, I see one of our account managers put her hand over her mouth, and the two people next to her had this look on their face of shock. I turned around, looked on the TV, and behind me on the screen, it was about ten to, it was 8:50, it was ten to nine. Behind me was a picture of the World Trade Center, I think it’s the South Tower with a hole in it and the smoke and flames coming out of the hole. It was just maybe five or six or seven minutes after the first plane hit the South Tower.

We all had stopped and we were watching the TV, it seemed like it was an hour. It was really probably about thirty seconds. My operations manager, who my operations executive who happened to be a childhood friend of mine. I brought him into the business because of his expertise in operations, he grabbed me and he whispered in my ear, “The housekeepers.” At that point, I ended the meeting and we walked down the hall to my office where I had a larger screen TV and I put that scene on the TV in my office. I told my operations manager, I said, “Get on the phone with the housekeepers.” Each housekeeper had a cell phone that we’d given them, a company cell phone. I said “Get on the phone with them and tell them they have to get back here. Tell them that we’re going to send one of the linen vans to pick them up and they have to get back uptown as quickly as possible. I don’t want them down there because it’s going to be chaos down there.”

He ran out of the office to start calling the cell phone numbers for the housekeepers that left my office at 8 o’clock, who should have been down by the World Trade Centers working by this point. The vans that I referenced, we had two linen vans that drove all around the city and they would help the housekeepers by picking up the dirty linen and dropping off the clean linen. They were driven by two of our guys. One guy would stay in the van, the other guy would bring the linen into the building, take the dirty linen out. What I was figuring is they would, all these housekeepers would jump in one of the vans and get back to the office as quickly as possible, and then we’d figure out how to clean those apartments another day.

Well the story goes that at 8:45 their subway car pulled up to the station. They were pulling little suitcases behind them with cleaning products. They walked out onto the street at 8:46, 8:47, that’s the exact moment that the plane, the first plane hit the World Trade Center. While we’re in the office, this whole group of us is in my office, we’re watching this unfold on TV, we’re watching live as the second plane hits the North Tower. We knew at that moment, the people on television knew and they said as much, that this was not an accident. This was an attack. I grabbed the entire phone list and I gave it to a second person, my revenue manager, I said, “Call everyone out in the field. We need to get them out of Manhattan as quickly as possible. Just tell them wherever they are, get out of Manhattan. Anyone who’s on the the east side of Manhattan, go to Brooklyn, go to Queens. If they can, go to where they live, but tell us where they’re going, and have them call us when they get there. If they’re on the west side, have them go to Jersey.”

Then I went into Scott’s office, my operations manager and I said, “Did you get ahold of the twelve who are downtown?” He said, “No, we can’t get a hold of them. Their cell phones are directly to voice mail.” I said, “Call the building where they’re supposed to be. He called the building, they hadn’t been there yet. Our focus then became on getting in touch with those people because at this point, downtown Manhattan was chaos. It was absolute chaos. People didn’t know what to do, they were teeming, they were coming out of the buildings, the World Trade Center buildings as fast as they could to get away from there. Firefighters were rushing toward the buildings, police were rushing toward the buildings, there’s rush hour traffic heading downtown. Both of our linen vans on the road were on either highway, on either side of Manhattan. One was on the West Side Highway, one was on the FDR Drive.

I called them and I said to them, “Look,” the first van, the van who is on the FDR called in to us. They were stuck in traffic, they were by the Manhattan Bridge, and they said, “What do we do? We see the smoke coming from downtown. We’re still heading downtown but we’re stuck in traffic. Traffic is not moving at all. They may be closing the FDR Drive.” I sent them over the Manhattan Bridge. I sent them to Brooklyn. I said, “Go park the van somewhere. Park in a shopping center parking lot, park in a diner parking lot. Call me when you get there. If you live out that way, then drive home.” One of the guys said, “Yes I do. I do live out that way and I know a perfect spot to park the van.” I said, “Great. Go there. Call me when you get there.”

I called the second van on the West Side Highway. They had said that they were heading uptown. They were heading away from where all the trouble was. I said, “Terrific. Where do you live?” The driver said “I live in the Bronx.” I said, “Take the van home. Drive as quickly as you can. Don’t break any laws. Drive as quickly as you can to the Bronx. Park the car in a parking lot, in a safe place. Let me know when you get there.” We had one opportunity left to pick up these twelve people, and that was a truck that we had that delivered appliances. We installed appliances in buildings and these guys were going to the same building where the housekeepers were going because we had some new apartments that had just come online for a group from Goldman Sacs.

 

The guys were headed there. Scott called the appliance van and he said, “Look, we need you guys to get to 17 John Street as quickly as possible. There’s twelve people you have to pick up there. We got to get them out of there.” They said, “Fine. We’re going to do everything we can to get there. The issue is we have these appliances. We have $30,000 worth of appliances in the truck. How are we going to pick up everyone and get them in the truck?” At that point Scott had them on speaker phone and I said, “Don’t worry about that. We’ll address that issue when you get everybody together.” At that point, I was fully prepared, fully prepared to dump $30,000 worth of appliances on the street in Manhattan to get those people out of downtown. That was the only thing I could think of to get them out of there as quickly as possible.

We hung up with the appliance guys, we go back into my office and the elevator bell rings. We had a transparent door so we could see who was getting off the elevator and off the elevator stepped two NYPD officers, two New York Police Department officers. We buzzed them in the door. I go out to meet them in lobby, and very calmly the gentlemen says to me, “We don’t want you to panic, but we need you to get your people out of the building as quickly as possible. There’s a bomb in Grand Central Station, and we’re evacuating all the buildings in this area. When you get down to the street, run as far as you can, as fast as you can to the West.”

Not panicking, we went into the office, I called everyone and we walked down the stairs because they told us not to take the elevator, down to the street, and then we ran as fast as we could. We got to, we had about a block and a half away to where a Dunkin Donuts was on the corner of 6th Avenue and 44th Street. I stopped everyone, I said, “Here’s what we’re going to do. We’re going to go to,” We’re in the Dunkin Donuts now. By the way, the Dunkin Donuts is still operating. They’re still selling coffee, people are still buying coffee and donuts. Meanwhile, people are leaving Manhattan as fast as they can. They’re running down 42nd Street to get to Port Authority. In Dunkin Donuts I said, “No one has to stay. You’re welcome to leave and go home. Obviously this is a serious situation. Those of you who want to stay, you stay with us. We will stay together. We’ll be safe. We’re going to head toward Central Park because there are no tall buildings there that people can attack. Those of you who want to leave, we will find a way to get you out of the city right now. Take two minutes and decide what you are going to do.”

While these people were deciding what they were going to do, a couple of us, my leadership team and I were talking about how we were going to get the housekeepers. What we decided was that we were just going to continue to call the housekeepers call phones. If we could not call them, if we couldn’t get a hold of them, we would figure out something else to do. The bottom line is, five people ended up staying. Four people and I ended up staying. Everybody else ended up going home. At that point, what we didn’t know was, both of the, the first tower had collapsed and while we were trying to put people on buses to get them out of New York, the second tower wound up collapsing. The buses that we were trying to put them on were full because the city had made all the buses heading out the city free. All the MTA buses were free and people were packed into them. The drivers were instructed fill your buses and drive out of the city as quickly as possible. People were instructed to just get on the bus and go wherever it was going because no one knew what was going to happen in New York in the hours to come.

Nine buses filled with people covered in ash and soot passed by before the folks I was with could get on. Once they got on, the five of us, myself, Scott Brennan, my operations managers and three other people went back to the office. The building hadn’t blown up. They had cleared, there was a NYPD officer on the corner, we asked them, they had cleared the bomb scare. We went back to the office and we continued to try and call the cell phones of the people who were downtown. At that point, it was an hour and a half after the appliance van was supposed to be heading to pick them up. At that point, we heard from the appliance van. They were on the West Side Highway. It was closed. Both towers had collapsed and the plume, the cloud of ash and smoke had covered the appliance van, our guys were inside.

They called and they said, “People are leaving their cars. They’re abandoning their cars and they’re running. What do you want us to do?” I said, “You got to get out of there. Leave the truck. Just leave the truck and run as fast as you can. Go to one of the piers. Pier 60 is right near there. Go to,” They were just south of Chinatown, just north of the downtown area. I said, “Pier 60 is near there. See if you can get on any boat, any boat that is near there. Whatever cash you have in your pocket, pay people, pay whoever you have to. Get on the boat. I’ll reimburse you. Get to Jersey. Just get out of Manhattan as quickly as you can.” We knew, at that point, we had no way to pick these people up. That was probably one of the worst feelings I’ve ever experienced in my life. At that point, I was out of ideas. I was flat out of ideas.

Back in the building, our phones are ringing off the hook with our guests, relatives and friends who are calling, wondering if their loved ones are safe. With our relatives and friends, my family’s calling, the worker’s families are calling. People are calling from our corporate office wondering who’s there and who’s not. That was … Hours seemed like minutes and again, in the afternoon at 2 o’clock, the NYPD came and they said, “We’re going to evacuate again. We have another threat.” This time it was a building next to us. The building next to us was owned by a financial institution, and there was a bomb threat for the building next to us. They said, “Evacuate, but you can just go to the street. We don’t think this threat is credible, but we don’t want you to stay in the building just in case.”

We go down and none of us had eaten, so the five of us were standing in front … By the way, everybody who was with me is answering phones, trying to helped the loved ones of families find their family members. We’re standing at a hot dog truck and we’re wondering what’s going to happen next. We’re discussing how we’re going to get in touch with these people and get these people back from downtown. In the back of our minds we’re wondering if they’re okay. Scott and I decide, look here’s what we’re going to do. We’re going to leave the other folks in the office and we’re going to just walk downtown. That’s the only thing we could come up with. We’re going to walk downtown and try to find them. Eight million people, we’re going to try to find these twelve people.

At that point, we look to the left of the hot dog truck, the little hot dog truck and by the way, this guy is still working. He’s selling hot dogs to anybody and everybody who will come by on the street. We looked to the left of the hot dog truck and there is the housekeeping supervisor, one of the housekeepers and trainee. They’re covered in ash. They walk up to us, we just gave them a big hug and one of the housekeepers, the first thing one of the housekeepers said to me is, and she said it in Spanish, but I’ll translate it for you, that she is sorry. She dropped her suitcase of cleaning supplies in Chinatown because it just got too heavy.

They walked from Chinatown to tell us that everyone was safe. The nine other people, that when the second plane hit, the nine other people, they all were able to run to Battery Park, which is just south of the World Trade Center. When the first plane hit, they ran to Battery Park. They saw the second plane hit there, and at that point, boats just started coming and pulling up to where the boats come to take people to the Statue of Liberty. They hopped on a tug boat actually and they were evacuated to Jersey City, the Jersey City area. The place is called Newport, but it’s really between Jersey City and Hoboken. The nine of them were evacuated over there. They were fine. They were absolutely fine, and these three people walked to our office to tell me they were fine.

Now, I tell you this story because this is … The thing about this for me that always makes it … For me this illustrates the power of relationships in business. We talk about the sixty second sale, and we talk about the sixty second sale within the context of connecting with customers, connecting with clients, and developing a relationship that lasts a lifetime. Every year on that day, on September 11th, I connect with the people who I was with. Every year on that day, we remind ourselves of how important that relationship was.

We were a close-knit group, we were very successful and everyone was … We had fun at work but the bond we share over this experience is so strong that fifteen years later, so many things have changed, but the one thing remains the same is the feeling we have for one another. Now your goal is to create that type of connection with your customers, without those dramatic events, without the need for something as powerful as that. Every year I connect with these folks and I just thank them. Every year I thank them for being with me on that day, for being a part of my life and for essentially helping me get through what was a very difficult day.

I know everyone has their own 9-11 story, and I know a lot of 9-11 stories don’t end the way mine ended, with our folks, with everyone being okay. I know that and I hope that God takes care of those who did not make it through that day. I’m sure he will. The power of a relationship to transcend the time and the place … I’ve moved on. I’ve worked in one additional place since then and now I own my own business. All those folks have moved on, they’re working in other places. Some of them didn’t have families, they’ve started families now. Some of them are doing different things in different states, but we all connect with one another on that day because of the power of the relationship we have. What brought us together was this tragedy, these traumatic events.

You can do the same thing in your business, with your clients through the joy of helping them achieve their goals. You don’t need this dramatic event in order create that relationship and create the connection. I share this story with you because for me, this is a story that reminds me that no matter what someone does in the work place, no matter how goofy or stupid or whatever mistake they make, at the end of the day, we’re all people and we’re here together to help one another. We’re here together to achieve common goals. That’s what you and I are doing with our clients, that’s what we’re doing with one another in the workplace.

I hope that this story in a way, brings you some sense of hope. It brings you a sense that you can create powerful relationships with the people in your job, relationships that transcend what you’re doing in the current moment and you can create relationships that are really powerful and meaningful over the long term. Work is not just a place you go between nine and five, but it’s an investment that you make emotionally. You make that investment emotionally in your clients, and you make that investment emotionally in the people with whom you work.

To make things a little bit lighter, so to speak, I mean, my story on 9-11 has a very happy ending and it’s a hopeful one, but let’s lighten things up a little bit and bring it back to what we can do today to increase sales. Nancy, let’s look and see … Pick a question for me, I know we have a couple of them but pick a question for me that you think is particularly powerful that we can use to help folks get some more business in the door today.

Yeah, well we have a really great one from Todd Murco from El Paso, Texas. Todd asks, “Dave, you talk about sending referral sources business before asking them to refer you. You always say that’s how you create evangelists. Well there’s one guy I’ve sent three different deals to, and he hasn’t sent me anything back yet. How many more deals should I send him before I move on to someone else?”

Great question. When do you give up? When do you give up on sending business to somebody? All right Todd, thank you very much for the question. The answer to this is … Three times is a lot. Here’s what I would do. The first you send them a deal, if the deal closes and he doesn’t call to thank you, you should call to follow-up and see how the deal went. The second time you send him a deal, you say, “Listen,” if the first one didn’t close, you say, “Listen, I hope I got you the right guy. I hope this goes well. Let me know how it goes.” The third time you send you send them something, say, “Listen I sent you two people in the past. You followed up with me and you told me how they went. I’m really glad they went well, but I hope this one closes too.”

After you’ve sent them that third deal, what you should do is you should call them up and you should say, “Listen, I want to make sure that I’m sending you the right people. Have those deals closed?” If he says yes, say, “That’s great. I’m happy to send you these deals because I know you would do the same thing for me,” and then just stay quiet. I know you would do the same thing for me, and see what he says. What he will normally say is, “Oh I absolutely would.” Then at that point, you say to him, “Well, would you like to hear who my ideal client is?” He’ll tell you. He’ll tell you exactly who his ideal client is. I’m sorry, you tell him exactly who your idea client is. When you tell him exactly who your ideal client is, he should say to you, “I know somebody like that,” or “I can refer you somebody like that.” If he doesn’t, then it’s up to you to say, “Would you be on the lookout for that person, and would you send me that person if you see them?” He should say yes. I mean at that point he should say yes and if you don’t get anything from him, and you don’t want to send him anymore business, that’s up to you.

My rule of thumb is three attempts Todd. I think three attempts are good. I think that makes perfect sense to me. Calling him each time to follow-up to see if the deals closed. If he doesn’t offer to send you any business, you simply say to him, “Listen, would you like to hear who my ideal referral source, who my ideal client is?” At that point, you tell him who the ideal client is, and you see what he does. If he doesn’t send you anything, you’re done. Three attempts is good. You make sure you let him know that you’re in the business of accepting referrals as well. You make sure you let him know that you’ll take great care of referrals, as if they were your family. After that happens, nothing else, you don’t have to do anything else. You’ve done everything you can.

Then he’ll start to notice that you aren’t sending him deals anymore and he’ll make more of an effort. You can point blank tell him, “Listen, I live off of the referrals people send me. If you want me to keep you sending referrals, I need you to help me out and be on the look out for some clients.” Being transparent and telling people exactly what’s going on, telling people exactly how you feel, that’s the best way to do business. If he says, “How come you’re not sending me anybody anymore? You sent me these three great deals” You say to him, “Look, I have to spread the wealth around, and quite frankly, I’m sending deals to people who send me deals back, so I hope that we can work together. I hope that I can send you more stuff, but right now, I’m busy sending deals to my referral sources, people who are sending me business back.”

That’s the extreme case. Most people get what’s going on here. Most people will connect with you and they want to help you, so he’ll at least try. If somebody hasn’t sent you something after three times, and you’ve had a direct conversation with them and you’ve said to them, “Look, this is why I’m in business. I’m in business to make money. I need you to be on the lookout for this type of person.” If they still don’t send anybody to you, move on Todd. Three times is more than enough.

All right, I want to thank you all for being with me today on the Sixty Second Sales Show. Those of you who are watching on Facebook Live, thank you very much for joining us. You can reach out to me on Facebook at TheDaveLorenzo. That’s my Facebook handle, at TheDaveLorenzo. That’ll take you right to my page where you can watch us on Facebook Live. We do Facebook Live, not just when we do the podcasts. I do Facebook Live from the streets of New York, where I am today, from the beaches of Miami, where I am on most days, or even from the baseball field where I coach the next big league batting champion, Nicholas Lorenzo. Join me on Facebook Live at TheDaveLorenzo.

You can also hit me up on Twitter. I’m TheDaveLorenzo on Twitter too. If you like Sixty Second videos, sales tips, and goofy stuff. Right now I’m doing the push-up challenge, watch me on Instagram, at TheDaveLorenzo on Instagram. I’m posting pictures and sixty second videos on Instagram that’ll be sure to give you a chuckle and make you think. Nancy Popp, thank you very much once again. Thank you to Todd Murco for a great question. We’ll be back here next week with the Sixty Second Sales Show.

Here are three additional resources to help you make a great living and live a great life®:

Pride is Expensive

When you fool yourself it costs you money. Nothing works harder to conceal the truth than your own subconscious. Pride can cost you. Read this article to find out how.

Say No to Grow Sales

The most powerful word in sales is the word “NO.” Listen to this podcast to find out why.

Your Emotions are Killing Your Business

What you feel can cost you a deal. Read this article to find out how.

 

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On this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show I share my September 11th story.  This was recorded on location, overlooking the 9/11 memorial, the day after the fifteenth anniversary of the attacks. Here is a transcript of this show: On this episode of the 60 Second Sales Show I share my September 11th story.  This was recorded on location, overlooking the 9/11 memorial, the day after the fifteenth anniversary of the attacks.<br /> <br /> Here is a transcript of this show:<br /> <br /> Welcome once again everyone to another edition of the Sixty Seconds Sales Show. I'm your host, Dave Lorenzo. Today's show is all about following up. Today's show is about your follow-up skills. It's about the most important thing, the absolutely most important thing in sales, in business and in life. Follow-up is critical to your success as an entrepreneur, as a business leader and as a sales professional. Before we get in a follow-up, I want to take a moment and recognize our fantastic producer, the lovely and talented Nancy Popp. Good morning Nancy. How are you today?<br /> <br /> Hey David. I'm doing good. How about you?<br /> <br /> I'm doing great. Nancy helps us with finding guests, she helps us with getting great questions every week and she helps us put the show together, so thank you Nancy for all that you do for us. We are today, talking about follow-up. Before we get into follow-up, I want to tell you about an unusual experience I had this week. We're recording this show today. We're recording it, it's just a couple of days after the 15th anniversary of September 11th, and this day in history, it's one of those days that for me that is surreal. Many of you who have followed me for awhile know that this day has some significance for me.<br /> <br /> I worked in Manhattan on September 11th, 2001. I ran a corporate housing company and we had three hundred employees, but in particular we had thirty that worked in Manhattan cleaning apartments. We had eight hundred apartments in Manhattan, and this crew of thirty people would clean all of our apartments, some of them once a week, some of them twice a month. On September 11th, 2001 I was in my office, and I had held our cleaning crew back because we had an awards ceremony. We were giving out the awards for the folks who had, we'd had a contest over the summer and we were giving out awards for the winners of the contest, we'd had a breakfast.<br /> <br /> Usually the housekeepers who worked with me in our offices at 518 5th Avenue, which is 5th Avenue and 43rd street, just two blocks from Grand Central Station, usually these fantastic men and women, the housekeepers that worked with us, would leave our office no later than 8am. Some days they would go to the Upper East Side, some days they would go to the Upper West Side, some days they would go downtown to work in the apartments that we managed. Well on September 11th, 2001, I held them back. They left our office at 8 o'clock, and a crew of twelve of them, it was ten housekeepers, a housekeeping trainee, and a housekeeping supervisor left our office at 8am.<br /> <br /> Now that's ... The time they left our office is significant and you'll find out why in just a second. They left our office at 8am, they got on the subway to head downtown. They were going to clean apartments in a building on 17 John Street. 17 John Street just two blocks, two and a half blocks really from the World Trade Centers where the twin towers stood. They left our office at 8am and I went upstairs in the building to have a meeting with our staff of thirteen sales people and then my admin team, so I think there was seventeen of us. We had a stand-up meeting every morning, like a little huddle where we talked about what the priorities were for the day, so on and so forth.<br /> <br /> September 11th, 2001 was a beautiful day, just as September 11th this year was, and I was doing the stand-up meeting our break room with our sales and admin team. Behind me was a television and the television was always on, and it was always tuned to a news channel. We had to be into the news because a lot of our clients were in the financial services industry, we needed to know what was going on on the markets. Dave Lorenzo clean 29:27
Say No To Grow Sales https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/12/say-no-client/ Mon, 12 Sep 2016 16:00:23 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=654 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/12/say-no-client/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/12/say-no-client/feed/ 0 Say No To Grow Sales Sometimes you have to say no to grow sales. You control your business.  Don't ever forget that. This episode of The 60 Second Sales Show empowers you to take back control of your future by using the shortest yet most powerful expression: The word "NO." Sales and marketing expert Dave Lorenzo teaches you when and how is the proper time to say no to a prospective client, and how to teach your clients to say no as well. Learn the power of 'NO' so that you can increase your business and strengthen the quality of your client relationships.  Here is the transcript of this show: Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sale show. I'm your host Dave Lorenzo. Today's show is about "The Four Times the Word No Is Your Best Friend". The word "no" is your absolute best friend. I'm going to give you four times when it's totally and completely okay for you to say the word "no". All of us in business were raised thinking the customer is always right. You have to go out to your customer and say, "The answer is yes, what's your question?" I'm here to tell you right now today that's absolute hogwash. You do not need to worry about saying yes to your customer every single time. In fact, there are four specific instances when it's completely and totally okay for you to say no. The first instance when it's perfectly fine for you to say no is when you're meeting with a client and you want to make sure that you get the deal, you're going to give your client permission to say no. Let me tell you how this works. I do this all the time and I absolutely love doing it. Someone calls my office, I'll give you an exact example, I got a phone two weeks ago from a gentleman who's an attorney. He's an attorney on the west Coast. He really wants to boost his sales. He does about a million and a half dollars a year, he's got a handful of people in his office, he wants to grow to be a $5 million operation which is really, really big for a law firm the size of which he currently operates, that type of growth is astronomical. Possible by phenomenal growth. He says to me, "I want to grow my law firm. I will do whatever it takes. I've purchased your products, I've read your books, I know you're the guy who can help me." He's very eager to work with me. He says, "I even know how much you charge. I've told to a couple of your clients whose testimonials I've seen on your website." This sounds like a great opportunity doesn't it? Sounds like something where I should be doing a dance in my office, I should be absolutely thrilled that this guy wants to work with me. I cannot wait. I should go out and I should buy a new car. This guy's going to put my kids through college. Over the years, I've come to learn as I know you have that this type of prospect is very, very dangerous. He gets us all excited, he gets emotionally-engaged, and then we wait and we wait, and we wait while he waits to give us his decision while he think about it, and then something else comes along and he has to work on it. The next thing we know, the days he was going to send us back the proposal in turn to weeks, the weeks turn to a month, he gets distracted by a shiny object. This type of prospect will absolutely kill you. Here's what we do to head them off. We say to him, "Mr. Prospect, this is fantastic. I am very happy that you found me. I know that we can work together but here's the thing. I need to ask you a few questions to make sure that we're a good fit." Then you proceed to ask him some questions and you uncover his real needs, you help him diagnose what the real problem is, and in this case, his real problem is one of being able to delegate and manage. I asked some pointed questions around that. I really opened up a sore and rubs some salt in it to make sure he was ready to do business. Then I said to him, "I'm going to give you 3 options." I gave him the 3 options and I said, "Of course, there's a 4th option that's available to you and that's for us not to wo... Say No To Grow Sales

Sometimes you have to say no to grow sales. You control your business.  Don’t ever forget that. This episode of The 60 Second Sales Show empowers you to take back control of your future by using the shortest yet most powerful expression: The word “NO.”

Sales and marketing expert Dave Lorenzo teaches you when and how is the proper time to say no to a prospective client, and how to teach your clients to say no as well. Learn the power of ‘NO’ so that you can increase your business and strengthen the quality of your client relationships. 

Here is the transcript of this show:

Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sale show. I’m your host Dave Lorenzo. Today’s show is about “The Four Times the Word No Is Your Best Friend”. The word “no” is your absolute best friend. I’m going to give you four times when it’s totally and completely okay for you to say the word “no”. All of us in business were raised thinking the customer is always right. You have to go out to your customer and say, “The answer is yes, what’s your question?”

I’m here to tell you right now today that’s absolute hogwash. You do not need to worry about saying yes to your customer every single time. In fact, there are four specific instances when it’s completely and totally okay for you to say no.

The first instance when it’s perfectly fine for you to say no is when you’re meeting with a client and you want to make sure that you get the deal, you’re going to give your client permission to say no. Let me tell you how this works. I do this all the time and I absolutely love doing it. Someone calls my office, I’ll give you an exact example, I got a phone two weeks ago from a gentleman who’s an attorney. He’s an attorney on the west Coast. He really wants to boost his sales. He does about a million and a half dollars a year, he’s got a handful of people in his office, he wants to grow to be a $5 million operation which is really, really big for a law firm the size of which he currently operates, that type of growth is astronomical. Possible by phenomenal growth.

He says to me, “I want to grow my law firm. I will do whatever it takes. I’ve purchased your products, I’ve read your books, I know you’re the guy who can help me.” He’s very eager to work with me. He says, “I even know how much you charge. I’ve told to a couple of your clients whose testimonials I’ve seen on your website.” This sounds like a great opportunity doesn’t it? Sounds like something where I should be doing a dance in my office, I should be absolutely thrilled that this guy wants to work with me. I cannot wait. I should go out and I should buy a new car. This guy’s going to put my kids through college.

Over the years, I’ve come to learn as I know you have that this type of prospect is very, very dangerous. He gets us all excited, he gets emotionally-engaged, and then we wait and we wait, and we wait while he waits to give us his decision while he think about it, and then something else comes along and he has to work on it. The next thing we know, the days he was going to send us back the proposal in turn to weeks, the weeks turn to a month, he gets distracted by a shiny object. This type of prospect will absolutely kill you.

Here’s what we do to head them off. We say to him, “Mr. Prospect, this is fantastic. I am very happy that you found me. I know that we can work together but here’s the thing. I need to ask you a few questions to make sure that we’re a good fit.” Then you proceed to ask him some questions and you uncover his real needs, you help him diagnose what the real problem is, and in this case, his real problem is one of being able to delegate and manage. I asked some pointed questions around that. I really opened up a sore and rubs some salt in it to make sure he was ready to do business. Then I said to him, “I’m going to give you 3 options.” I gave him the 3 options and I said, “Of course, there’s a 4th option that’s available to you and that’s for us not to work together at all. I want to give you permission to say no right up front.”

He stopped in his tracks and he said, “This is not what I was expecting.” He said, “I expected you to give me the hard sell. I expected you to give me 3 options because I know how you operate. I expected to push me toward the most expensive option.” I said, his name is Steven, I said, “Steven, I can’t do that.” I said, “I don’t know what the right approach is for you. Only you can decide that. In fact, I don’t know if any of this makes sense to you at all. These are the three ways I see us working together. You know the value that I can provide. You said you knew that coming in. You said you were ready to make a commitment now. I’m giving you the opportunity to say no. Do you want to move forward?” All it takes is a simple word, either yes or no. If it’s a yes, tell me which option you select.

There was silence on the phone. The silence seemed like it was an hour, it was probably only 4 or 5 seconds. He said, “Yes”, he picked the middle option, and we started working together. Doesn’t always work like that. It’s important for you to understand that if he had said no and he wanted to move on and he didn’t want to work together, you would have done yourself and the client a service. I would have done myself and the client a service in that case. The reason is because that commitment wouldn’t have been there. You always give the client the opportunity to say no. That’s the first place where you’re absolute positive best friend.

You can do this multiple times. You can do it, if you’re an in-person sales person and you’re setting up a meeting, you give the person the opportunity to say no to setting up the meeting in the first place. If they say yes, you can be… if you say to them, “Listen, the meeting is set for tomorrow at 4:00. I’m going to give you right now, I’m going to give you the opportunity to say no. If for any reason you don’t think you’re going to be able to make that, say no right now and we won’t schedule the meeting. Are you going to be able to make it?” They say yes.

Then, you call to confirm the meeting, you call in the morning, you call them up and say “Hey listen, I’m just calling to confirm. If you can’t make it, it’s okay, just tell me no right now.” They confirm the meeting with you, they say yes, you can be sure they’ll be there at that point. Then before moving to the next step in the sales process, whatever your sales process is, before moving to the next step, you always give the client permission to say no before moving to the next step.

This empowers the client and it makes the decision his. He takes ownership of the decision and that means that he’ll be committed to the solutions that you provide and there’ll be less chance of him backing out and less chance of any buyer’s remorse.

The second time that the word “no” is your best friend is when you give yourself permission to say no to your client. You give yourself permission to say no to your clients. You do this on a few different occasions. The first time you do this is when there’s a legal, a moral, or an ethical concern involving your work with a client. If your client asks you to do something that is forcing you to operate in a grey area, you simply say no. You don’t need to give someone a reason for saying no.

One of my clients asked me to do him a favor one time. This is years ago. He said to me, “Dave”, he did some work in South America as well as in the Unites States, he said, “Dave, I have a large amount of cash. What I’d like to do is I’d like to pay for your services in cash. I want to pay 100% more than the value of your services. I’d like you to refund me the 50% that is over and above the level of your service. Would you do that?”

That to me was not right. In fact, it is illegal. It could be considered tax evasion. I don’t know where the money is coming from. It could even have been considered money laundering. I said, “I appreciate the opportunity. I’m just going to have to say no to you.” I didn’t give a reason why. He prodded me and he prodded and I didn’t give a reason why because when you say no, you don’t owe anyone an explanation.

The second time you say to clients is just when you have a bad gut feeling. You’re talking to a client, and he’s giving you some bad vibes as yo how you might work together. In my case, when I’m talking to a client and I’m interviewing him and I’m finding reasons why he is not as successful as he should be or reasons why she’s not as successful as she should be, and I’m learning that they’ve gotten good advice in the past, they just refused to take it and act on it, that give me a bad gut feeling. I say no to that client. I just say, “At this point, I don’t think it makes sense for us to work together. I’m happy to revisit it the future. Why don’t you check back with me in, say, a year or a year and a half?” Usually the clients will get the hint and they decide not to work with me.

When you have a bad gut feeling, even if everything is great with a client, whenever you’re working with that client or you’re providing a product or a service to that client, you’re always going to feel bad about it. I highly encourage you, when you have a bad gut feeling, just say no.

The third time you give yourself permission to say no to a client is when there’s low compensation. When you feel like the value you’re receiving isn’t equitable for the value you’re providing. That’s your fault if you say yes and you take on that client, that’s your fault. Don’t do it. When the compensation is low just say no, ask for what you’re worth, and only move forward if you’re getting paid what you’re worth.

The fourth point under giving yourself permission to say no to clients is when there’s high personal labor intensity. I had a client I worked with 3 years ago who was on the West Coast. My work with this client required me to fly to the West Coast for two days once a month. I live in Miami. It’s a full day to get out there. Even if you take a flight late in the afternoon, you still get out there and you pretty much lost at least half a day on the way out, but coming back, because of the time difference, you lose an entire day. Lose almost 8 hours, you can take an overnight flight but then you’re exhausted and I’m in terrible shape for working with a client. That’s 3 1/2 days out of each month that client took out of my work schedule, took out of my schedule for calling on new clients, new potential clients. Although the fee workstations terrific and the client was the best person I’ve worked with in a long, long time, it was not a good opportunity for me. I should have said no to that.

Now, I set specific guidelines and I say no to high personal labor intensity projects. I still do some of those but I’ll do them via video conference or I’ll do them via telephone instead of in person.

The third time you say no is to improve your time integrity. The most powerful, most important asset you possess is your time. To improve your time integrity, is one of the best reasons to say no to a client or a prospective client.

Let me give some examples. #1 IF there’s no good return on your investment from your time, you say no. You just say no. When it comes to return on investment from your time, think about a charity that you may get involved with. You may be very excited. I’ll give you a perfect example. For me, when I first moved to Miami 2006-2007, I was a big proponent of public access to health care. This is before the Affordable Care Act. In Miami, there was a hospital that was doing some great things. I volunteered, I contributed some money, I sat on the Board of the Hospital Foundation, the investment of my time became greater and greater and greater. Then, traveling to the meetings and from the meetings took a couple of hours there, an hour there and an hour back. The meetings themselves were long. They turned out to be very productive. I was disappointed. Well no, I was unpleasantly surprised. Actually, I guess you could say I was devastated by this.

I, at a certain point, just couldn’t take it anymore. I went to the Chairman of the Board of the foundation and I bowed out. I did so because the return on investment at my time, I just wasn’t feeling like I was productive enough. There return on investment of my time wasn’t significant enough. To maintain my time integrity, I had to bow out and I had to say no.

A couple of other times you say no to protect your time integrity is when you will be working with someone who sucks the life out of you. An energy sucker just flat out saying no, again, you don’t need to give a reason why, you don’t have to make up any excuses. Just say, “Mo, I   can’t go to lunch on Tuesday, Thank you. I’m not going to be able to go to lunch.”

You system no when guilt is the only motivating factor for you to say yes. This happens with family members all the time. Think about your Aunt Sally who you haven’t seen in 3 months, she calls you up, she says, “Why don’t you come over to my house anymore? Why don’t you come over for coffee on Saturday, bring your kids.” You know that Saturday is your day with your family but you’re feeling guilty because you haven’t seen it and [inaudible 00:13:36] in 3 months. If guilty is the only motivating factor, you got to say no, you got to say no. You need to maintain your time integrity.

The last time when no is you best friend, the last consequence when no can be your best friend is when you’re being asked to do something that’s incongruent with your goals. For example, think about the work that you would have to do that will make you good money in the short term but take you away from your chosen path in the long term.

In my case, I think about the one-on-one coaching that I used to do. When I started my practice, I did hours and hours of one-on-one coaching, sometimes as many as 5 or 6 hours a day, on he phone doing one-on-one coaching. It was great because I needed the money short term but I was limiting my ability to help people. I was limiting my ability to make an income.

I shifted to a group coaching model to an event-based model to a model where I could do one-to-many instead of one-on-one. That helped me grow my income and achieve my income goals year after year without sacrificing the time that it takes to do the one-on-one coaching. I was still providing that value. The clients were still succeeding, yet I was not sacrificing the long term goals for the short term need of the money.

Things are incongruent with your goals when the type of work takes you away from the work that you really want to be doing. When you feel like you’re not getting the amount of respect you deserve, or when it takes you down the path of suffering with a success. Think about that statement for a moment. You have built a success that you absolutely cannot stand. You’re successful, you’re making money, but you can’t spend your money. You’re successful, you’re making money, but you never see your family. You’re successful and you’re making money, but your health is suffering. You’re successful and you’re making money but you’re overweight, you’re single, you’re absolutely miserable because your life is not fulfilled. That’s why you say no to work that is taking you down the wrong path.

Let’s wrap up those four times when no is your bet friend. First, it’s when you give the client permission to say no, no is absolutely your best friend. The second is you give yourself permission to say no to clients. You do this when there’s high labor intensity, low compensation, you have a bad gut feeling or somebody says, “Do something that’s legal, moral and ethically incongruent with your beliefs, with your values.

The third time no is you best friend is when you want to improve time integrity. You say no to things that take you away from your time-focused, high integrity goals. The fourth time when no is your best friend is when you have to go down a path that’s incongruent with your long term goals, you’re making short term decisions, you’re making decisions that benefiting you in the short term but they’re taking you away from your long term goals of success.

Those are the four times when no can be your best friend. Right now, I want to turn to my best friend on this podcast, our producer, Nancy Pop because Nancy has a question for us.

Nancy, do you have a question that Samir from Eerie, Pennsylvania, a place you’re familiar with. I think Samir has a question for us.

I do. Today’s question is from Samir Abud in eerie, Pennsylvania. He says, “Dave, what do you think is the most important quality in sales?

Great question. You could ask 10 sales experts this question and you could get 10 different answers because there are a lot of good answers. My personal history and my work with my clients has proven to me that the best, most important quality for a fantastic sales professional or an entrepreneur, a business leader to possess is resilience.

You need to have the ability to come back over and over again from bad news, from a bad economy, from a bad personal situation, and you got to keep coming back and keep wanting to deliver value to your clients and to your prospective clients.

Here are a few ways, Samir, and all of those of you who are listening right now, here are a few ways you can strengthen that resilience muscle. The minute that you have a personal setback or a business setback, you get rejected, you lose a client, or something happens in your personal life and you’re facing some adversity, the minute that happens, here’s what I want you to do.

I want you to get on the phone and I want you to call one of your current clients which you have a conversation about how things are going and I want you to help that client solve a problem and feel good about it. Your current clients are with you because they believe in you. Your current clients are with you because they’re excited to work with you. I want you to get on the phone and call a current client, help him solve a problem, help him receive even more value. You can sell something to him if you like but only do if it’s going to provide more value to him and his business or him and his life. That’s the first thing you do when you’re suffering a setback.

The second thing I want you to do is I want you to go through all those great testimonials you have about your product, about your service. Really, really important. Read 5 or 6 or 7 and read a half-dozen. You’re going to help a client, you’re going to read 6 or 7 or 8 testimonials about how great you are, how great your clients were.

The third thing you’re going to do is you’re going to take a deep breath and you’re going to think about the success in your life that you’re most proud of. Maybe it’s raising a great kid, or maybe it’s winning the award for highest-performing sales professional in the office. Or maybe it’s the fact that you sold your last business for $50 million.

Whenever you suffer a setback, I want you to overwhelm those feelings with good feelings. If you’ve suffered a setback, I want you to do 3 specific things to reinforce the good in your life. Those good feelings will overwhelm the bad feelings. Never ever leave the office or never ever go to bed on a down note.

I’ll leave you with this analogy so that we can really drive this home. Those of you who have listened to the podcast, no, I’m a huge baseball fan, I’m a big baseball fanatic. My son plays baseball. He’s 7 years old. We practice every single day. He plays on a team that plays year round. Here in South Miami, baseball is like a religion.

Whenever you’re in the batting cage and pitching to my son or I’m pitching to the other members of his team, you always want the guy who’s hitting, the gal who’s hitting because there are women on our team too, you always want them to leave the cage after they have gotten the perfect hit, after they hit a line drive that crushes the screen right in front of the pitcher where they hit a line dry back over the pitchers head. That’s how you want them to leave the batting cage.

You never want them to leave the cage on a swing and a miss. You never want them to leave the cage on a weak foul ball, you want them to leave the cage when they’ve made great contact and the ringing sound of the bat hitting the ball is in their ears and the sound of the ball hitting the sides of the cage is the last thing they hear when they walk out. They hear a good job from the coach, good job from everyone waiting to get in the cage.

You want them to leave on that high not because that’s the thing they take away. When you’ve had a setback and you want to be resilient, you always leave the office thinking about talking to a client, after you talk to a client, after you’ve read your testimonials, and after you’ve focused on the most positive thing you can think of.

Those three things help blunt the feeling you have from the setback or the rejection or the adversity. In some way, it helps you reset your mind. Some setbacks are easier to overcome than others but whenever you catch yourself feeling that pull of sadness or depression related to the setback, I want you to do those 3 things because I want you to walk out of that cage. I want you to walk out of the office. I want you to put your head on the pillow at night thinking about the best things that happened and not about the setback. That’s how you develop your resilient muscle.

Samir, that was a great question, I really appreciate. As you can tell, I get fired up about this because that’s the one thing that has been responsible for my success. I haven’t had fewer setbacks than anyone else. I have the same number of setbacks that you have. I just come back from them stronger. I come back from them quicker.

If you want to connect with someone, if you want to connect with somebody who you can provide value to, the first thing you need to do is you need to connect with yourself and you need to have that self-awareness so that you can punch through any of that resistance and negativity, and bounce back even stronger than you were before.

Samir, thanks for the question. To those of you who are listening, I appreciate you listening. You can reach out to me with your questions on social media. You can find me on twitter, Facebook and Instagram @thedavelorenzo. That’s the @thedavelorenzo. I want to say thank you to Nancy Pop, our producer. Thank you to Samir for the question. I want to tank you for listening. I’ll be right back here with you again next week.

Here are three additional resources you can use to take control of your business:

The Most Important Quality for a Sales Professional

Do you know how to bounce back from rejection? This article will help you do that.

The Money You Are Leaving On The Table

If you are not doing this one thing, you are missing out on making good money.

Improve Sales Results: Focus on Progress not Perfection

Do not get hung up on perfection. Strive to make progress each day.

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Say No To Grow Sales Sometimes you have to say no to grow sales. You control your business.  Don't ever forget that. This episode of The 60 Second Sales Show empowers you to take back control of your future by using the shortest yet most powerful expre... Say No To Grow Sales<br /> Sometimes you have to say no to grow sales. You control your business.  Don't ever forget that. This episode of The 60 Second Sales Show empowers you to take back control of your future by using the shortest yet most powerful expression: The word "NO."<br /> Sales and marketing expert Dave Lorenzo teaches you when and how is the proper time to say no to a prospective client, and how to teach your clients to say no as well. Learn the power of 'NO' so that you can increase your business and strengthen the quality of your client relationships. <br /> Here is the transcript of this show:<br /> Welcome to another edition of the 60 Second Sale show. I'm your host Dave Lorenzo. Today's show is about "The Four Times the Word No Is Your Best Friend". The word "no" is your absolute best friend. I'm going to give you four times when it's totally and completely okay for you to say the word "no". All of us in business were raised thinking the customer is always right. You have to go out to your customer and say, "The answer is yes, what's your question?"<br /> <br /> I'm here to tell you right now today that's absolute hogwash. You do not need to worry about saying yes to your customer every single time. In fact, there are four specific instances when it's completely and totally okay for you to say no.<br /> <br /> The first instance when it's perfectly fine for you to say no is when you're meeting with a client and you want to make sure that you get the deal, you're going to give your client permission to say no. Let me tell you how this works. I do this all the time and I absolutely love doing it. Someone calls my office, I'll give you an exact example, I got a phone two weeks ago from a gentleman who's an attorney. He's an attorney on the west Coast. He really wants to boost his sales. He does about a million and a half dollars a year, he's got a handful of people in his office, he wants to grow to be a $5 million operation which is really, really big for a law firm the size of which he currently operates, that type of growth is astronomical. Possible by phenomenal growth.<br /> <br /> He says to me, "I want to grow my law firm. I will do whatever it takes. I've purchased your products, I've read your books, I know you're the guy who can help me." He's very eager to work with me. He says, "I even know how much you charge. I've told to a couple of your clients whose testimonials I've seen on your website." This sounds like a great opportunity doesn't it? Sounds like something where I should be doing a dance in my office, I should be absolutely thrilled that this guy wants to work with me. I cannot wait. I should go out and I should buy a new car. This guy's going to put my kids through college.<br /> <br /> Over the years, I've come to learn as I know you have that this type of prospect is very, very dangerous. He gets us all excited, he gets emotionally-engaged, and then we wait and we wait, and we wait while he waits to give us his decision while he think about it, and then something else comes along and he has to work on it. The next thing we know, the days he was going to send us back the proposal in turn to weeks, the weeks turn to a month, he gets distracted by a shiny object. This type of prospect will absolutely kill you.<br /> <br /> Here's what we do to head them off. We say to him, "Mr. Prospect, this is fantastic. I am very happy that you found me. I know that we can work together but here's the thing. I need to ask you a few questions to make sure that we're a good fit." Then you proceed to ask him some questions and you uncover his real needs, you help him diagnose what the real problem is, and in this case, his real problem is one of being able to delegate and manage. I asked some pointed questions around that. I really opened up a sore and rubs some salt in it to make sure he was ready to do business. Then I said to him, "I'm going to give you 3 options." I gave him the 3 options and I said, Dave Lorenzo clean 23:41
Transform Your FAKE Sales Process into a FREE Sales Process https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/05/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-9-transform-fake-sales-process-free-sales-process/ Mon, 05 Sep 2016 16:00:09 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=595 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/05/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-9-transform-fake-sales-process-free-sales-process/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/09/05/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-9-transform-fake-sales-process-free-sales-process/feed/ 0 In this episode, Dave talks about how to take your Frustrating Annoying Killing you Everyday sales process and transform it into a Fun Rewarding Easy and Engaging sales process. Here is the transcript: Hi there, everyone and welcome to another edition of this 60-second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo, I'm your host and I'm the guy who helps you close more deals fast and helps you create lifelong relationships that not only add value to your clients, but also help you get home on time for dinner every single night. Today, we are talking about how to transform your sales process from a fake sales process into a free sales process. That's right, we're going to take your sales process and transform it from being frustrating, annoying, and killing you each and every single day. That's fake into a free process. Something that's fun, rewarding, engaging, and educational. I'm Dave Lorenzo and this process was developed not only to help you, but I'm a convert of my own system. This process is something that developed out of necessity. This process is, there's 5 real key elements to this process and there are 5 deadly sins, 5 mistakes I was making, and that's why I develop this process to help myself. My mission is to help transform your fake sales process just like my process was fake into a free sales process, 1 that you will embrace and enjoy every single day. Let me run down those 5 deadly sins that I was committing and hopefully help you transform your sales process from 1 that is frustrating, annoying, and killing you everyday into a 1 that is fun, rewarding, engaging, and educational. The first deadly sin that sales professionals make that entrepreneurs, that business leaders make, all the time is they give up control of the sales process, they give up control of the sales process, they're like a sailboat on the ocean just drifting at the mercy of the tide. You have the ability to control how much you make and when you make it, and you have the ability to control what you do with your life. Being able to sell, being a fantastic sales professional, being an entrepreneur who can sell, being a business leader who can help people for compensation because that's what selling is it's helping people for compensation, being able to do that gives you control of your life. I'll tell you my story, I'll tell you why this was so important to me in the hopes that will resonate with you. For my entire career, I did things the way you're doing them right now, I knocked on doors, I tried to help people. Most of them didn't want the help I could provide. They give me knocking on a hundred doors and getting 99 no's, but I lived for that 1 yes because I thought every time somebody rejects me I'm getting closer to a yes. My friends, that is a horrible way to go through life but that's what I did. I did it really, really well. The first business that I built from scratch, from zero was a hotel, it was a startup and that hotel did $5 million a year an annual revenue by the time I was finished and I recruited our corporate accounts myself. I was the general manager, I was on the road recruiting those accounts. The second business I built was a corporate housing brand for a large hospitality company. You may have heard of the Marriott Organization, I worked for them and I built their execu-stay brand in New York City, I took that from nothing to $50 million a year in 3 years and I did it by knocking on doors and convincing people to come and work with us. Imagine, 100 opportunities 99 no's. I knocked down every door I could at a sales team of 12, they knocked down every door they could. Then the third time I did this was a consulting company, the consulting company based in Manhattan did no business when I started, took them to over $200 million a year in annual revenue, knocked down doors the whole time and I'll tell you my friends that is a painful way to go through life. Then 1 day something happened. I was at the mercy of my clients, In this episode, Dave talks about how to take your Frustrating Annoying Killing you Everyday sales process and transform it into a Fun Rewarding Easy and Engaging sales process.

Here is the transcript:

Hi there, everyone and welcome to another edition of this 60-second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo, I’m your host and I’m the guy who helps you close more deals fast and helps you create lifelong relationships that not only add value to your clients, but also help you get home on time for dinner every single night.

Today, we are talking about how to transform your sales process from a fake sales process into a free sales process. That’s right, we’re going to take your sales process and transform it from being frustrating, annoying, and killing you each and every single day. That’s fake into a free process. Something that’s fun, rewarding, engaging, and educational. I’m Dave Lorenzo and this process was developed not only to help you, but I’m a convert of my own system. This process is something that developed out of necessity. This process is, there’s 5 real key elements to this process and there are 5 deadly sins, 5 mistakes I was making, and that’s why I develop this process to help myself.

My mission is to help transform your fake sales process just like my process was fake into a free sales process, 1 that you will embrace and enjoy every single day. Let me run down those 5 deadly sins that I was committing and hopefully help you transform your sales process from 1 that is frustrating, annoying, and killing you everyday into a 1 that is fun, rewarding, engaging, and educational. The first deadly sin that sales professionals make that entrepreneurs, that business leaders make, all the time is they give up control of the sales process, they give up control of the sales process, they’re like a sailboat on the ocean just drifting at the mercy of the tide.

You have the ability to control how much you make and when you make it, and you have the ability to control what you do with your life. Being able to sell, being a fantastic sales professional, being an entrepreneur who can sell, being a business leader who can help people for compensation because that’s what selling is it’s helping people for compensation, being able to do that gives you control of your life. I’ll tell you my story, I’ll tell you why this was so important to me in the hopes that will resonate with you.

For my entire career, I did things the way you’re doing them right now, I knocked on doors, I tried to help people. Most of them didn’t want the help I could provide. They give me knocking on a hundred doors and getting 99 no’s, but I lived for that 1 yes because I thought every time somebody rejects me I’m getting closer to a yes. My friends, that is a horrible way to go through life but that’s what I did. I did it really, really well. The first business that I built from scratch, from zero was a hotel, it was a startup and that hotel did $5 million a year an annual revenue by the time I was finished and I recruited our corporate accounts myself.

I was the general manager, I was on the road recruiting those accounts. The second business I built was a corporate housing brand for a large hospitality company. You may have heard of the Marriott Organization, I worked for them and I built their execu-stay brand in New York City, I took that from nothing to $50 million a year in 3 years and I did it by knocking on doors and convincing people to come and work with us. Imagine, 100 opportunities 99 no’s. I knocked down every door I could at a sales team of 12, they knocked down every door they could.

Then the third time I did this was a consulting company, the consulting company based in Manhattan did no business when I started, took them to over $200 million a year in annual revenue, knocked down doors the whole time and I’ll tell you my friends that is a painful way to go through life. Then 1 day something happened. I was at the mercy of my clients, always waiting, wanting, wondering when the next deal was going to come, then 1 day I was in my office and I’m sitting preparing a report for a big client, pharmaceutical company, waiting, waiting, waiting, for the phone to ring for my next sale. The phone rang and it was my client but it wasn’t about a sale.

My client saying that he needed to see me immediately with the results of this study that we had taken a year to produce, we weren’t supposed to deliver the results of this study to him for a number of weeks for 3 and a half weeks. However, he wanted the results now, I told him it would be difficult for me to pull this stuff together, it would be hard for me to get my team and come over at that moment. He said, “If you can get here in the next 2 and a half hours we’re going to pull our business.”

This was a $10 million year account. Guess what I did? I put on my jacket, tightened up my tie, grab the file, and went over with whatever I had even though it wasn’t ready. I walked out into the street on to 5th Avenue in New York City down toward his office I got 2 blocks for my office at the corner of 6th Avenue and 43rd Street. There were 30 people in the crosswalk, 29 of them were successfully able to avoid the taxi cab that hit me. The next thing I remember is I was lying flat on my back with no feeling from my arm pits down, looking up its ceiling tiles in the hallway of St. Vincent’s Hospital thinking to myself, if I had only had the courage of my conviction, if I only had control over my future, if I only had the ability to tell this client I just can’t over there.

Today give me 24 hours to prepare life would be different for me. I did what all of us would do, I did what anyone does when they’re in a situation like that I made a bargain with God. I said, if you get me out of this I promise I will make a change. I promise I will take back control of my career, I will take back control of my life, and I will never again be behold into the whim of a client. Well, as I’m happy to report, I was going to say as you can see but you can’t see me because this is radio, as I’m happy to report I am 100% healthy, I’m walking around, I’m moving, I have 2 beautiful children who I’ve fathered since that event. Everything works, and it’s important for me that you know that everything works.

I have fully recovered and I kept my bargain, I kept my end to that bargain. I changed everything from that point forward. I started my own business, I control my own destiny and I do not knock on doors to sell ever again. You don’t have too either. Our system the 60 second sale system puts you in control of the sales process and I’m going to tell you how that works. The second mistake, the second deadly sin that sales people make, that fake sales people make is that they are slow, the sales cycle is slow, the process is awful, and long sales cycles suck. I don’t want you to have to wait for your money, I don’t want you to have to wait to sell ever again.

Our systems beats it up and I’m going to show you how. We don’t knock on doors and we work fast, here’s how it works. We are invited in everywhere and I’m giving something a way there but we’ll get to that in a minute. You will go out as a sales professional as an entrepreneur, as a business leader and you’ll take the expertise you already have. Everyone’s in expert in something in your business you’re an expert and you’ll use that expertise to educate people. Once you go out and begin educating people, people view you differently they don’t think of you as a cold call pest banging on their door, they go to see you speak, they read the things that you write, they come up to you at networking events and they ask you questions and they tap into your expertise.

Once they realized that you’re this expert you’re magically transformed from an annoying intrusion into their day, into someone who has something a value for them. That makes it much quicker for people to do business with you, it shortens a sales cycle enormously. Here’s an example: 3 years ago I was invited to speak to a group of attorneys at the Litigation Counsel of America, this is the premier organization for attorneys who go to court. Like you see in lawn order, only not criminal court it’s civil cases. I’m invited to speak and they tell me that this is their complex commercial litigation institute, it is the top of the top employees in the field of litigation. They want me to come give a talk on how to sell when you’re a professional.

I said, I was happy to do that and they paid me very nicely to fly out to Las Vegas and spent 2 days with them, I gave a talk and then I did some 1 on 1 meeting with some of the attendees. As a result of giving that speech and all that speech was my friends was a promotional opportunity for me, it was an opportunity for me to connect with people and educate them on what I do, and demonstrating my expertise that was the opportunity I had. I gave them tremendous value, I gave them things they could take back to their offices immediately that would have an impact on their ability to make more money at the end of that 2-day period as I was going to the airport I had in my pocket over $200,000 in business commitments.

From a 2-day opportunity, the sales cycle in consulting is normally 18 months to 2 years. In 2 days I closed $200,000 worth of business simply by providing value and they invited me over to do it. We can do this with you as well. You don’t have to be slow. You don’t have to wait for the deal. The third deadly sin of selling is that you go out and you knock on doors of people who are not interested. We don’t do that fake sales people do it, free sales people are invited in. We sort our prospects by using education based marketing. We sort our prospects by using education based marketing. We provide value to everyone. The people who are interested raised their hand they invite us over, they invite us in to sell, we don’t have to knock on doors because we’re providing value to people.

They want us to help them and they’re there with their money in hand ready to give it to us. The fourth deadly sin is that fake sales people do not build relationships, they practice wham, bam, thank you ma’am sales, they are out throwing the bars like a casa nova looking for a 1 night stand. We don’t do that. We focus on long term relationships. I would rather educate you today and have you come back in 5 years with your money waiting to do business with me than make a quick deal now and never ever see you again. Why? Because we want a lifelong relationship because once, the most important thing our clients can give us is their trust.

The most important thing a client can give us is their trust and we will never ever take their money before they’ve given us their trust, because if they’ve given us their trust that means that we have the ability to provide them with value for the long term. If you think this does not apply to you let me give you some examples of industries where trust based selling our type of selling works. Private jets, how often do you think someone’s in the market for a private jet? I have a client who gets repeat business by selling private jets to fleet managers. Luxury automobiles, how often that someone buy a luxury automobile? Even if it’s every 3 years, or 5 years, or 10 years, and by the way that’s a same cycle as a private jet.

I have a client who gets 80% of his business as a repeat from repeat customers. If luxury jet sales can do it, if luxury automobiles can do it you can do it regardless of the industry you’re in. Wouldn’t it be great for you to make 80% of your customers repeat customers, so that you woke up and the first thing you thought about on January 1st of every year is, “I’m going to write down 80% of the number I did last year because I know those people are coming back.” That’s the fifth element. The fifth element is not only allows you to predict your income but you can also predict the increase that you’re going to get every year.

The fifth deadly sin is you never get to raise your rates because you’re always afraid that people are going to go away. In our system, you can command a fee premium because you’re an expert and you learn more with every client you deal with, and that additional knowledge allows you to provide additional value so you can command a fee premium, you don’t have to worry about price resistance because it goes away. When you’re a relationship based sales person, when you’re a trust based sales person you don’t have to worry about price. You wake up 80% of your business is already in the books and you know you can take a price increase any time because your expertise is that much more valuable with every passing day.

Once again, those 5 deadly sins, those 5 mistakes that fake sales people make, number 1 they have no control, number 2 they’re slow, the sales cycle takes too long, long sales cycle suck, we hate that. Number 3, they are out banging on doors they’re not invited in. Number 4, they don’t build relationships they’re in a wham bam thank you ma’am type sales opportunity or type sales mindset. We focus on relationships, 80% of your business comes from repeat clients. Then number 5, they can’t take a price increase, they are afraid of that price phone call, they’re afraid of being held hostage. You’d never have to worry about that in our system because you’re an expert, and your expertise grows each and every day.

If you’re a fake sales person and you’re out there right now and you want to become free, I need you to reach out to me and let me know you can reach out to me via email, that’s thelorenzo@dlorenzo.com. That’s thelorenzo@thelorenzo.com. Or you can hit me up on Twitter @thedavelorenzo@thedavelorenzo, Instagram, Facebook, same thing @thedavelorenzo, thedavelorenzo. I am the guy who helps you close lifelong relationships in 60 seconds or less and we’re here each and every single week.

All right, now, let’s open up the phone lines. Let’s reach out to a caller, I believe we have somebody on the line who wants to talks some sales. Nancy, who do we have out there?

Today we have Dustin, Dustin actually works in the music industry. He is an event coordinator and he wanted to talk to you today about how to amp up his business, how to get more people coming to his shows, and how to work a crowd.

All right, so Dustin welcome. Thanks for joining us on the 60-second sales show. How are you today?

I’m doing good. Thanks for having me.

All right, Dustin. Tell us a little bit about your job, tell us about what you do, and most importantly tell us why you do it? What gets you fired up to go to work every day?

I’m technically in 2 different jobs working with the same sort of thing, I’ve got 1 job where I am a booking agent for bands for our company. My second job is my own side project where I have, where I live right now I’m able to throw shows and I book my own bands and so on and so forth. Me, I get really passionate about music, I’m a musician myself, and learning the business behind, in creating a show has got me really fascinated and excited about things but I want to learn more. That’s where I am out right now.

That’s great, Dustin. You, you really do control your own destiny. You wake up every day knowing that no matter what you have the ability to take charge and make as much money as you want, right?

Absolutely. Totally.

All right …

I’m sorry to cut you off.

No.

There’s a couple little things involving that that I think I could work on and that’s why I’m giving the call, and yeah.

Tell us what’s on your mind, what do you need to change, what do you want to focus on, what do you want to improve in order that you can take charge of your business and your life?

All right, so first of all, the first job where I’m a booking agent, I have a lot of trouble, I shoot out a lot of emails to people and I pass their people back tack and I’m trying to set organization is 1 thing I need to practice, because I get emails from all over the place, I get the maybe’s, I get the no’s, and I need to figure out a best sort of system to keep myself in order. I’m always curious about how many times I should be sending out these emails to people. If I get a no, should I keep them coming? I’ve been told yes, I’ve been told no. What do you think?

I get it. Tell me a little bit about what are the email is all about? What do you sending out emails about? What’s your offer? What’s your pitch? Tell me what the emails are about?

I’ve got 2 clients and I’m in charge of booking world tours for them, and so I emailing and I’m in touch with lots of music venues and I’m trying to book these stores. There’s a certain order of things that I need to go through but right now I’m trying to find, I have a new clients that I need to get his first showed on figured out, but in order to do so I need somebody that’s going to be paying for his board and stay and his flight to wherever or so it is, and I would create the rest of his tour around that. I’m reaching out to a lot of music festivals. It’s been kind of a dead end in lots of places and I feel like maybe I’m expecting too much from that first call. That first gig. So that they have put, they have to fly them out.

Sure, absolutely. All right, so you’re out there now and you believe it’s 1 artist, or is it a band?

It’s just a single artist.

You believe in this artist, you like him and you think he provides a lot of value, correct?

Yes, totally.

Okay. What you’re telling me, by the way, Dustin, you’re doing everything exactly the way you should be doing if you want to be the cold call sales guy that I was describing in the beginning of our show today. You’re out there sending out emails instead of knocking on doors like I used to do all the time, you’re out there sending out these emails now and you really believe in what you have to offer, you know that this guy is good and I bet you’re thinking to yourself, and you tell me if I’m wrong, I bet you’re thinking to yourself, “If I could just get this guy in front of people they would be thrilled that they booked him.” Is that right?

Absolutely, he would sell himself, once they were able to experience it it would be a piece of cake.

All right. Couple of things, the first thing is that it’s going to be, I’m going to give it to you straight, Dustin, I’m not going to sugar coat it, it’s going to be really hard, I’m not going to say it’s impossible, it’s going to be really hard to pitch someone who provide such a visceral pleasure to people, it’s going to be really hard to pitch him over email because people can’t experience what you’ve experienced. They can’t get passionate about them because you really can’t convey that in an email. I’m not saying it’s impossible but if the odds of knocking on a door and selling a vacuum or 1 in a hundred the odds of you being successful with email selling an unknown artist like that probably 1 in 500 or 1 in a 1000, that’s just the straight scoop.

That’s a tricky thing about it. He’s not so much unknown but he’s more forgotten, he was really big 30 years ago. Nowadays it’s hard to get these festivals.

All right, but I’m going to tell you that can be something really great and the reason it can be really great is because if he was popular, even if it was 30 years ago those people aren’t dead, those people out there who really loved him at 1 point and there’s a bit of festival out there for everybody, right? I’m sure there’s a festival that caters to his type of music and there are people who would clamor to see him. I’m going to give you some thoughts on what you can do and it’s going to seem very odd because it’s not what you do. I want you to just give it a shot because if you give it a shot this could be the thing that could change everything for you and you don’t even have to get hit by a taxi.

What I’m going to tell you to do is I want you to take the expertise that you have, the expertise that you have Dustin is you know what it’s like to engage in audience because you have artists who engage in audience. Am I correct in that?

Absolutely.

I want you to start by putting together a report or a whitepaper on how to put on a festival that will engage your audience, get them to pay double what they normally would and have them come back year after year. That’s the paper I want you to write. You can put in there like 5 points for how to do exactly that, how to engage in audience, put on the festival that you can charge double for and we’ll keep your audience gladly coming back year after year. You can do a video it doesn’t have to be a paper necessarily it can also be a video or you can have someone interview you and do an audio program that you can send out. What we’re looking to do Dustin is we’re making you the expert on audience engagement. What you’re going to do is you’re going to offer promoters this report, this audio program, or this video for free in return for them giving you their contact information. You can do this, you can put it out on a website.

If you want to continue to do cold email selling, I’m not going to discourage you from doing that but your emails now will offer this free report. In my business I called this a honey pot, it’s an engagement device, you’re dangling it out there in front of them. Now, even the most grizzled promoter is going to say, “Who is this kid Dustin? He thinks he know something that I don’t know?” Then he’s going to read your report or he’s going to watch your video, especially if you’re an engaging guy a video would be great. He’s going to say, You know what? That third point that he said “I get it”, that guy knows what he’s talking about. After you send them this report, this video, this audio program you’re no longer selling something to them.

Now, you’re an expert on audience engagement. When you call them to follow up, you’re calling and you’re saying, “Hey, it’s Dustin. Just want to connect with you. I sent you my video on how to engage your audience, get them to pay double and keep them coming back year after year. What did you think? Did you like it? Do you have any questions for me?” The guy is going to say, “You know what Dustin, I really appreciate the fact that you sent that to me it was fantastic I’m going to use tip number 3.” Then you can say, “Great, glad you enjoyed it. And oh by the way, in case you ever need an artist I’m currently representing you’re going to give him the artist name and you’re going to say, man this guy absolutely blows the audience away, he’ll knock him on their asses, they’ll keep him coming back. If you ever need somebody like that let me know I’m happy to make them available to you.”

You see how the dynamic shifted there, Dustin?

Yeah, totally,

You’re no longer begging them to come in and pitch your guy. Now, you’re the expert they ask you for advice on how to engage an audience. Oh, by the way, I just happen to have this guy who fits the bill. You’ll go from 1 out of every 200t to everybody you get on the phone you have a 50/50 shot of getting your artist booked. I think this is something that I don’t think, I know this is something that transform my life the shift in mindset. Give it a shot, it’s something that will absolutely transform the way you’re going about what you’re doing, because you really are an expert in engagement of audiences. In audience engagement. I want you to leverage that expertise and your clients will benefit and that’s a very nice side benefit, by the way.

The side benefit is that, once you go through this with half a dozen artist or so, you’re going to get a reputation as the guy who people come to when they want great artist and then it will make it easier for you to attract artist and then you can really start to be selective as to who you, where you place them, and who you take on. Does that makes sense?

Yes, it does. Thank you.

All right, Dustin, thank you so much and thank you all for joining us. This is the 60-second sales show and Dave Lorenzo your host. I’m the guy who helps you close more deals faster, and I help you get home on time for dinner each and every single night. I want to thank our caller Dustin for a great question, and I also want to thank our producer Nancy Pop. You can find me Dave Lorenzo, right here at Davelorenzo.com, on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @thedavelorenzo. Until next week. Just hoping you make a great living and live a great life.

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In this episode, Dave talks about how to take your Frustrating Annoying Killing you Everyday sales process and transform it into a Fun Rewarding Easy and Engaging sales process. Here is the transcript: Hi there, In this episode, Dave talks about how to take your Frustrating Annoying Killing you Everyday sales process and transform it into a Fun Rewarding Easy and Engaging sales process.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript:<br /> <br /> Hi there, everyone and welcome to another edition of this 60-second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo, I'm your host and I'm the guy who helps you close more deals fast and helps you create lifelong relationships that not only add value to your clients, but also help you get home on time for dinner every single night.<br /> <br /> Today, we are talking about how to transform your sales process from a fake sales process into a free sales process. That's right, we're going to take your sales process and transform it from being frustrating, annoying, and killing you each and every single day. That's fake into a free process. Something that's fun, rewarding, engaging, and educational. I'm Dave Lorenzo and this process was developed not only to help you, but I'm a convert of my own system. This process is something that developed out of necessity. This process is, there's 5 real key elements to this process and there are 5 deadly sins, 5 mistakes I was making, and that's why I develop this process to help myself.<br /> <br /> My mission is to help transform your fake sales process just like my process was fake into a free sales process, 1 that you will embrace and enjoy every single day. Let me run down those 5 deadly sins that I was committing and hopefully help you transform your sales process from 1 that is frustrating, annoying, and killing you everyday into a 1 that is fun, rewarding, engaging, and educational. The first deadly sin that sales professionals make that entrepreneurs, that business leaders make, all the time is they give up control of the sales process, they give up control of the sales process, they're like a sailboat on the ocean just drifting at the mercy of the tide.<br /> <br /> You have the ability to control how much you make and when you make it, and you have the ability to control what you do with your life. Being able to sell, being a fantastic sales professional, being an entrepreneur who can sell, being a business leader who can help people for compensation because that's what selling is it's helping people for compensation, being able to do that gives you control of your life. I'll tell you my story, I'll tell you why this was so important to me in the hopes that will resonate with you.<br /> <br /> For my entire career, I did things the way you're doing them right now, I knocked on doors, I tried to help people. Most of them didn't want the help I could provide. They give me knocking on a hundred doors and getting 99 no's, but I lived for that 1 yes because I thought every time somebody rejects me I'm getting closer to a yes. My friends, that is a horrible way to go through life but that's what I did. I did it really, really well. The first business that I built from scratch, from zero was a hotel, it was a startup and that hotel did $5 million a year an annual revenue by the time I was finished and I recruited our corporate accounts myself.<br /> <br /> I was the general manager, I was on the road recruiting those accounts. The second business I built was a corporate housing brand for a large hospitality company. You may have heard of the Marriott Organization, I worked for them and I built their execu-stay brand in New York City, I took that from nothing to $50 million a year in 3 years and I did it by knocking on doors and convincing people to come and work with us. Imagine, 100 opportunities 99 no's. I knocked down every door I could at a sales team of 12, they knocked down every door they could.<br /> <br /> Then the third time I did this was a consulting company, the consulting company based in Manhattan did no business when I started, took them to over $200 million a year in annual revenue, knocked down doors the whole time and I'll tell you my friends that is a painful ... Dave Lorenzo clean 28:10
Forget Cold Calls: Be Invited To Sell – Every Time https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/29/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-8-forget-cold-calls/ Mon, 29 Aug 2016 16:00:08 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=543 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/29/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-8-forget-cold-calls/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/29/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-8-forget-cold-calls/feed/ 0 Forget Cold Calls: Be Invited To Sell - Every Time Welcome to another edition of the 60 second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo, I'm the guy who helps you make a great living and live a great life. Today we are going to focus on the one thing that every sales professional, every entrepreneur, every business leader thinks they have to do but they absolutely hate to do. We're going to focus on it because I'm going to give you permission to just forget about it. I'm talking about cold calling. The dreaded cold calling. Let me let me drop a number on you here. Let me give you a statistic. This statistic is according to salesforce.com and I think actually ... Leap job actually quoted it out most recently, only 2% of cold calls results in an appointment. Only 2%, so if you think about that for a minute you're a sales professional, you're at your desk, you're banging away on the phones, you make 100 phone calls, you get two appointments to get in front of someone who's a prospective client. If you're the best person on the planet at closing you're going to close half of those, so one out of every 100 cold calls you make where you connect with someone, only one of those results in a sale. Think about the time it takes for you to do the research to find out who good cold calling prospects are, think about the time it takes for you to sit down and bang away at the phones, all right. The time element of cold calling alone is daunting, even if you can set aside time element. Think about the frustration element of talking to 98 people who tell you, "No." Who tell you, "You suck." Who tell you to stop calling. The frustration element and that confidence crushing that you have to endure when you're a cold call sales person is incredible. But even if you can get past that, even if you can get past that time investment of making 100 calls to get two people to agree to see you. If you can get past the confidence crushing that it takes every time you here, "No, go away, stop calling me." If you can get past all of that, think about the ineffectiveness of going to a meeting of completing an appointment. If you do a webinar if that's where your initial appointments take place. If you're doing an in-person meeting, if it's a telephone sales appointment. Think about the uphill battle you face if someone has set that appointment for you via a cold call you walk in there and this person has no idea who you are, and you're starting from a completely and totally cold start. It's horrible. It's sucks, it's ineffective, and it's a huge waste of time. Yet just last week I went to see here in the in the Miami area, I live in Miami, here in the local area. I went to see someone who's known as a sales Guru. Someone who gets paid upwards of $10,000 for a speech on sales. Someone who's conducted live events where people paid $500 or more per person to go see her talk about how to sell, and had a close deals. I go to this event, I'm excited, I'm fired up, this is what I do. I love to engage people, I love to help people and stealing is helping, so I'm thinking, "I'm going to hear this Guru tell me something new. Something outstanding that I can use myself in my business to get in front of more people. To help more people."   I walk in the room, there's great music, there's fantastic energy, and the guru takes the stage and half of the 90-minute presentation was spent on cold calling techniques. Wow! I was crushed. I was so disappointed. The reason I was so disappointed my friends is because I could not believe that in this day and age, when there are so many ways to connect with people, and to show how your expertise can be valuable to people, this sales Guru, who by the way is probably ten years younger than me, should be hip to the way millennials do business. This sales guru is advocating getting on the phone, going through lists, dialing numbers over, and over, and over again. I was absolutely devastated. I didn't hear anything new about how to connect... Forget Cold Calls: Be Invited To Sell – Every Time

Welcome to another edition of the 60 second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo, I’m the guy who helps you make a great living and live a great life. Today we are going to focus on the one thing that every sales professional, every entrepreneur, every business leader thinks they have to do but they absolutely hate to do. We’re going to focus on it because I’m going to give you permission to just forget about it. I’m talking about cold calling. The dreaded cold calling.

Let me let me drop a number on you here. Let me give you a statistic. This statistic is according to salesforce.com and I think actually … Leap job actually quoted it out most recently, only 2% of cold calls results in an appointment. Only 2%, so if you think about that for a minute you’re a sales professional, you’re at your desk, you’re banging away on the phones, you make 100 phone calls, you get two appointments to get in front of someone who’s a prospective client. If you’re the best person on the planet at closing you’re going to close half of those, so one out of every 100 cold calls you make where you connect with someone, only one of those results in a sale. Think about the time it takes for you to do the research to find out who good cold calling prospects are, think about the time it takes for you to sit down and bang away at the phones, all right. The time element of cold calling alone is daunting, even if you can set aside time element. Think about the frustration element of talking to 98 people who tell you, “No.” Who tell you, “You suck.” Who tell you to stop calling.

The frustration element and that confidence crushing that you have to endure when you’re a cold call sales person is incredible. But even if you can get past that, even if you can get past that time investment of making 100 calls to get two people to agree to see you. If you can get past the confidence crushing that it takes every time you here, “No, go away, stop calling me.” If you can get past all of that, think about the ineffectiveness of going to a meeting of completing an appointment. If you do a webinar if that’s where your initial appointments take place. If you’re doing an in-person meeting, if it’s a telephone sales appointment. Think about the uphill battle you face if someone has set that appointment for you via a cold call you walk in there and this person has no idea who you are, and you’re starting from a completely and totally cold start.

It’s horrible. It’s sucks, it’s ineffective, and it’s a huge waste of time. Yet just last week I went to see here in the in the Miami area, I live in Miami, here in the local area. I went to see someone who’s known as a sales Guru. Someone who gets paid upwards of $10,000 for a speech on sales. Someone who’s conducted live events where people paid $500 or more per person to go see her talk about how to sell, and had a close deals. I go to this event, I’m excited, I’m fired up, this is what I do. I love to engage people, I love to help people and stealing is helping, so I’m thinking, “I’m going to hear this Guru tell me something new. Something outstanding that I can use myself in my business to get in front of more people. To help more people.”

 

I walk in the room, there’s great music, there’s fantastic energy, and the guru takes the stage and half of the 90-minute presentation was spent on cold calling techniques. Wow! I was crushed. I was so disappointed. The reason I was so disappointed my friends is because I could not believe that in this day and age, when there are so many ways to connect with people, and to show how your expertise can be valuable to people, this sales Guru, who by the way is probably ten years younger than me, should be hip to the way millennials do business. This sales guru is advocating getting on the phone, going through lists, dialing numbers over, and over, and over again. I was absolutely devastated. I didn’t hear anything new about how to connect with people.

What I’m going to share with you right now I think could absolutely change everything for you if you’re a sales professional. It could change everything for you if you’re an entrepreneur. It could change everything for you if you want to do business with new people you want to meet new people to do business with every week. Our approach in the 60-second sales process is for you to connect with folks, learn how you can help them, help them first, and then look to do business with them. That’s our approach, but meeting these people in the first place is what everyone is intimidated by. It’s what everybody comes to me and they say, “I just don’t know how to do it. You know, maybe I know 10 or 20 people and in the business world, I call them, I meet with them, and then I just don’t know what to do beyond that.”

Well, I’m going to give you the approach today. I’m giving you the solution today. This is what you can do so that you never ever have to cold call people again. The first thing that is critically important to get through your head, your mindset has to be one of an expert. You’re not a sales person any longer. I am now changing your role in your business. It doesn’t matter to me if you were brought in off the street as the guy that bang on doors and sell vacuum cleaners. You’re not a sales person any longer. You are an expert consultant who’s here to help people solve a problem. If you’re that vacuum cleaner salesman who goes out door-to-door, and sells things … Oh, and by the way, I give this example all the time, the vacuum cleaner sales person analogy, and people come up to me. I give this and live talks all the time, people come up to me and they say things like, “You know Dave, that was back in like the 1950s, nobody goes door-to-door selling vacuums anymore.”

I want to introduce you … At some point I’m going to introduce you all to a woman by the name of Tracy Parillo. Tracy works for Shangri-La hotels. She is the senior Vice President of sales. It’s an International hotel chain, she’s a senior Vice President of Sales. She and I worked together when I worked for Marriott, she was the top sales person in all of Marriott. When she and I worked together, I was the regional vice president. She worked with me, she started her career in sales selling vacuum cleaners door-to-door, okay? Today when we’re recording this is 2016, there’s somebody out there right now banging on doors selling vacuum cleaners, so don’t tell me that they only took place in the 50s. What they don’t do anymore is they don’t throw dirt on the floor and say, “Hey, let me show you how I can solve that problem,” but there’s somebody out there today selling vacuum cleaners door-to-door.

I don’t care if you sell vacuum cleaners. I want you to be the floor care and germ removal expert, not a vacuum cleaner sales person. Here’s what I’m getting at, you have to first educate your audience on the problems they have that your product or service can solve. People who raise their hands and say, “Hey, I’m interested in hearing more about that,” those are the people who I want you to connect with. Let’s take the 60-second sales process, the beginning part, and let’s walk through it as it relates to you being an expert, and you helping people solve a problem. You’re that vacuum cleaner sales person, you’re a young Tracy Parillo out there banging on doors, right? Better than banging on doors, better than cold calling, what you should be doing is you should be connecting with people who sell carpets.

People who sell carpets and install carpets to people’s homes. You should get names of people who just purchased carpets, and you should invite them to a seminar you’re conducting on allergens and how to prevent allergic reactions in children. How to prevent environmental allergies in children. You should connect with a local allergist, and you should do either a webinar, which is a great way to deliver this information, or you should do an in-person seminar. Where you and the local allergist talk about things that can live in a carpet that your vacuum cleaner will prevent, okay? You’re not going to talk about the vacuum cleaner at all in this seminar. You’re going to talk about things that can live in a carpet, and you’re going to talk about how homeowners who own carpets can remove those critters. The creepy crawlies, all the things, even things that don’t begin with the letter C.

You’re going to talk about how you can remove those allergens from your home with good vacuuming, and carpet care practices. You’re going to give these seminars all over the place. You’re going to run them constantly on the web, on your website, and you’re going to ask people to opt-in to receive this information. You’re going to create pamphlets and you’re going to send those pamphlets out, but before they get the information they have to give you their email address, their cell phone number, and their name. The people who respond by giving you the email address, their cell phone number, and their name, those are people who are good potential clients for your services.

The suspects are people who own carpet. Okay, you’re finding the suspect names from carpet stores. Shocking, I know. Carpet stores. The prospects are people who you invite to see the seminar, who you invite to receive the information. Those people who say, “Yes.” Those are prospects. They’re interested in removing allergens from their home because they have kids. There’s nothing more emotional than taking care of a family. There’s nothing more emotional than keeping your children safe, and free from harm. You are vacuum cleaner sales person, but you’re not anymore, I’ve made you an expert on removing allergens from your home. My friends if you can do this with a vacuum, if you can become an expert on solving a problem as a vacuum cleaner sales person, you can become an expert in any industry.

The key to removing cold calling from your life, the key to be getting rid of cold calling from your life forever is identifying the problems that you’re great at solving. Seizing the mantle of expertise, grabbing onto it and saying, “Yes, I am an expert in this,” and then going out and demonstrating to the world your ability to solve this problem. Your ability to educate people that the problem even exists, and offering an alternative, and that alternative is the product or service you sell. That’s it, you never have to ever cold call again. I don’t care if you’re a pharmaceutical sales rep. I don’t care if you sell vacuum cleaners, if you’re an expert, you’re a consultant, the problem that you solve is your area of expertise. You are a consultant, you help people solve those problems and you never after ever have to cold call again. People will come running to you for the solution to those problems.

2% of cold calls result in an appointment. Horrible, devastating rejection. Absolutely horrible waste of your time. Invest your time in developing educational material. Invest your time in developing fantastic content. Invest your time in focusing on being an expert, and seize the mantle of expertise. You want another example? You want another example from another industry where it’s very difficult? Let’s talk garbage. I don’t mean talking trash, well I do mean talking trash, but I don’t mean talking trash in the sports sense. You’re a person who works for a waste management company, you have to go out and convince people to put their garbage in your trash cans. You got to convince business owners to hire you to cart away the things they discard. Nobody wants to talk about trash, people are only concerned about what it costs to get rid of it. They want the absolute lowest price.

How do you combat that? The first thing you do is you go to the environmental groups that are in your area, and you see if you can either purchase or rent the lists of people who have signed up to be part of those environmental groups. People who are active. People who are concerned about the environment. When you find those lists, you cross-reference those list, and good list broker can do this for you. You cross-reference those lists with the local business owners. Business owners who are environmentally conscious. Then what you do is you do research on how the trash that you collect is disposed off, and you make sure your company has a hallmark for being the most the most environmentally friendly, the most sound trash disposal company.

Then you go out and you invite the business owners who are on the environmentally friendly lists, the environmentally active lists, to a seminar on how your company is the most … Well the a seminar is on environmentally conscious disposal of business waste, okay? During the presentation you educate people on good ways and bad ways to dispose of trash, and then you wait for them to ask how your company disposes of the trash. You are the obvious solution to those people. Now, a natural extension of that is you can canvass all the business owners and see which one [surface 00:14:12] that weren’t on environmentalist list. That’s fine, I think you should do that, but start with a low-hanging fruit. Start with the people who are really interested in being environmentally conscious. Help educate the community. You can enlist some of those people to help educate the community for you.

Here you go, trash, garbage, something that trash removal, trash disposal, waste disposal, something that everyone thinks is a commodity, all of a sudden you’ve turned yourself into an expert. You’ve turned yourself into a consultant, and you go out and educate people on how they can make a difference in their environment, and in their Community by working with you. Two examples I’ve just given you on how you can eliminate cold calling by educating people, getting them to come to you instead of you having a bang on doors. Trash and vacuum cleaners, two of the toughest things out there to sell. No matter what you’re selling you can do this.

Okay, now it’s the time in our show where we take a question, or we answer a caller … answer a call from a caller, and we talk about something that’s on the mind of a business owner. Today we are very fortunate, our very own producer Nancy Pop is starting a business, and she has a question for us. Nancy, tell us what your question is.

Hi Dave, my question today is that I’m starting an online business and looking for sponsors that are going to provide both financial and in-kind sponsorships. What is the best way for me to approach someone if I’m not too familiar with them personally?

Okay, so Nancy let’s get started by talk … tell me a little bit about the online business that you’re starting.

I’m starting what is essential a social media/content sharing network for local New York city-based film-makers, writers, musicians, and visual artists.

Wow, very, very exciting. Excellent. Okay, one more quick question, so who would be the ideal sponsor? Who’s the person that if I said to you, “Listen, you can have anybody you want,” who’s your dream sponsor to be a part of this project with you?

My dream sponsor probably would be some organization along the lines of the New York Arts Foundation, or Made in New York foundation. Someone that fully supports New York City based artists. On a smaller scale I would really love to work with local businesses that are family run, or small businesses that need some advertisement that can obviously benefit me, but I can benefit them in return.

Okay, so I applaud your effort for doing something that you’re passionate about. The more successful business startups are startups where the entrepreneur is passionate about the topic. Having known you now for … Well, we’ve been working together now for a couple of months, I know how passionate you are about art. Congratulations on taking this step to pursue something that you’re passionate about, because that energy is going to be critically important, and here is why. This is going to be really hard, and I hope that you’re prepared for the amount of effort that you’re going to have to put forth. The good news is that once you get the ball rolling it will become easier, and easier for you to attract sponsors. I know that you’re passionate about this and that passion is going to serve as your rocket fuel to keep you going when you get two, or three, or 20, or 30 “Nos”.

The first thing I think you should do is I think you should shoot for the moon. I want you to go out and I want you to look for the most powerful sponsor that you could find. A name that having that person, or that company involved will get people to sit back in their chair and go, “Wow! They’re sponsoring you?” Think for a minute Nancy about the names that would just knock you over. If I’m someone who supports the Arts, I’m philanthropic, who … what’s a business or a company that you could say to me, “Wow!” That you could say it was a sponsor and I would go, “Wow!” I’d be impressed that you were able to attract them. Who’s somebody like that? What business?

Somebody like that would probably be someone like the Sundance Film Festival, or Tribeca Film Festival. I think that would be a great way to bring on film-makers to the website.

Awesome. Okay, so Tribeca Film Festival, Sundance Film Festival, you say those and I think Robert DeNiro, Robert Redford, right? Those people getting their involvement or even just getting an endorsement from someone who’s a senior person in either of those organizations would go a long way toward opening doors for you. The first thing I would do is I would go out and make an emotional pitch to the people who are senior level people in those organizations. I would do research on who the senior level people are. How they got their start, and I would make an emotional pitch to them to connect with them and see if they would first go for the pot of gold. First ask them for $50,000, or however much money you need, right? First ask for money, and then the second thing you do is if you can’t get money you fall back to the position where you say, “I’d like an endorsement from you. I’d like to use your name to help me attract people.”

Let’s not focus on the second part, let’s focus on the first part. I’ll give you an example of how this works. When I wrote my first book ‘Career Intensity Business Strategy for Workplace Warriors and Entrepreneurs’, I wanted as many high-profile blurbs as I possibly could get. I didn’t take the time to do a book proposal, I didn’t have a big agent, I didn’t have a publisher, I wanted to get my book to market quickly. I wanted to sell it myself because I figured if I short cut the process, it normally takes about a year to even get your book in front of agents. It normally takes longer than that to get your book published. I had it written already, I wanted to self-publish, so I wanted as many good big name blurbs as I could get.

One person I really wanted to write a blurb for my book, and those of you don’t know a blurb is simply an endorsement of the book. One person I wanted to blurb my book was Seth Godin. Seth Godin is a marketing guru. This is 2006, so he’s had even more success in the last 10 years, but prior to that he was known as a guy who is great with online marketing. He was he was really a hot speaker at the time. He was doing all the big talks, so I wanted him to blurb my book. What I did was I put together an email packet that showed how I was using this book to bootstrap my business, and he had written a book called ‘Bootstrapping’ on how you as an entrepreneur could start a business with no money, no Capital, no connections. I tailored my pitch to him for the blurb exactly like the pitch that he outlined in ‘Bootstrapping’.

I said he was one of my idols, one of my mentors, I mean virtually. I made the pitch to him, he read it, and he responded back, “I don’t write endorsements for self-published books.” My response was simply, “Well, if you don’t do this for me then you won’t be following your own advice. I would prefer that you followed your own advice. I would love it if you followed your own advice and gave someone who is an entrepreneur bootstrapping a shot.” The next response I got was that he had read the book, and he wrote a very nice blurb for me. I used an emotional hook by figuring out what he was interested in, and by leveraging that to make the connection with him. Nancy, what I think you should do is target Sundance Film title, target Tribeca Film Festival. Look up who the senior executives are, and create that emotional pitch that will resonate with them.

Find out how they got started. Find out how they got into the business, and tailor your pitch for sponsorship in order to get a meeting. Tailor your pitch for that meeting based on those emotional triggers. It will really resonate with them, and it’s very hard for them to resist giving someone who’s just getting started the same way they got started a meeting. Then once you get them on board you can leverage that knowledge, you can leverage their connections, you can also leverage their name, and the power behind their brand to help you connect with other sponsors. How does that sound?

That sounds awesome. I didn’t even think of doing it that way.

Fantastic. Nancy, since we worked together on this, will you keep us informed from time to time as to how it’s going, so that not only we can benefit from your successes, but our listeners can also benefit from your successes and your journey along the way? Will you keep us informed as to what’s going on?

Of course.

Fantastic. All right folks, remember that people make decisions first by connecting on an emotional level with the person who’s sitting across the table from them, and then they justify those decisions with some of the rational elements. Our Focus today was on making connections with people, to avoid cold calling by educating people. By helping them understand the value you provide as a consultant. Remember, you’re not just a sales person, you’re a consultant helping them solve a problem.

If you’ve got a situation just like Nancy and you want some help with it, you can reach out to me on social media. You can find me on Twitter @vdavelorenzo. Also Facebook at V Dave Lorenzo. Instagram, Periscope, you name it, if you’re looking for me at V Dave Lorenzo. All the social media outlets, I will connect with you. I’ll answer your questions, either privately or here in this forum so that we can all learn. My thanks to Nancy Pop for her question and for her great job producing as always.

This is the 60-second sales show, I’m Dave Lorenzo and until next week, here’s hoping you make a great living, and live a great life.

Here are three additional podcasts to help you grow revenue and enjoy life:

Five Habits That Increase Your Income

You are a sum of your habits. Spend a few minutes with me and I will have you focused on the habits that boost sales and grow your business.

Pushy Salespeople Suck: I found a better way

This episode shows you how to help people for money.

Communicate More Often and Make More Money

Seems obvious right? Listen to this episode to discover how easily you can automate your communication and make more cash.

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Forget Cold Calls: Be Invited To Sell - Every Time Welcome to another edition of the 60 second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo, I'm the guy who helps you make a great living and live a great life. Today we are going to focus on the one thing that every ... Forget Cold Calls: Be Invited To Sell - Every Time<br /> <br /> Welcome to another edition of the 60 second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo, I'm the guy who helps you make a great living and live a great life. Today we are going to focus on the one thing that every sales professional, every entrepreneur, every business leader thinks they have to do but they absolutely hate to do. We're going to focus on it because I'm going to give you permission to just forget about it. I'm talking about cold calling. The dreaded cold calling.<br /> <br /> Let me let me drop a number on you here. Let me give you a statistic. This statistic is according to salesforce.com and I think actually ... Leap job actually quoted it out most recently, only 2% of cold calls results in an appointment. Only 2%, so if you think about that for a minute you're a sales professional, you're at your desk, you're banging away on the phones, you make 100 phone calls, you get two appointments to get in front of someone who's a prospective client. If you're the best person on the planet at closing you're going to close half of those, so one out of every 100 cold calls you make where you connect with someone, only one of those results in a sale. Think about the time it takes for you to do the research to find out who good cold calling prospects are, think about the time it takes for you to sit down and bang away at the phones, all right. The time element of cold calling alone is daunting, even if you can set aside time element. Think about the frustration element of talking to 98 people who tell you, "No." Who tell you, "You suck." Who tell you to stop calling.<br /> <br /> The frustration element and that confidence crushing that you have to endure when you're a cold call sales person is incredible. But even if you can get past that, even if you can get past that time investment of making 100 calls to get two people to agree to see you. If you can get past the confidence crushing that it takes every time you here, "No, go away, stop calling me." If you can get past all of that, think about the ineffectiveness of going to a meeting of completing an appointment. If you do a webinar if that's where your initial appointments take place. If you're doing an in-person meeting, if it's a telephone sales appointment. Think about the uphill battle you face if someone has set that appointment for you via a cold call you walk in there and this person has no idea who you are, and you're starting from a completely and totally cold start.<br /> <br /> It's horrible. It's sucks, it's ineffective, and it's a huge waste of time. Yet just last week I went to see here in the in the Miami area, I live in Miami, here in the local area. I went to see someone who's known as a sales Guru. Someone who gets paid upwards of $10,000 for a speech on sales. Someone who's conducted live events where people paid $500 or more per person to go see her talk about how to sell, and had a close deals. I go to this event, I'm excited, I'm fired up, this is what I do. I love to engage people, I love to help people and stealing is helping, so I'm thinking, "I'm going to hear this Guru tell me something new. Something outstanding that I can use myself in my business to get in front of more people. To help more people."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> I walk in the room, there's great music, there's fantastic energy, and the guru takes the stage and half of the 90-minute presentation was spent on cold calling techniques. Wow! I was crushed. I was so disappointed. The reason I was so disappointed my friends is because I could not believe that in this day and age, when there are so many ways to connect with people, and to show how your expertise can be valuable to people, this sales Guru, who by the way is probably ten years younger than me, should be hip to the way millennials do business. This sales guru is advocating getting on the phone, going through lists, dialing numbers over, and over, and over again. Dave Lorenzo clean 25:02
How to Sell When You Need Money Quickly https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/22/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-7/ Mon, 22 Aug 2016 16:00:30 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=506 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/22/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-7/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/22/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-7/feed/ 0 How to Sell When You Need Money Quickly Hi, everybody. Welcome to the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm Dave Lorenzo. Today's show is about the question that's on everybody's mind. That's right. I'm talking to you. Today's show is all about what to do when you need money quickly. At least, and this is absolutely no exaggeration, at least once a week, I get a phone call from someone who says, "I don't know what I'm going to do. I'm not sure how I'm going to make payroll. I need to get some money in the door. I need to get some revenue quickly." This happens in good times. It happens in bad times. It happens when the economy's booming. It happens when the economy's in the crapper. It happens in every industry. You can't imagine. Think of the hottest industry in the world right now. Think of the hottest industry on the planet. There is somebody out there right now going, "I don't know what I'm going to do. How am I going to get some money in the door?" Today, we're going to talk about what you can do when you need money quickly. I don't care if you're a business owner and you're facing payroll pressure. Very common. If you're a sales professional and there's somebody breathing down your neck to meet quota, "Got to get some money in the door quickly," if you're an independent professional, you're a lawyer, you're a CPA, you're an architect, you're a real estate agent and you got a wife who says, "Hey. The kids are going back to school. We got a tuition bill. We got to pay it in the next 2 weeks. What are you going to do?" I've got the answer for you today. I want you to know that this situation is so common that ... Let me give you, let me get into a story which really illustrates how bad something like this can be. Back in 2010, I got a phone call from an attorney in Upstate New York and the call went something like this. He said very calmly, "You know, Dave, I've been practicing for almost 30 years. My father practices with me. He's going to retire in 4 or 5 years, and for the last 30 plus years, we've had 1 big client and that big client is an automobile company and I'm a little concerned because I don't think we're going to get any work from that automobile company anymore." My first reaction is to obviously help the guy feel a little bit better. I said, "Well, I'm sure that's not the case. I'm sure you're doing great work. Tell me a little bit about the situation and either we'll find a silver lining for you or we'll look at it from a different perspective and see how we can turn this relationship into something that will be productive for the long term." He said, "Well, that would be great, but I'm not really sure we can." He said, "My client is General Motors, and on June 1st of last year," that would be June 1st, 2009, "they filed for bankruptcy protection. My job was to help defend them in a series of lawsuits that were filed against them and I've been defending them in this particular type of lawsuit forever. My father was defending them in this particular type of lawsuit forever before that. There are some nuances to the suit that make us uniquely suited," no pun intended, "to be the attorneys that would handle this."   I'm being a little vague in this area because I don't want to betray a confidence from this gentleman. He said, "But those lawsuits are no longer relevant because with the filing of the bankruptcy protection, General Motors, they're not going to be on the hook for big settlements because they don't have any money to pay. So the suits that were brought, most of them have been dismissed. The ones that were not dismissed are going to be either settled or they're just going to go away on their own, so I don't really know what we're going to do." I took a moment and I said, "I understand." Keep in mind, folks, this is 2010. I said, "Let's think about this. You know, what other clients do you have? What other type of work do you do?" He said, "No other clients. No other work." I said, How to Sell When You Need Money Quickly

Hi, everybody. Welcome to the 60 Second Sale Show. I’m Dave Lorenzo. Today’s show is about the question that’s on everybody’s mind. That’s right. I’m talking to you. Today’s show is all about what to do when you need money quickly. At least, and this is absolutely no exaggeration, at least once a week, I get a phone call from someone who says, “I don’t know what I’m going to do. I’m not sure how I’m going to make payroll. I need to get some money in the door. I need to get some revenue quickly.” This happens in good times. It happens in bad times. It happens when the economy’s booming. It happens when the economy’s in the crapper. It happens in every industry. You can’t imagine.

Think of the hottest industry in the world right now. Think of the hottest industry on the planet. There is somebody out there right now going, “I don’t know what I’m going to do. How am I going to get some money in the door?” Today, we’re going to talk about what you can do when you need money quickly. I don’t care if you’re a business owner and you’re facing payroll pressure. Very common. If you’re a sales professional and there’s somebody breathing down your neck to meet quota, “Got to get some money in the door quickly,” if you’re an independent professional, you’re a lawyer, you’re a CPA, you’re an architect, you’re a real estate agent and you got a wife who says, “Hey. The kids are going back to school. We got a tuition bill. We got to pay it in the next 2 weeks. What are you going to do?” I’ve got the answer for you today. I want you to know that this situation is so common that …

Let me give you, let me get into a story which really illustrates how bad something like this can be. Back in 2010, I got a phone call from an attorney in Upstate New York and the call went something like this. He said very calmly, “You know, Dave, I’ve been practicing for almost 30 years. My father practices with me. He’s going to retire in 4 or 5 years, and for the last 30 plus years, we’ve had 1 big client and that big client is an automobile company and I’m a little concerned because I don’t think we’re going to get any work from that automobile company anymore.” My first reaction is to obviously help the guy feel a little bit better.

I said, “Well, I’m sure that’s not the case. I’m sure you’re doing great work. Tell me a little bit about the situation and either we’ll find a silver lining for you or we’ll look at it from a different perspective and see how we can turn this relationship into something that will be productive for the long term.” He said, “Well, that would be great, but I’m not really sure we can.” He said, “My client is General Motors, and on June 1st of last year,” that would be June 1st, 2009, “they filed for bankruptcy protection. My job was to help defend them in a series of lawsuits that were filed against them and I’ve been defending them in this particular type of lawsuit forever. My father was defending them in this particular type of lawsuit forever before that. There are some nuances to the suit that make us uniquely suited,” no pun intended, “to be the attorneys that would handle this.”

 

I’m being a little vague in this area because I don’t want to betray a confidence from this gentleman. He said, “But those lawsuits are no longer relevant because with the filing of the bankruptcy protection, General Motors, they’re not going to be on the hook for big settlements because they don’t have any money to pay. So the suits that were brought, most of them have been dismissed. The ones that were not dismissed are going to be either settled or they’re just going to go away on their own, so I don’t really know what we’re going to do.” I took a moment and I said, “I understand.” Keep in mind, folks, this is 2010. I said, “Let’s think about this. You know, what other clients do you have? What other type of work do you do?” He said, “No other clients. No other work.”

I said, “You mean to tell me that you’ve only had 1 client?” He stopped me and he said, “I’ve 1 client for my entire 30 year career. That’s correct.” He said, “They’ve given us … At any one time, we’ve had over a dozen complex commercial litigation lawsuits. We’ve billed them hundreds of thousands, and some years, millions of dollars.” He said, “It’s myself, my father, a paralegal and a legal assistant.” He said, “I’m not sure what I’m going to do moving forward. These cases will dry up within the next 6 months.” The situation was pretty tough for this gentleman, but there was a silver lining that he had at least 6 months before he had to figure out what to do. Think about what he was facing. Think about this just for a minute. You’ve been doing something, the same thing, where you’ve had the same client, 1 client for 30 years, and all of a sudden, in what seems like the blink of an eye, it’s over.

The one way that you, and I’m laughing because if I wasn’t laughing at it, I’d be crying because it’s an emotional thing, the one way you feed your family, the way you make payroll, in a heartbeat it’s done. What do you do? I said, “The good news. The good news is we have 6 months to get some new business in the door and that’s actually great news because you have more time than a lot of people,” again, this is back in 2010, “you have a lot of time, more time than a lot of people who don’t know how they’re going to make payroll this week, who don’t know what they’re going to do to pay their kid’s tuition bill, who don’t know what they’re going to do to put food on the table next week. At least we’ve got 6 months, but that doesn’t make it any less important. We need to focus on something right now to get going.”

Let’s take the advice I gave him and you can put this into play right now to get more business in the door and it could be as quick as even this afternoon. Here’s what you do. The first thing I want you to do is I want you to get out a piece of paper and write down what you think makes you different from everyone else who does what you do. What makes you unique? What’s your competitive advantage? Then, I want you to begin calling. Start with your best clients and that’s the question I want you to ask them. “Mr. Client, what makes me different? Why have you chosen me? What is it about me and my company that you really like? Why do you enjoy working with us? Why do you continue to work with us?”

Write down all the answers. Write down all the answers you get, and then when you’ve done it with 15 people, with 15 different clients, I want you to start looking for a common thread. That will help you get an understanding for what really makes you different, for who you are in your business and why people choose to work with you. We are so close to our own businesses that we don’t realize what makes us special, what makes us different. We need to hear that from our clients. There’s a reason that I want you to do this. Find out what makes you different. Find out why people use you, and what makes you better than everybody else. After you do that, if you do that half a dozen times, you can explain to people why you’re doing it.

Say, “I’m launching a new initiative. I’m taking a new marketing approach. I’m really being aggressive with my sales process and I want to highlight what’s best about me. I want to highlight what’s best about my company and I want to really focus in on that while I’m talking to people about this new approach.” What will happen is, as you’re calling these 15 people, asking this question, they’re going to say, “Oh, that’s great. What’s your new approach?” You’re going to tell them, and you’re going to call everybody you know and you’re going to say, “I feel like I’m uniquely suited to provide value in a specific area” and then you’re going to tell them about the value you can provide for your clients in whatever you’re really great at.

You’ll get their feedback and I want you to go out and I want you to do this with everyone you know, everyone in your contacts database, all of your former clients, you’re going to call them up and you’re going to use our 60 second sales process. At the end of the 60 second sales process, you’re going to add your unique value proposition. You’re going to add the thing that makes you different. Let me role play it with you. You’re going through your contact database and you’re calling people you haven’t spoken with, let’s say in months or years. You’re going to call up and you’re going to go, “Hi. Joe, how are you doing? This is Dave.” Of course, you’re going to put your name in there. I’m using my name, Dave, because that’s my name. “Hi Joe, it’s Dave, Dave Lorenzo. How are you doing?” “Great.”

“I’m just calling to check in and see what’s going on in your business. It’s been a while since we’ve spoken. How are your kids? How’s Betty and how are the little ones?” “Oh, they’re 14 and 16. They’re not so little anymore.” “I guess you’re going to start to plan for college soon. What are you looking at?” “That’s terrific. So tell me about your business? How are things going?” “Oh, great.” “What are your plans for this year? What are you hoping to accomplish?” That’s the second question. “What are you hoping to accomplish this year? What are your goals?” “Ah, I see. Now, why is that important to you? You know, Joe, why is that important to you personally?” That’s the third question in the 60 second sales process. “Why are those goals, those business goals important to you personally?”

Then the fourth question. “Wow, that’s really interesting. Would you like some help achieving those goals?” Then that person will say, “Sure, I’d love some help. What does that look like? What do you mean?” Then you’ll either move into offering to introduce them to someone who can help them or offering help yourself. If it’s the first one and you offer to introduce them, “I happen to know Bob Smith. He does exactly what you’re looking for. Would you like me to make an introduction? I think he could really help you.” “Great, fantastic.” “Let me tell you a little bit about what I’m working on. I’ve just re-focused my sales efforts. I’ve got a new value proposition. Here’s what I’m doing. If you know anyone who’s interested in that, I’d appreciate you forwarding their information to me, you making an introduction, you connecting me, you referring them to me. That would really be helpful to me. Thank you so much.”

That’s the entire call right there. Each call may take 10 minutes. It may take 20 minutes, depending on the amount of time you’re going to spend on the line with them. Here’s the critical thing. You’re offering to help the other person first. That is the essence of the 60 Second Sale. It’s you going out to help other people achieve their goals. Now, I want you to do this process with everyone you know. That means you’re going to spend a lot of time on the phone. The first thing you’re going to do is you’re going to call your 5, your 10, your 15 best clients. You’re going to ask them what it is that you do differently, why they chose you, so you have a unique value proposition to offer at the end.

Then you’re going to get into these calls with everybody else you know, everyone in your contacts database. Even if you’re the least connected person in the world, you’re living in a cave somewhere and somehow you’ve managed to survive all these years, you must know at least 150, 200 people. I want you to get on the phone with everyone and I want you to have this conversation with everyone. I want you to offer to help first, using the script I just outlined. “How are you? What’s going on? Tell me a little bit about what’s happening in your business? What are your goals for this year? Why are those goals important to you personally, and would you like some help achieving those goals?”

Then you offer an introduction or you offer to help them yourself. Then, after you do that, after you do all that, you tell them what’s going on in your world, tell them about the unique value you can provide in the area that you discussed with your clients and then you ask them nicely and politely to introduce you to anyone they know who you think you could provide value to. Those calls are the most important thing you can do. If you get through the first 2 days of making these calls and you haven’t gotten at least a great lead that you can follow up on, you’re doing something wrong. This process, if you make 100 calls, will result in at least 2 or 3 new clients, 2 or 3 new pieces of business, 2 or 3 ways that you can get revenue in the door quickly. You will be amazed at how this works.

Here’s the thing I need you to caution you about. When we get into the place where we need money, our first reaction is to go, these days, is to go on the Internet, right, and we post stuff on Facebook or we’re on Twitter, ranting about how the deck is stacked against us. You can’t do that. You need to call everyone you know and stay off the Internet. I want a complete Internet blackout from you. I don’t want you on Facebook. That is a complete waste of your time during this process. I don’t want you to ever tell people that you’re desperate for money. I don’t want you to ever feel the need to express the desperation of your situation.

Talk to your wife. Talk to your husband. Talk to your significant other. Talk to your partner. Talk to someone you trust in your family about your feelings. Better yet, find a way to go out and get a shrink. Go get a psychiatrist. Talk to him or her. Do not share your neediness with the world, especially, neediness with the world, especially on social media. Do not, do not waste your time surfing the Internet looking for solutions out there. The solutions you need are right in your database. They’re right in your contacts file right now. Simply get on the phone and use that formula. If you need money now, get on the phone and use that formula with people you know. They will introduce you to the people who are going to be your next 2, 3, 4, 5 clients.

Now, here’s the other thing I need to caution you about. You’re going to get through this process and I had this happen to a client of mine just 2 months ago. They go through this process and within the fourth or fifth phone call, I think, they get a deal. They get business. What do they do? They celebrate. They go nuts, right, and they stop the process. [They’re 00:14:34], “Okay. That’s it. I got business. Here’s what I’m going to do. I’m just going to go and work on this and I’m not going to worry about business anymore.” Then what happens? In a month-and-a-half, guess what? They’re back in the same place they were.

Keep the process moving. Follow the process through all the way. Don’t quit after you get your first deal. Quit when you get through everybody on your list. Then when you get through everybody on your list, think about people they may know, and ask them for other names of people you can call. My friends, this is sales, this is selling. This is what you got to do. If you’re desperate for business, you need business now, get off the Internet and pick up the phone. Okay, now, it’s time for us to move into our mailbag segment. For that, I’d like to bring in our fantastic producer, Nancy [Pop 00:15:19]. Nancy’s got a question for us, I think, about … I don’t know. Nancy, what is our question about today?

Hey, Dave. Our question today is from Mike in Binghamton, New York. He said, “My business conversations always stray into politics. It’s who I am. How do I discuss politics, share my beliefs without offending people and losing business?”

Ah, thank you, Nancy. What a great question. We’re recording this during the time of the year when politics is really, really heated. If you’re listening to this years from now, who knows how this current election is going to play out? We’re recording this in early August 2016. As I was eating breakfast this morning, just flipping around the channels, every station is about scorched earth and how the Republicans and the Democrats are going at it and everything is just so negative. The thing that really strikes me is exactly what Mike was saying. Everybody’s got an opinion, right? Everybody’s got an opinion on this. The discussion about politics is one that we’ve always been warned to stay away from.

They say, “You shouldn’t talk about 3 things. You shouldn’t talk about sex. You shouldn’t talk about religion. You shouldn’t talk about politics.” You know what? If you don’t talk about those 3 things, your conversations are going to be pretty darn boring. I encourage everybody all the time, “Look, if you believe something and you feel really strongly or really passionately about it, get it out there. Just put it out in the open. Be respectful. Throw it out there and have productive discussions.” Now, I get what you’re saying, Mike. Those conversations can be polarizing. People may want to judge you but it’s all in how you phrase it.

When you discuss politics, what I want you to do is I want you to say, “Hey, I’m really interested in hearing points of view on,” and then throw the issue out. “I’m really interested to hearing points of view on the Supreme Court nominees. I’m wondering what you think about the fact that we have a vacancy in the Supreme Court now and it’s going to go almost a year being vacant. A lot of key decisions will not be able to be made. What are your thoughts on that?” and see what the person on the other side has to say. Then, be respectful but share your beliefs and don’t judge other people based upon what they believe. Keep in mind that you can work successfully with people who don’t share your political ideology, as long as you are aligned to achieve the same goals.

In my business, for example, I help people make more money quickly. I help people close deals quickly. I help Democrats. I help Republicans. I help people who couldn’t care less about politics. I help people who have not spent a day in their life thinking about politics or voting in an election. I help people who are absolutely opposed to my point of view on just about every issue. Why? Because I’m aligned. My passion is to help them. Always bring the conversation back to that point of commonality, the goal you share together and make sure you leave on that note. Make sure you leave on a note where, “Hey, listen. No matter what you believe or what I believe, I enjoyed hearing your thoughts, hearing your beliefs and we’re coming together to make sure that we achieve our goal of getting you new clients, that we achieve our goal of making sure that your company grows.”

Always bring it back to that point of commonality. Always tie it up nice and neatly with that. If you do so, you can share your point of view. You can share your politics. You can share your thoughts on religion, on sex, on anything else with everyone. The rules. Number 1, be respectful. Number 2, always listen, hear the other person out. Number 3, always finish up your conversation, bringing it back to that point of commonality, the common goal that you both share and everything will end on a high note. The one thing we need more of, regardless of where you live, what your political beliefs are, the one thing we need more of, we need more conversation.

We need more people sharing their beliefs coming together so that we have a mutual understanding of where people stand. As long as we listen to one another, we’ll be able to get along together, and the world will be a better place. Mike, thanks very much for your question. It’s particularly poignant this time of year and I hope I gave you the thoughts you were looking for. I hope you can bring that back home and make it useful. All right, folks. This has been the 60 Second Sale Show. I am Dave Lorenzo, and remember, you can send us your questions on Twitter. My Twitter handle is at thedavelorenzo, at T-H-E Dave Lorenzo, D-A-V-E L-O-R-E-N-Z-O. You can also find me on Facebook and Instagram with the same username. Until next week, I hope you make a great living and live a great life. We’ll see you soon.

Here are three other resources you can use to grow your bottom line:

Party Time is Selling Time

If people are coming over to your house to drink your booze and eat your food, you might as well try and sell them something.

Unleash the Awesome Power of the Referral Multiplier

Selling is easier when someone refers the prospective client to you. This is how you attract those referrals.

You Must Sell Yourself Every Day

This article will help you get what you deserve. Discover the easy way to sell yourself.

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How to Sell When You Need Money Quickly Hi, everybody. Welcome to the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm Dave Lorenzo. Today's show is about the question that's on everybody's mind. That's right. I'm talking to you. How to Sell When You Need Money Quickly<br /> <br /> Hi, everybody. Welcome to the 60 Second Sale Show. I'm Dave Lorenzo. Today's show is about the question that's on everybody's mind. That's right. I'm talking to you. Today's show is all about what to do when you need money quickly. At least, and this is absolutely no exaggeration, at least once a week, I get a phone call from someone who says, "I don't know what I'm going to do. I'm not sure how I'm going to make payroll. I need to get some money in the door. I need to get some revenue quickly." This happens in good times. It happens in bad times. It happens when the economy's booming. It happens when the economy's in the crapper. It happens in every industry. You can't imagine.<br /> <br /> Think of the hottest industry in the world right now. Think of the hottest industry on the planet. There is somebody out there right now going, "I don't know what I'm going to do. How am I going to get some money in the door?" Today, we're going to talk about what you can do when you need money quickly. I don't care if you're a business owner and you're facing payroll pressure. Very common. If you're a sales professional and there's somebody breathing down your neck to meet quota, "Got to get some money in the door quickly," if you're an independent professional, you're a lawyer, you're a CPA, you're an architect, you're a real estate agent and you got a wife who says, "Hey. The kids are going back to school. We got a tuition bill. We got to pay it in the next 2 weeks. What are you going to do?" I've got the answer for you today. I want you to know that this situation is so common that ...<br /> <br /> Let me give you, let me get into a story which really illustrates how bad something like this can be. Back in 2010, I got a phone call from an attorney in Upstate New York and the call went something like this. He said very calmly, "You know, Dave, I've been practicing for almost 30 years. My father practices with me. He's going to retire in 4 or 5 years, and for the last 30 plus years, we've had 1 big client and that big client is an automobile company and I'm a little concerned because I don't think we're going to get any work from that automobile company anymore." My first reaction is to obviously help the guy feel a little bit better.<br /> <br /> I said, "Well, I'm sure that's not the case. I'm sure you're doing great work. Tell me a little bit about the situation and either we'll find a silver lining for you or we'll look at it from a different perspective and see how we can turn this relationship into something that will be productive for the long term." He said, "Well, that would be great, but I'm not really sure we can." He said, "My client is General Motors, and on June 1st of last year," that would be June 1st, 2009, "they filed for bankruptcy protection. My job was to help defend them in a series of lawsuits that were filed against them and I've been defending them in this particular type of lawsuit forever. My father was defending them in this particular type of lawsuit forever before that. There are some nuances to the suit that make us uniquely suited," no pun intended, "to be the attorneys that would handle this."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> I'm being a little vague in this area because I don't want to betray a confidence from this gentleman. He said, "But those lawsuits are no longer relevant because with the filing of the bankruptcy protection, General Motors, they're not going to be on the hook for big settlements because they don't have any money to pay. So the suits that were brought, most of them have been dismissed. The ones that were not dismissed are going to be either settled or they're just going to go away on their own, so I don't really know what we're going to do." I took a moment and I said, "I understand." Keep in mind, folks, this is 2010. I said, "Let's think about this. You know, what other clients do you have? What other type of work do you do? Dave Lorenzo clean 20:19
Increase Sales With Communication Frequency https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/15/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-6-communication-business-vital/ Mon, 15 Aug 2016 13:00:55 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=455 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/15/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-6-communication-business-vital/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/15/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-6-communication-business-vital/feed/ 0 Increase sales with communication frequency. You don't communicate with your clients often enough.  That's why you don't sell as much as you should.  This episode of The 60 Second Sales Show outlines a way you can boost sales, immediately, by increasing your frequency of communication. Here is the transcript of this episode. Hey they're workplace warriors. Welcome to another edition of the sixty second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo and I'm your host. Today we're talking about the most important relationships in your life. That's right. We're talking about relationships you develop that can lead to long term business but our frame of reference for developing these relationships and the entire foundation that the sixty second sales process is built upon is a foundation of deep long lasting relationships that can be built through an external orientation. Through your focus on the person with whom you're doing business. I'd like you to picture for a moment the most important relationship in your life. Think of that significant other, that spouse, that partner, your life partner. The person that you count on the most, the person that you spend the most time with. I want you to think about that relationship and think about how frequently you communicate with that person and now think about whether your relationship would be better with more communication or worse with more frequent communication. In the back of your mind and maybe you've heard me say this before. In the back of your mind you may be kind of chuckling and saying honestly maybe my relationship would be better if we didn't see each other, if we didn't speak that often and frankly if your relationship would be better off if you didn't speak that often or if you didn't communicate that frequently, I'll tell you then maybe you need deeper counseling that I'm going to be able to give you here on the sixty second sales show. Seriously frequency of communication is the cornerstone of building a foundation of trust and that's what relationship based sales is all about. When we talk about selling something to someone it starts with a relationship. It starts with them and you having some sort of rapport. It starts with you both acting from a position of mutual interest not just self-interest. The entire sixty second sales process is built around you and the person with whom you are working connecting in that first sixty seconds and realizing that there is a foundation of a relationship here. Let me take you back to a time in my career when I first realized the power of relationship development through frequent communication. I was working almost exclusively with lawyers in 2010 and I had developed a database. I had developed a list of lawyers over the two years that I was really in this business actively, 2008, 2009. I had database of lawyers and they would receive an email from me on a regular basis. They were receiving an email from me each week. It was Wednesday at noon. I still deliver that email. I now deliver it to all sorts of business leaders not just lawyers but at the time it was called The Rainmaker Minute and that email was going out once a week. It was something that I started in February of 2009 and nine and I started it in response to the need for me to develop deeper relationships with people who had met me let's say at a speaking engagement or had kind of come to know me through reading an article that I had written or maybe just stumbled upon my website. All these folks had interacted with me one time and they wanted additional information from me so I started sending out this weekly email newsletter and I would educate people on business strategy, practice management, productivity improvement. Everything that they didn't teach lawyers in Law School I was covering in this weekly email newsletter. Around thanksgiving time in 2010 I had been doing the newsletter for almost two years. The weekly email newsletter. It was going out almost two years. Increase sales with communication frequency.

You don’t communicate with your clients often enough.  That’s why you don’t sell as much as you should.  This episode of The 60 Second Sales Show outlines a way you can boost sales, immediately, by increasing your frequency of communication.

Here is the transcript of this episode.

Hey they’re workplace warriors. Welcome to another edition of the sixty second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo and I’m your host. Today we’re talking about the most important relationships in your life. That’s right. We’re talking about relationships you develop that can lead to long term business but our frame of reference for developing these relationships and the entire foundation that the sixty second sales process is built upon is a foundation of deep long lasting relationships that can be built through an external orientation. Through your focus on the person with whom you’re doing business. I’d like you to picture for a moment the most important relationship in your life. Think of that significant other, that spouse, that partner, your life partner. The person that you count on the most, the person that you spend the most time with. I want you to think about that relationship and think about how frequently you communicate with that person and now think about whether your relationship would be better with more communication or worse with more frequent communication.

In the back of your mind and maybe you’ve heard me say this before. In the back of your mind you may be kind of chuckling and saying honestly maybe my relationship would be better if we didn’t see each other, if we didn’t speak that often and frankly if your relationship would be better off if you didn’t speak that often or if you didn’t communicate that frequently, I’ll tell you then maybe you need deeper counseling that I’m going to be able to give you here on the sixty second sales show. Seriously frequency of communication is the cornerstone of building a foundation of trust and that’s what relationship based sales is all about. When we talk about selling something to someone it starts with a relationship. It starts with them and you having some sort of rapport. It starts with you both acting from a position of mutual interest not just self-interest. The entire sixty second sales process is built around you and the person with whom you are working connecting in that first sixty seconds and realizing that there is a foundation of a relationship here.

Let me take you back to a time in my career when I first realized the power of relationship development through frequent communication. I was working almost exclusively with lawyers in 2010 and I had developed a database. I had developed a list of lawyers over the two years that I was really in this business actively, 2008, 2009. I had database of lawyers and they would receive an email from me on a regular basis. They were receiving an email from me each week. It was Wednesday at noon. I still deliver that email. I now deliver it to all sorts of business leaders not just lawyers but at the time it was called The Rainmaker Minute and that email was going out once a week. It was something that I started in February of 2009 and nine and I started it in response to the need for me to develop deeper relationships with people who had met me let’s say at a speaking engagement or had kind of come to know me through reading an article that I had written or maybe just stumbled upon my website.

All these folks had interacted with me one time and they wanted additional information from me so I started sending out this weekly email newsletter and I would educate people on business strategy, practice management, productivity improvement. Everything that they didn’t teach lawyers in Law School I was covering in this weekly email newsletter. Around thanksgiving time in 2010 I had been doing the newsletter for almost two years. The weekly email newsletter. It was going out almost two years. Around thanksgiving time in 2010 I received an email from one of the readers of the newsletter. Someone who I didn’t know, someone who had stumbled upon my website and subscribed to it and the email said, “My husband is the leader of a small group of lawyers that gets together once a year. They need a speaker on business strategy and marketing. Would you be willing to do this?” I replied back absolutely I speak to groups all the time. Let me know what I can do to discuss this opportunity with you. Let me know how I can discuss this opportunity with you.

Well, I immediately received a phone call from this woman’s husband like within … I want to say two minutes of sending that email the lady’s husband called me and we had a very nice conversation. He told me about the group and he invited me to send a proposal and I said well I don’t really send proposals here’s what I charge for speaking engagements, here’s what I’d be willing to do, how does this meet with your expectations? I had to make some modifications and customize the engagement for him but we agreed in principle to a deal on the phone. I sent him a letter outlining that deal and within forty-eight hours I had been booked to speak at this event which was in the following February, so February 2011. This all came about from a simple weekly email newsletter that I had sent out that the woman’s wife had read.

You might be thinking to yourself okay Dave I see the value for you as a professional speaker and as someone who’s a consultant in sales. I see the value in sending out this newsletter, you’ve got a speaking engagement out of it that’s great. I know what you’re thinking, you’re thinking to yourself Dave you probably wrote that newsletter at the time for two years, every Wednesday you were sending it out it probably took you two hours to write. Even if it only took you an hour to write you’re putting over one hundred hours and you’ve got a speaking engagement. Well that’s true. I’m telling you a story of how I booked one speaking engagement from it, but let me continue the story. It turns out that the gentleman who booked me to speak was a senior partner in the largest law firm in the country, Gibson Dunn and he was the head of the litigation Council of America. The litigation Council of America had a sub group called the complex commercial litigation Institute and that’s who booked me to speak.

I received a fee for that speaking engagement but I also developed business with a few of their members afterwards. That one speaking engagement was worth over two hundred thousand dollars in business to me. Now I want you to think about if that’s the only thing I had booked for two years of communicating with my list of folks with frequency, so if I had invested one hundred four hours to get that two hundred thousand dollars plus worth of the business … By the way I still do business with some people who were in that room so it’s way more than that now. If that’s all I had gotten from this, would it have been worth it? The answer is unequivocally yes. Absolutely it was worth me investing the time and doing that newsletter but I feel like an infomercial, but wait there’s more. That’s not the only piece of business I’ve ever gotten. In fact I receive eighty to ninety percent of my business. I’m not exaggerating, from people who have been in my database who receive my weekly email newsletter. What’s the point? The point is that frequency of communication helps to build trust. Frequency of communication helps to build trust and that trust is the foundation of your relationship. That’s what leads to the long term business that you’re going to do with folks.

Those of you who are out there in the in the sales world here’s what I want you to do. I don’t care what you sell, I don’t care what your product or service is, when you meet someone. I want you to connect with them and I want you to send them an email as a follow up and say it was a pleasure meeting you. Each week I communicate with the folks who are most important to me and I send them a weekly email newsletter. This newsletter is designed to educate, inform, and entertain. I’d like to put you on the list you can unsubscribe at any time. I hope you find it valuable and I welcome your feedback. That’s the email you’re going to send out. I don’t care if you sell copiers or you sell jet planes, this strategy is something that I practice and it’s something that I teach my clients and it works extremely well. The reason is because people we communicate with develop a bond with us and they expect that communication over time but more importantly that communication builds trust.

I’m going to give you right now the keys to developing trust by using this powerfully phenomenal tool, the weekly email newsletter. I’m going to give you three areas to focus on. The first area are the topics that you’re going to write about. Let’s say that you’re a car mechanic. You own an auto body repair shop. People coming to you for oil changes, they’re coming to you for tune-ups, they’re coming to you for major repairs on their car. When they come in to you obviously get their contact information. I want you to start writing a weekly email newsletter and I want you to educate people on things that are going on with their car. Again I’m inside your head I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking people don’t want to hear about car issues every single week and that’s fine. You’re a member of the community as a car mechanic you’re a powerful important member of the community. Everybody needs a service you have at one time or another. You’re going to write about things that are going on in the community, you’re going to inform. Once every four or five weeks you’re going to educate on a car topic and you’re always going to entertain.

You’re going to occasionally use humor. You’re going to occasionally include a video in there that may show people something that you’re working on or maybe kids playing baseball or you discussing the local Little League standings. The topic can be varied as long as you educate, inform, and entertain. Now let’s talk about the tone of this weekly email newsletter you’re going to send out. The tone is conversational. When people read it I want them to feel like they’re having a conversation with a friend. When you write you should write it in a familiar way. Forget about everything you were taught in your composition class in grammar school. Forget about how you were graded on your essays in high school and especially if you went to college you have to throw out everything they taught you about writing in college. Write the way you speak. I’m having a conversation with you right now on this podcast, that’s exactly the way you should be writing your newsletter, your weekly email newsletter.

Now let’s talk about the timing. Why do I like Weekly? Why am harping on weekly? Well this day in age we’re in a social media dominated world. I want you to think about how often you check social media. Many of us check social media multiple times a day. You’re on let’s say Facebook or Twitter multiple times a day and you’re actually having asynchronous conversations. Somebody is writing something to you, you see it you respond you write something back, you check later. There’s a whole dating world. There’s a whole group of people that are participating in the dating world using this type of communication now. All these dating sites people send messages back and forth and those are taking the place of real conversations before people actually meet. That’s multiple times a day and that’s how relationships are developed.

Now think about how often you enter into let’s say discussion forums. I belong to a discussion forum for consultants run by my mentor. A gentleman by the name of Alan Weiss and the forum contains fantastic topics that help me grow my business that educate me that focus me on my professional development as well as my personal development and I visit that forum multiple times a week to see what people have to say and to communicate with people. I’m sure you do the same with your industry, your profession. I’m sure you sharpen the saw multiple times a week in some way.

Now I want you to think about houses of worship or religious services. People who are religious go to services at least once a week or multiple times a month. You communicate with your community, you connect with your community multiple times a month. The point is this frequency it builds a sense of community, it lays the foundation for relationships. In your business I’d like you to take the time to communicate with the most important people to you. Your clients, your prospective clients. I’d like to take the time to communicate with them once so week In a way that’s meaningful and powerful. There you have your topic, your tone, and your timing.

A lot of people ask me questions about the delivery. They want to know the technical aspects of this and quite frankly the delivery so simple. Go to one of these services that are available right now. Constant contact, Icontact, Mail Chimp, Awebber, there are a whole host of email service providers. They have templates. Drop your information into that template once a week and upload your list, set a day and a time for it to go out. The day and the time is unimportant as long as it’s consistent and you’re off to the races. You’re often running and you’re communicating with your most important folks in your business life each and every single week.

I do have a confession to make about this. Some people are going to unsubscribe and that may hurt your feelings. It doesn’t matter. The people who unsubscribe are not going to be long term clients of yours anyway or if they weren’t reading it it’s better for you not to think that they’re out there and maybe will do business with you at some point. People who unsubscribe are fine let them go. Yes there are some people who will respond with nasty things. People sometimes have a visceral reaction to getting information in their inbox that says more about them than it says about you, don’t worry about it. This is one of the most important strategies that I teach. Communicate with your clients and your prospective clients each and every single week. If you do this and you give it three months you will find out how powerful it can be within ninety days. That’s twelve weekly news letters. You will start to see some results. I promise you this will be one of the most powerful things you do to boost your sales.

Now it’s time for us to turn to our mailbag. It’s time for our mailbag segment and today I’m thrilled that we actually have a question from Facebook. We got a question from one of the viewers of my Facebook live videos. I’m doing a Facebook live video every day. We just set the time for it every day at 3:00 eastern time. Visit me on Facebook @_the_DaveLorenzo. That’s @_the_Dave Lorenzo that’s my business profile page and once a day at 3 pm eastern time I’m live. You can chat with me on Facebook. We cover a topic and usually in about ten minutes or less it’s usually a lot less than ten minutes and we talk about things that will boost your sales. We talk about the sixty second sales process. Today’s question comes from a gentleman by the name of Adam and Adam asks … I want to read it to make sure I get it right. Adam asks, “How do I sell something nobody needs? How do I approach people who don’t know they need my services and offer my services to them?”

Well the first thing I have to say Adam is you shouldn’t be selling something that nobody needs to somebody who doesn’t need it. The questions I have for you before I give you the answer. Number one: Do you make a difference in the lives or the businesses of the people that you work with? Do you make a difference in the lives or the businesses of the people that you work with? If the answer is yes we can move on. Question number two: Are you exchanging fair value for the compensation you’re being paid? Are you exchanging fair value for the compensation you’re being paid? If the answer is yes, we can move on. Question three? Do you have a passion for whatever it is you’re selling? Do you have a passion for whatever it is you’re selling? If the answer is yes then I can give you the answer to this question, but if you answered no to any of those three questions then quite frankly we need to have you move to a different product or service that you can sell where the answers to those three questions are yes.

Do you make a difference in the lives or businesses of the people that you work with? Are you exchanging fair value for the compensation you receive and do you have a passion for what you’re selling? If the answer is yes to those three questions then my friend I can tell you that the people that you’re speaking with need your products or services, but before you ever sell anything to anyone you should find out what’s going on in their business, find out what’s going on in their life and find out what their biggest challenge is and help them or at least try to help them solve that challenge. I’m going to say that again because it’s really important. Before you sell anything to anybody ever you should find out what’s going on in their life, find out what’s going on their business, ask what their biggest challenge is, what they’re currently facing and see if you can help them solve that problem. Introduce them to someone who can make things a little better. Offer them a direct solution, see if there’s a way you can help them solve their biggest challenge first then you can talk about your product or your service.

Why do we do this? This is the essence of the sixty seconds sale. The sixty second sale is you essentially selling yourself to the person as someone who cares about them. That’s the sixty second sale. If you can do that within the first minute then you’ve earned the right to talk about how your product or service can make their life or their business better even if it’s unrelated to whatever their biggest challenge is because you’ve offered to help take away their biggest challenge, to help take away their pain essentially on something else first. You’ve demonstrated that you care. You’ve laid a foundation of trust first, then you can sell them something that you have to offer. That’s how you get into a sales conversation with someone who doesn’t need what you have, but if you have a solution you believe in and you’re sitting across the table from someone who you believe you can help with your product or service then that person is really someone who needs what you have. That resetting of our mindset is so important. That’s what you need to do before you approach anyone from a sales perspective.

Adam thank you so much for your question. I sincerely appreciate it. Those of you who would like to interact with us or ask me a question again you can reach out to me on Facebook @the_DaveLorenzo on Twitter same handle @theDaveLorenzo and also you can find me of course on Instagram where we post a great sales quote every day and one minute videos to engage inform and entertain you. My Instagram handle is the same as the other two @the Dave Lorenzo. This is the sixty second sales show. Again I thank you for joining us and I look forward to speaking with you right back here next week. Make sure you join us on iTunes. The sixty second sales show I’m Dave Lorenzo and until next week I hope you make a great living and live a great life.

Here are some additional resources you can use to increase sales:

Get Serious About Sales

Selling in not something you do only when you need money.  You need to sell all the time. This article will help you get serious.

Answer These Questions and Predict Your Selling Future

If you want to look into the future and see your potential, answer these questions.

Speak Well and Sell Well

If you want to sell well, you should learn to become an excellent public speaker.  Speaking is a great way to attract qualified clients.

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Increase sales with communication frequency. You don't communicate with your clients often enough.  That's why you don't sell as much as you should.  This episode of The 60 Second Sales Show outlines a way you can boost sales, immediately, Increase sales with communication frequency.<br /> <br /> You don't communicate with your clients often enough.  That's why you don't sell as much as you should.  This episode of The 60 Second Sales Show outlines a way you can boost sales, immediately, by increasing your frequency of communication.<br /> <br /> Here is the transcript of this episode.<br /> <br /> Hey they're workplace warriors. Welcome to another edition of the sixty second sales show. I am Dave Lorenzo and I'm your host. Today we're talking about the most important relationships in your life. That's right. We're talking about relationships you develop that can lead to long term business but our frame of reference for developing these relationships and the entire foundation that the sixty second sales process is built upon is a foundation of deep long lasting relationships that can be built through an external orientation. Through your focus on the person with whom you're doing business. I'd like you to picture for a moment the most important relationship in your life. Think of that significant other, that spouse, that partner, your life partner. The person that you count on the most, the person that you spend the most time with. I want you to think about that relationship and think about how frequently you communicate with that person and now think about whether your relationship would be better with more communication or worse with more frequent communication.<br /> <br /> In the back of your mind and maybe you've heard me say this before. In the back of your mind you may be kind of chuckling and saying honestly maybe my relationship would be better if we didn't see each other, if we didn't speak that often and frankly if your relationship would be better off if you didn't speak that often or if you didn't communicate that frequently, I'll tell you then maybe you need deeper counseling that I'm going to be able to give you here on the sixty second sales show. Seriously frequency of communication is the cornerstone of building a foundation of trust and that's what relationship based sales is all about. When we talk about selling something to someone it starts with a relationship. It starts with them and you having some sort of rapport. It starts with you both acting from a position of mutual interest not just self-interest. The entire sixty second sales process is built around you and the person with whom you are working connecting in that first sixty seconds and realizing that there is a foundation of a relationship here.<br /> <br /> Let me take you back to a time in my career when I first realized the power of relationship development through frequent communication. I was working almost exclusively with lawyers in 2010 and I had developed a database. I had developed a list of lawyers over the two years that I was really in this business actively, 2008, 2009. I had database of lawyers and they would receive an email from me on a regular basis. They were receiving an email from me each week. It was Wednesday at noon. I still deliver that email. I now deliver it to all sorts of business leaders not just lawyers but at the time it was called The Rainmaker Minute and that email was going out once a week. It was something that I started in February of 2009 and nine and I started it in response to the need for me to develop deeper relationships with people who had met me let's say at a speaking engagement or had kind of come to know me through reading an article that I had written or maybe just stumbled upon my website.<br /> <br /> All these folks had interacted with me one time and they wanted additional information from me so I started sending out this weekly email newsletter and I would educate people on business strategy, practice management, productivity improvement. Everything that they didn't teach lawyers in Law School I was covering in this weekly email newsletter. Around thanksgiving time in 2010 I had been doing the newsletter for almost two years.... Dave Lorenzo clean 21:04
Pushy Salespeople Suck: I Found a Better Way https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/08/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-5/ Mon, 08 Aug 2016 13:00:57 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=353 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/08/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-5/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/08/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-5/feed/ 0 Pushy salespeople suck. In this episode of the 60 second sales show you hear how I discovered a better way. Welcome everyone to another edition of The 60 Second Sale Show. This is Dave Lorenzo, and I’m the guy who helps you close more deals fast. Today, I’m going to start off with kind of a confession actually. It really is a confession. I've been thinking a lot about you and what you're facing from a sales perspective, and I wanted to share with you one of the stories that has really shaped my approach to sales over the years. The confession is that, when I first started using this approach, actually how I first started using this approach to sales, it came about really out of the intimidation I felt related to sales and selling. You heard that right. I was absolutely intimated to walk into the office of some senior level executive and offered to help him or his company build and grow their business. It seems, I guess, a little, maybe a lot surprising to those of you who know me well, because I go in now and I'm like a steamroller, I'm happy to walk into any executive's office at any time and I just start having a conversation. I guess maybe I should preface it by saying I don't steamroll over people, I steamroll into the office, and then I use the approach we're going to discuss, but at the time when I first started developing this relationship based sales approach, I was a guy who thought that sales was, well, for lack of a better word, show up and throw up type opportunity. Here's the story that really changed the way I think about things. I had developed a business for Marriott. I was probably, if I think back I can give you the exact math. It was probably 20, no 18 years, 18 years into my career, and I had developed a $50 million a year annual revenue business for Marriott. I did that by selling corporate housing. I was the GM, I was the executive VP of the brand, but I sold every day because that's who I am. I was selling corporate housing to large companies, to a lot of financial services companies: Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sachs, Bear Stearns, Cantor Fitzgerald, all of the large financial services companies who would place executives on a temporary basis, at least 30 days, but most the time I was for 3 to 6 months. I was doing this in New York City, which is a very fast-paced environment. Well, that sales approach was one where I would walk into an executive who handled relocation, usually it was a human resource executive, and I would do a presentation. I would spout off features and benefits, and the executive would either think they were valuable or he wouldn't. Most the time, because I was successful, he would think they were valuable. To be frank, I was selling a Marriott product which was a very high quality product and had a huge successful brand behind me. They would either agree to work with us or they wouldn't. The sales process was very straightforward. Like I said, it was a show up and throw up sales process. When I ended up leaving that role when I was recruited to join the Gallup organization to start up their business in Manhattan, I had to change my approach. The reason I had to change my approach came from this specific incident. I worked with a partner when I first started at Gallup, and my partner was a phenomenal relationship oriented guy. His role, I guess, would be considered an inside sales role these days. He would call people on the phone and he would set appointments for me to go in and talk about our consulting services. My approach when I first began was one where I figured I would just go in and say, "Hey, I'm Dave. I'm here from Gallup. Here is the latest thing we've come up with you need it in your company. What do you think?" Typical show up and throw up sales process. I would go in there, talk about features and benefits, and apply the features and benefits to the client's sales organization. That's what I thought selling was all about, Pushy salespeople suck. In this episode of the 60 second sales show you hear how I discovered a better way.

Welcome everyone to another edition of The 60 Second Sale Show. This is Dave Lorenzo, and I’m the guy who helps you close more deals fast. Today, I’m going to start off with kind of a confession actually. It really is a confession. I’ve been thinking a lot about you and what you’re facing from a sales perspective, and I wanted to share with you one of the stories that has really shaped my approach to sales over the years. The confession is that, when I first started using this approach, actually how I first started using this approach to sales, it came about really out of the intimidation I felt related to sales and selling. You heard that right. I was absolutely intimated to walk into the office of some senior level executive and offered to help him or his company build and grow their business.

It seems, I guess, a little, maybe a lot surprising to those of you who know me well, because I go in now and I’m like a steamroller, I’m happy to walk into any executive’s office at any time and I just start having a conversation. I guess maybe I should preface it by saying I don’t steamroll over people, I steamroll into the office, and then I use the approach we’re going to discuss, but at the time when I first started developing this relationship based sales approach, I was a guy who thought that sales was, well, for lack of a better word, show up and throw up type opportunity.

Here’s the story that really changed the way I think about things. I had developed a business for Marriott. I was probably, if I think back I can give you the exact math. It was probably 20, no 18 years, 18 years into my career, and I had developed a $50 million a year annual revenue business for Marriott. I did that by selling corporate housing. I was the GM, I was the executive VP of the brand, but I sold every day because that’s who I am. I was selling corporate housing to large companies, to a lot of financial services companies: Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sachs, Bear Stearns, Cantor Fitzgerald, all of the large financial services companies who would place executives on a temporary basis, at least 30 days, but most the time I was for 3 to 6 months. I was doing this in New York City, which is a very fast-paced environment.

Well, that sales approach was one where I would walk into an executive who handled relocation, usually it was a human resource executive, and I would do a presentation. I would spout off features and benefits, and the executive would either think they were valuable or he wouldn’t. Most the time, because I was successful, he would think they were valuable. To be frank, I was selling a Marriott product which was a very high quality product and had a huge successful brand behind me. They would either agree to work with us or they wouldn’t.

The sales process was very straightforward. Like I said, it was a show up and throw up sales process. When I ended up leaving that role when I was recruited to join the Gallup organization to start up their business in Manhattan, I had to change my approach. The reason I had to change my approach came from this specific incident. I worked with a partner when I first started at Gallup, and my partner was a phenomenal relationship oriented guy. His role, I guess, would be considered an inside sales role these days. He would call people on the phone and he would set appointments for me to go in and talk about our consulting services.

My approach when I first began was one where I figured I would just go in and say, “Hey, I’m Dave. I’m here from Gallup. Here is the latest thing we’ve come up with you need it in your company. What do you think?” Typical show up and throw up sales process. I would go in there, talk about features and benefits, and apply the features and benefits to the client’s sales organization. That’s what I thought selling was all about, particularly when it came to consulting services.

My partner James would go out, and he will go on the phone and set up all of these meetings for me. Our area of influence are, I guess, you could call it a territory, our territory covered the entire Northeast. I had a team of consultants ready, willing and able to help people. They were counting on me, so every day they would send me off into the field and I would try and go find some business. One particular day, James had set up 3 appointments for me in Boston. I took the 5:30am shuttle from LaGuardia Airport up to Boston Logan Airport. James picks me up in his car and we go on some appointments, and I’m doing my thing. I walk in and I have a PowerPoint presentation deck ready to go. I set up my projector in 5 minutes and I present.

I do one meeting at 10am, I do a meeting at 1pm, and then we have a meeting at 3pm. The meeting at 3pm was one that I had circled on my calendar for quite some time. It was with one of the top technology companies in the United States, and they happen to be based in Boston. James had taken a long time in setting up this appointment, and it was with the executive vice president of marketing. James and I were going to go in there and we were going to show this gentleman how our brand-new really powerful brand management system would help him grow his brand.

Keep in mind that this is a gentleman who is heading up a marketing division for a company that did in excess of 8 or $900 million at the time in annual revenue. I walk into the office undeterred, unintimidated. I set my stuff up. The executive vice president walks in. He sits down and he says, “Hi Dave, what have you got for us?” I launch into my presentation. About 3 minutes into the presentation, the guy raises his hand and he says, “Thanks. I think I’ve heard enough. You showed me nothing new here. I appreciate you coming in, but we’re all set in this area.” Well, I knew as a salesperson that I needed to hear no at least 3 or 4 or 5 times before I got to a yes, so what did I do? I kept going like a robot undeterred.

I kept going with my presentation. I didn’t even stop to hiccup after the gentleman said we’re done here. I got another 35-40 seconds into the presentation, and the only reason I got through that long was because I think the guy was shocked that I was still speaking. At that point, he put both hands on the table, kind of slammed them down, and he said, “I’m not sure you heard me Dave. We’re all set. We’ve got exactly what you’re doing.” He went into a 2-minute speech of his own about what he was doing to measure the power of his brand and how he was certain he was already connecting with the people that were part of his target audience.

I looked at him and I nodded my head and I said, “I appreciate that, but you don’t understand.” Again, I went right back into the same presentation as if he hadn’t said anything at all. I look back now and all I can do is laugh, because as I glanced over at my partner James, I noticed a bead of sweat beginning to form on his forehead and he was looking down at his shoes. Quite frankly, he was so pale, I thought he was going to be sick right there in the room.

At that point, the gentleman stood up and he said, “I’ve never seen anything like this. You are going to keep going regardless of what I say. I’m not sure what I can do to stop you. He said I appreciate that you feel like you have something valuable. We were done.” He’s like, “I think it’s time for you to leave.” He had brought one of his associates in with him and he turned to his associate and he gave him a nod. The associate got up and he walked out of the room. I don’t know at that point, I think I was more determined than ever just to get through my presentation. I had another 10 minutes left, so I just kept going. I really just kept going.

Look, at that point, I think I was thinking to myself, “This guy’s got to admire my persistence.” Well, I think, quite frankly, he was scared, because as I turned around from looking at the slide that was on the screen to looking at the gentleman, I noticed on either side of me were 2 security guards. The gentleman had send his associate out to call security on me and they were there to escort me out of the building.

My friends, this story is something that scarred me for a very long time. I remember thinking in the car all the way back to the airport, on the plane all the way back to New York, and then in the taxicab on the way back to my home in New York City that I didn’t know if I could do this job, because showing up at places and just spewing information was such a tough way to make a living. I felt embarrassed. I felt ashamed and really ultimately I didn’t know if I was going to be able to succeed.

Now, I had in my background a $50 million business I had developed for Marriott in the past. I had been a very successful manager and sales executive in the hotel industry for, like I said, 18 years at that point. In the cab on the way home, I was done. I knew I could not continue like this any longer. Now, you’ve been there. I know you’ve been there, and you may be listening to this and you may be there right now.

Here’s the thing. I changed my approach after that meeting. What I chose to do was I chose to go home and look in the mirror and say, “Listen, if I’m not going to make it in this business, I’m going to fail on my own terms. What I’m going to do is I’m just going to walk in with nothing, with no presentation materials. I’m going to have conversations with people. I’m going to see what issues they have, and I’m going to offer to help if I can, and if I can’t offer to help, then we’ll just part company as friends, but I’m never ever going to allow this to happen to me again.” Now, by allow this, I don’t mean being thrown out of the office by security. I mean, to allow myself to go in and just assume what’s on the client’s mind, assume I know what’s best for the client and to force what I have down the client’s throat. That’s not my style, and it’s not good business.

Here’s what I want you to think about today. I know that you can do this and it will change the way you approach your business. I want you to focus on having real conversations with your clients understanding what they need and helping them solve their problems. I’m going to give you a script that will help you get into that conversation. Now, it’s really important to understand, you don’t have to use my words. The way I outline the script for you, you don’t have to use these exact words. You should internalize the script that I have and put it in your own language. Make it comfortable for you once you do this. Once you have a real conversations with your clients, they’ll view you as somebody who is there to help and not somebody who is there to show up and throw up to just sell them.

Here’s how you get into this conversation. Picture you and I together walking into that same office with that executive vice president of marketing and we sit down. I say, “So Mr. Smith, how are things going? How is your business?” and he tells me. I say, “You know, I was reading about you online. Here are some things I saw and I really admire what you’ve done here. Tell me a little bit about how you got into this in the first place. How did you get into being a marketing executive for technology company?” Then he would tell me now. One of the reasons this question is powerful is because people love to talk about themselves. People love to get into the mode of telling their story, so this will build some rapport, but even more importantly, the person will feel, the person in either side will feel like you’re genuinely interested in him or her. Like you’re genuinely interested in them.

The next thing I want you to do is I want you to say, “Wow, what a great story. Thanks for sharing that with me. How are things going today?” Then they’ll tell you. You say, “How is business? How are things going today? What are you working on now? What are you focused on?” They’ll tell you. The idea is to get them to share some of their goals for the next 6 months, the next year, share some of their aspirations. Once they do that, once they say, “Well, things are going well. We’ve got a brand-new project we’re working on. It’s very important to me. Here it is.” They’ll share the project with you, or they’ll share their goals with you. You say, “mm-hmm, I appreciate that. That’s really, that’s really an interesting project. Why is that important to you personally? How will that impact you personally?” That’s the key to the next step. You have to get to what personally they will achieve when they get the results they want from their business.

My friends, all business is personal. Everything we do in our business world echoes in our personal lives. We define ourselves so often. We define ourselves by what we do that this is a very personal thing to a lot of people, so I want you to ask them what achieving these goals or this goal, or being successful at this project will mean to him or her personally. Once she shares that with you, say, “That’s great. I can’t wait to see that success, but tell me right now what’s holding you back? What’s holding you back from achieving that success?” The person will think about this for a little bit and they’ll tell you. They’ll be very candid with you. You’re having a conversation here.

Now, I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking, “Dave, look if I go in there and I grill this person and I ask him 15 questions or 20 questions, he’s going to think I’m taking a deposition, he’s going to think I’m interviewing him, he’s going to think he’s getting the 3rd degree. Why would he share this information with me?” It’s not like that. It doesn’t work that way. What happens is, this is a conversation and the information is flowing freely, so the person will feel like you’re really interested in what’s going on in his life. You say to him, “What does that mean to you personally?” He shares it with you. You say, “What’s holding you back? What’s keeping this from happening?”

At that point, he’ll reveal to you the roadblocks he’s facing, and you simply say very matter-of-factly, “Would you like some help with that?” Now, at this point when you say that, two things are going to happen. He’s going to say to himself, “Wow, that’s great. I love you to help me. I’d love for some help.” He’ll say to you out loud, “Hmm, sure, I’d like some help,” or he’ll say to you, “What would that help look like?” People never say no. They never say they don’t want help. Everybody’s interested in receiving help from you, and we’ve discussed this in the past offering to help. That’s what selling is all about. Selling is helping.

When you say that, he’ll be interested and he’ll want to know more about how you can help. At that point, you can either offer one of your services or offer to introduce him to someone else who’s going to help him. That’s the entire objective of this conversation. It’s the entire objective of this meeting. If it’s not, if the solution you’re going to provide is not under your roof, if you can’t help him, you need to introduce him to somebody else who can. At that point, you’re going to live to sell your products or services another day. What you’re doing is you’re building that relationship. This is the entire essence of the 60 second sale. I repeat this, these steps over and over again, because this is the essence of the 60 second sale.

You have the opportunity to close a deal for yourself, for your company, but a lot of the time, what you’re going to do is you’re going to make a connection, you’re going to build a relationship, and you may end up introducing the person on the other side of the table to someone else who can solve their problem. You’re not going to refer him to a competitor. You’re going to introduce them to someone completely and totally different in a different area, because the problem may not be something that you can solve, but make no mistake, you have closed the deal right then and there. You’ve closed the deal right there, because that person realizes that he’s in a relationship with you now. He’s got a connection, he’s in a relationship with you, you care about him. Somewhere down the road, you’re going to do business with him in the future. Got it?

He is realizing that you’re interested in him, and those are the people that all of us want in our lives: folks who are out for our best interest, folks who are looking to help make us successful. That’s the 60 second sale. Close the deal on developing a relationship and you may close a sale right now, but more importantly, that relationship will lead to financial prosperity now and down the road.

All right, let’s turn to the mailbag. Today’s mailbag segment is about, it’s really a conversation I had with one of my best clients, one of my favorite people to speak with. Gentleman’s name is Brad Gross. He runs a very successful intellectual property law firm in Florida, in Weston, Florida. Brad had the same issue. He still has the same issue that I had in the story. He’s intimidated by the sales process. It’s funny that Brad is phenomenally successful. He’s grown his practice threefold just in the last 2 years, and he is really, really good at what he does. He’s a technology guru. In fact, I wouldn’t be speaking at a school to call him a tech geek, because he loves that term. He’s a guy who understands technology as well as any engineer. He just happens to be an intellectual property attorney and he’s passionate about technology. He’s passionate about protecting technology and protecting intellectual property.

Brad recently did some speaking and he was on the road at a big convention, and he spoke to over 300 people and he got several leads. He’s in the process of following up with those leads now, and he feels like he’s selling to people because people have requested time with him to review some of their documents in their business. He feels like, at the end of this review, he should just be giving legal advice and not be offering to take money as a result. Brad and I had this conversation, actually it was just yesterday. We did a mindset shift for Brad.

I said to him, “Imagine that you were the doctor, and the patient had come to you and they needed help. You have an ethical obligation to help them. You also have an ethical obligation to feed your family. These are people who are in business. The people you’re helping, they’re in business. They sell a product or service. They sell a product or service or an experience, and they receive compensation as a result. People invest in them because they want the product, service or experience. They know about this exchange of value for money. Right? It’s value for value. You give them value. They give you money in return. Everyone you’re talking to knows that. They’re on the phone with you. They know you’re an attorney. They know you’re there to work with them. They know that you are not, you are not a charity. When you offer to help, you also have to tell them what the investment is in return for that help. Everyone knows the rules when they enter into this conversation with you and you’re there to help them just like the doctor doesn’t help the patient for free. You’re there to help these people for an investment.”

That metaphor and that conversation of helping in return for financial value, for financial compensation help put him back on the right track. These conversations, he began to approach them from a sales perspective versus the perspective of offering advice for charitable purposes. Every time, you have a conversation with someone they know that they’re getting value and in exchange for that, they have to invest in that value financially. If you feel, if you ever feel like you’re intimidated and you’re being put out because you’re being too salesy and you’re forcing yourself on people, remember selling is helping. Your role is to help them solve a problem, help them achieve a goal. In return, you receive fair financial compensation.

That was the conversation I had with Brad, and that’s our mailbag segment for this week. If you have a question where you’d like to discuss something on our weekly podcast, on our weekly show, The 60 Second Sale show, you can reach out to me. You can reach out to me on Twitter. You can find me @thedavelorenzo. That’s the @ symbol and the word T-H-E and my name D-A-V-E L-O-R-E-N-Z-O all together. You can also find me on Facebook, same handle @thedavelorenzo and find me on Instagram @thedavelorenzo.

Until next week, I am Dave Lorenzo and I’m the host of The 60 Second Sale show. I hope you make a great living and live a great life.

Here are three other episodes of the 60 Second Sale you should listen to right now:

How to Build Valuable Relationships with Your Clients

This episode will help you go from a standing start to huge success in relationship development. This will be the end of cold calling forever.

The Fast Way to Multiply Your Referrals

Getting referrals is critical to your success.  This show helps you grow your base of referral partners.

How to Close Sales Faster

Who doesn’t want a quick close?  If this is something that interests you (and it should) you need to listen to this episode of the 60 Second Sale – right now.

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Pushy salespeople suck. In this episode of the 60 second sales show you hear how I discovered a better way. Welcome everyone to another edition of The 60 Second Sale Show. This is Dave Lorenzo, and I’m the guy who helps you close more deals fast. Pushy salespeople suck. In this episode of the 60 second sales show you hear how I discovered a better way.<br /> <br /> Welcome everyone to another edition of The 60 Second Sale Show. This is Dave Lorenzo, and I’m the guy who helps you close more deals fast. Today, I’m going to start off with kind of a confession actually. It really is a confession. I've been thinking a lot about you and what you're facing from a sales perspective, and I wanted to share with you one of the stories that has really shaped my approach to sales over the years. The confession is that, when I first started using this approach, actually how I first started using this approach to sales, it came about really out of the intimidation I felt related to sales and selling. You heard that right. I was absolutely intimated to walk into the office of some senior level executive and offered to help him or his company build and grow their business.<br /> <br /> It seems, I guess, a little, maybe a lot surprising to those of you who know me well, because I go in now and I'm like a steamroller, I'm happy to walk into any executive's office at any time and I just start having a conversation. I guess maybe I should preface it by saying I don't steamroll over people, I steamroll into the office, and then I use the approach we're going to discuss, but at the time when I first started developing this relationship based sales approach, I was a guy who thought that sales was, well, for lack of a better word, show up and throw up type opportunity.<br /> <br /> Here's the story that really changed the way I think about things. I had developed a business for Marriott. I was probably, if I think back I can give you the exact math. It was probably 20, no 18 years, 18 years into my career, and I had developed a $50 million a year annual revenue business for Marriott. I did that by selling corporate housing. I was the GM, I was the executive VP of the brand, but I sold every day because that's who I am. I was selling corporate housing to large companies, to a lot of financial services companies: Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sachs, Bear Stearns, Cantor Fitzgerald, all of the large financial services companies who would place executives on a temporary basis, at least 30 days, but most the time I was for 3 to 6 months. I was doing this in New York City, which is a very fast-paced environment.<br /> <br /> Well, that sales approach was one where I would walk into an executive who handled relocation, usually it was a human resource executive, and I would do a presentation. I would spout off features and benefits, and the executive would either think they were valuable or he wouldn't. Most the time, because I was successful, he would think they were valuable. To be frank, I was selling a Marriott product which was a very high quality product and had a huge successful brand behind me. They would either agree to work with us or they wouldn't.<br /> <br /> The sales process was very straightforward. Like I said, it was a show up and throw up sales process. When I ended up leaving that role when I was recruited to join the Gallup organization to start up their business in Manhattan, I had to change my approach. The reason I had to change my approach came from this specific incident. I worked with a partner when I first started at Gallup, and my partner was a phenomenal relationship oriented guy. His role, I guess, would be considered an inside sales role these days. He would call people on the phone and he would set appointments for me to go in and talk about our consulting services.<br /> <br /> My approach when I first began was one where I figured I would just go in and say, "Hey, I'm Dave. I'm here from Gallup. Here is the latest thing we've come up with you need it in your company. What do you think?" Typical show up and throw up sales process. I would go in there, talk about features and benefits, and apply the features and benefits to the client's sales organization. Dave Lorenzo clean 22:38
Five Habits That Increase Your Income https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/01/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-4/ Mon, 01 Aug 2016 13:00:44 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=238 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/01/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-4/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/08/01/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-4/feed/ 0 Five Habits That Increase Your Income This is Dave Lorenzo and you're listening to the sixty second sales show and in today's episode we're going to talk about the five daily habits that make you more money. Five daily habits that make you more money. This episode actually comes about from an experience I had right when I first started out in sales and in selling. I was running a business for Maria and I needed to attract more people to come to stay in the hotel that I ran. This was something that was not native to me. It was not something that I was used to doing so I did what a lot of sales people do when they start out. I did probably what you did when you started out. I went out and I joined every group possible. I joined every chamber of commerce, I joined every networking group, I joined every organization I could and I was going to a breakfast, a luncheon, a dinner, it seemed like every day of the week. I was meeting a lot of people and I didn't really know what to do after I had met them. I met an older gentleman at one of these Chamber of Commerce meetings and one of the first things he said to me was, when you meet somebody that you really like you should try to follow up with them in a way that's special and personal to them. My thought was okay how am I going to do that? I decided I was going to pick two or three people from every networking meeting that I went to. I was going to just follow up with a note. This is a handwritten note and the reason it was a handwritten note and not an email quite frankly is because this was in the time before everybody had email. People had it and maybe they checked it once a week or maybe they didn't have access to it all the time so if you were going to communicate with people send a note to them in the regular mail. I went out to the local drugstore on the corner and I bought some white note cards that just said ... I think they said thanks on the front, the first batch that I got. I would go to these networking meetings and I would meet people and I would pick three people who were the most interesting to me who I thought I probably could do business with down the road and I would write them just a handwritten note and it was very simple. I would say something to the effect, "It was great meeting you, I really enjoyed the experience, I'd love to speak with you again soon, have a nice day." Something along those lines and I would throw my business card in the envelope and I would send it off. I did this every networking meeting I went to for the first couple of weeks and something amazing happened. I probably sent out fifteen of these in the first two weeks, twenty maybe in the first two weeks. I got four or five phone calls people calling me thanking me for the handwritten note that I sent them and asking if they could connect with me and have lunch and learn more about me and what I did and how they could possibly help me. This was something that for me it was a breakthrough at the time because it was a way for me to schedule follow up meetings, potential sales meetings. These people could have been prospects. It was a way for me to schedule these without having to cold call. It was a way for me to schedule sales appointments without having a cold call. I thought to myself this could be the breakthrough that I've been looking for let me go through the paper and highlight some of the most influential and important people in our community and let me write them a handwritten note. I went to a printer and I got some stationery printed up with my name on it, very nice stationery with my return address printed on the envelope and I started to read the paper every day and pick three people out of the newspaper. I would write them note cards that said congratulations on being featured in the paper. I saw the article in Tuesday's ... And I'd put the name of the paper there. I'd love to connect with you and learn more about what you do. Best wishes for the future. Five Habits That Increase Your Income

This is Dave Lorenzo and you’re listening to the sixty second sales show and in today’s episode we’re going to talk about the five daily habits that make you more money. Five daily habits that make you more money. This episode actually comes about from an experience I had right when I first started out in sales and in selling. I was running a business for Maria and I needed to attract more people to come to stay in the hotel that I ran. This was something that was not native to me. It was not something that I was used to doing so I did what a lot of sales people do when they start out. I did probably what you did when you started out. I went out and I joined every group possible. I joined every chamber of commerce, I joined every networking group, I joined every organization I could and I was going to a breakfast, a luncheon, a dinner, it seemed like every day of the week.

I was meeting a lot of people and I didn’t really know what to do after I had met them. I met an older gentleman at one of these Chamber of Commerce meetings and one of the first things he said to me was, when you meet somebody that you really like you should try to follow up with them in a way that’s special and personal to them. My thought was okay how am I going to do that? I decided I was going to pick two or three people from every networking meeting that I went to. I was going to just follow up with a note. This is a handwritten note and the reason it was a handwritten note and not an email quite frankly is because this was in the time before everybody had email. People had it and maybe they checked it once a week or maybe they didn’t have access to it all the time so if you were going to communicate with people send a note to them in the regular mail.

I went out to the local drugstore on the corner and I bought some white note cards that just said … I think they said thanks on the front, the first batch that I got. I would go to these networking meetings and I would meet people and I would pick three people who were the most interesting to me who I thought I probably could do business with down the road and I would write them just a handwritten note and it was very simple. I would say something to the effect, “It was great meeting you, I really enjoyed the experience, I’d love to speak with you again soon, have a nice day.” Something along those lines and I would throw my business card in the envelope and I would send it off. I did this every networking meeting I went to for the first couple of weeks and something amazing happened. I probably sent out fifteen of these in the first two weeks, twenty maybe in the first two weeks. I got four or five phone calls people calling me thanking me for the handwritten note that I sent them and asking if they could connect with me and have lunch and learn more about me and what I did and how they could possibly help me.

This was something that for me it was a breakthrough at the time because it was a way for me to schedule follow up meetings, potential sales meetings. These people could have been prospects. It was a way for me to schedule these without having to cold call. It was a way for me to schedule sales appointments without having a cold call. I thought to myself this could be the breakthrough that I’ve been looking for let me go through the paper and highlight some of the most influential and important people in our community and let me write them a handwritten note. I went to a printer and I got some stationery printed up with my name on it, very nice stationery with my return address printed on the envelope and I started to read the paper every day and pick three people out of the newspaper.

I would write them note cards that said congratulations on being featured in the paper. I saw the article in Tuesday’s … And I’d put the name of the paper there. I’d love to connect with you and learn more about what you do. Best wishes for the future. I hope your business is as accessible as you would hope it would be and I would throw my business card in the envelope. Sure enough one out of every six or seven of those people would call me up and they would say it was really nice of you to send me the note, I really appreciate it, I’d love to get together with you. Again it took the place of having to make cold calls.

This habit is something that I’ve done now for … When I first did this that was probably twenty five almost thirty years ago. This habit is something that I do every day. I pick out three people in the newspaper and I write them handwritten notes congratulating them on being profiled in the paper and I pick three people who I’ve connected with over time and I write them a handwritten note saying it was great to meet them I’d love to see them again soon. I do this every day and it opens up a number of doors for me even today, even in the business that I’m in now. You can do this. It can make you a much more successful sales person because it’s a great way to introduce yourself to people with whom you can do business.

Let’s talk about how you can put this habit which is by the way a daily habit number one. I call it the handwritten note habit. Very sophisticated title, the handwritten note habit. Daily habit number one, here’s how you can put this into practice in your business right now. Each day go through the Internet or go through the newspaper and highlight three people, three people you want to connect with and write them a handwritten note. Simply congratulate them on being profiled in the paper, congratulate them for their success, whatever you need to say to get them … Whatever you need to say to connect with them on a personal level. Congratulations are great, recognition is great, everyone is under recognized. Write them a handwritten note, hand address the envelope, drop it in the mail with a real stamp. Don’t run it through your postage meter but a real stamp on the outside and drop it in the mail. You’ll be amazed at what happens.

Three people from the paper and then three people with whom you’ve connected in the past but only one time. These could be three people you meet at a networking event or three people who you’ve done business with who you’d like to do more business with. It’s a great opportunity to thank someone for the business they’ve done with you. It’s a great opportunity to connect with them and say, “I really enjoyed the speech I attended that you delivered on Thursday. I’d love to hear more about you and what you do, let’s connect again in the future,” and throw your business card in the envelope, hand address, it and send it out.

The handwritten note is powerful because it shows that you’ve taken the time to recognize someone. It shows that you’ve taken the time to recognize someone. When you do that people appreciate it and one out of every five times they’re going to reach back out to you and they’re going to say that they want to meet you, they want to learn more about you and what you do. Again, our focus with sixty second sales is always to help the other person first. The key to winning someone over in sixty seconds is focus on them and helping them achieve their goals. Your hand written note will show them that you have an external orientation. That you’re focused on them and that you want to connect with them on a personal level.

Moving on now to daily habit number two. Daily habit number two is … I would call it, the call your mom habit. None of us call our mothers as often as we should. We don’t call the people we care about as often as we should and it seems like common sense that if you picked up the phone and you’d said to someone, “Hey let’s connect, how are you doing?” It seems like common sense that doing this would lead to more business. If it’s such common sense why aren’t any of us doing it? Why aren’t you doing it each and every single day? Well, you’re going to start doing this every day now. I want you to pick up the phone and call someone you haven’t spoken with in at least five years, longer is fine. Think about all those people that you connect with on social media. On Facebook, on LinkedIn, you connect with people with whom you’ve worked ten years ago, fifteen years ago.

You connect with them on social media and you think to yourself okay that’s fine. Or you connect with them on Facebook and you think, “Yeah that’s how we’ll keep our friendship alive. I want you to take your business contacts and I want you to look through them and connect with someone who is really influential and could have sent you a ton a business years ago but didn’t or did send you a ton of business years ago in a previous career.

I want you to reach out to one of these people every day. Pick up the phone and have a fifteen minute conversation. Say something to the effect of, “I wanted to call you today because I wanted to connect with you. I was thinking about … “Talk about your past relationship. I was thinking about how we did business on Salmo case ten years ago. I was reflecting on that and I thought to myself he’s a really good guy let me reach out to him and see what he’s doing now so I figured I would connect with you.” The key to this habit, the key to the call your mom habit is you need to make phone calls until you actually have a conversation with someone.

Each of us have a list of contacts that will take our call. The list is probably about two hundred fifty people long. I want you to reach out to just one of those people, have one conversation every workday. One conversation every workday with someone you haven’t spoken with in a while to reconnect with them. In a business context you will be amazed at the results you achieve from doing this. People will say to you, “I have not … I can’t even imagine who I’m using to do what you do now. I forgot that you were in this business.” That’s the key. Instead of making one extra cold call, make one call to someone who did business with you years ago that you forgot about and they forgot about you. That’s habit number two, the call your mom habit.

Habit number three; eat with someone. There are three meals every day. There’s breakfast, lunch, and dinner every single day. Each day you probably eat at least one of those meals with your family, keep doing that, but the other two are opportunities for you to connect with someone who could be valuable to you. I want you to reach out at least two days a week and connect with someone and having their breakfast or lunch with them. Of the five workdays, two breakfasts and two lunches are done with someone else. You don’t have to pay each time, you can split the bill don’t worry about that. I want you to have a lunch with someone who’s influential, someone who could do business with you.

A meal is a perfect opportunity for you to connect with someone and to share … Breaking bread really. Sharing a meal, breaking bread is something that creates a bond with people. I want you to reach out to somebody every day and just ask to take them out to lunch and if they say, “What’s the reason why? Say, “I’d like to get to know you a little better and see if I can help you in your business.” If they say wow that sounds really disingenuous or they seem a little skittish say, “I make it a habit to have breakfast with somebody different every single day. I want you to be the person tomorrow, will you join me?” This habit alone will make you a ton of money. I know what you’re thinking, you’re thinking oh my gosh that’s a lot of time, I have to go to lunch, I have to drive to the lunch, I have to sit down, I have to eat with somebody, I have to drive back from lunch, I don’t know that I’m going to get a return on investment of my time. I appreciate that.

If there’s somebody who you’re not sure whether the return on investment will be huge or not, go to breakfast with them. I love breakfast meetings. In fact I do very few one on one lunch meetings any longer. I do a lot of breakfast meetings. The reason why? I get to the person before their day starts, we start out our day together and breakfast I can schedule early and then be finished and back to work before most people even get in the office I can schedule a breakfast for 7:30 am, be finished having breakfast with someone and be back at my desk by 9:00. I want you at least two days a week preferably more, preferably every day to reach out and have breakfast or lunch with people who can do business with you or people who can refer business to you. Those are your two target audiences. They’re people who could either be potential clients or people who could be potential referral sources. People who are referral sources only these are evangelists and they’re influencers. They can influence other people to do business with you. Those are perfect people for you to go to breakfast with or for you to go to lunch with and that’s habit number three, eating with someone every single day.

Habit number four is something that you need to do for yourself. It’s something that takes very little time but it’s critically important for your self-esteem. It’s critically important for your confidence as you grow and develop your business. The number one reason businesses fail … When I first started out as a consultant I thought to myself, “Boy I’m going to find that it’s really tough for businesses to get financing,” and that’s going to be the number one reason why businesses fail. I made myself go out and I’ve formed a lot of relationships with bankers so that I could help people get financing. That’s not the case. The number one reason people are unsuccessful in biz, the number one reason people are unsuccessful in sales is a lack of confidence.

Habit number four is very simple and it will keep you focused on what’s important to grow your self-confidence. Every day I want you to take fifteen minutes maybe even ten minutes, it doesn’t take very long at all. Before you go to bed and I want you to write down three things that you accomplished during the course of the day. They can be three things in your business life or three things in your personal life. Write down just three things that you’ve accomplished during the course of the day that you’re happy about, that you’re proud of, or that you’re grateful for. You’re going to write these three things down because it will focus you on things that went right during the course of your day. Even on the worst day, even the worst day possible three things went well. I want you focused on those as the last thing you think about before you turn out the light and get into bed at night.

Then when you wake up in the morning I want you to look at what you wrote, just keep it in a little notebook. I keep a little notebook by the side of my bed. First thing in the morning I want you to open that note book up and look at the three things you wrote from the day before. You’ll be amazed at how this impacts your attitude. This is so powerful because what it does is it focuses you on the things you’ve accomplished and that boosts your self-esteem. As I said the number one reason salespeople are unsuccessful, the number one reason businesses fail has nothing to do with finances it has everything to do with confidence and self-esteem. If you look at the things you’ve accomplished every day twice a day in the morning and at night you will boost your self-esteem and you’ll be on top of the world.

Habit number five, the last habit is what I call the arm’s length rule. The arm’s length rule. I want you to introduce yourself to anyone who comes within arm’s length of you. I know what you’re thinking here. You’re thinking that I’ll be a crazy person, I’ll be running around all day. On the subway to work I take an elevator up stairs I’ll be introducing myself to fifteen twenty new people a day. That’s exactly right. I want you to introduce yourself to fifteen twenty new people a day. Here’s what I want you to do. Strategically pick out one or two people to do this with tomorrow. Strategically pick out four people to do it with the day after, pick out six people the day after that, the next thing you know you’re introducing yourself to everyone everywhere and you never can’t tell how this is going to pay off. I’ll tell you how it paid off for me.

When I worked for the Gallup organization, I worked at 1251 Avenue of the Americas. That is Rockefeller Center. It’s right across from Radio City Music Hall. It’s 6th Avenue in New York City. In that building was the Canadian consulate and also the headquarters of the National Hockey League. I was getting into the elevator one day to go up to our floor, I had a cup of coffee in my hand. I walk in and there was a very small gentleman small in stature but big in importance. A short gentleman in there with two very large gentlemen who are obviously with him. I walk in the elevator it’s just the four of us in there and I said, “Hi my name’s Dave,” and he said my name’s Gary and he stuck out his hand he shook my hand. I said, “Gary, what do you do for work?” As were riding up in the elevator. I was going to the thirty eighth floor he was going up even higher than that.

He said, “Well Dave it just so happens I’m the commissioner of the National Hockey League.” This was at a time when the National Hockey League had just gone through a horrific strike it had resulted in the cancellation of a season. They had just made a deal to get back into playing again. I said, “Wow Gary that’s fascinating. I bet you’ve got a lot on your mind now. What’s the biggest challenge you’re facing today?” He chuckled and he said, “It’s funny I just came from a meeting with the referees and we’re having a hard time determining how we’re going to select referees moving forward.” I said, “This is fate because our company the Gallup organization helps select referees for the National Basketball Association,” and he said, “Really?” I said, “Yeah, I’d love to help you with that if you’re looking for some help. Do you want some help with that?” He said, “Absolutely. Stop by my office later today, will make an appointment and we’ll get together to talk about it.” Not only did I stop by his office but I ended up working with them and it became a highly productive account for us just because I introduced myself who was within arm’s length of me.

This is not going to happen every time you do this. Sometimes people are going to think you’re crazy. Sometimes you’re going to walk away from you. People may even say nasty things to you sometimes, it happens but that one time, that one time is worth fifty or one hundred embarrassing awkward situations and believe me none of them are ever embarrassing or awkward you just move on with your day. That one time you create a valuable relationship that puts money in your pocket. These are the five daily habits. We talked about writing a handwritten note. Write three handwritten notes every day. We talked about picking up the phone and calling someone you hadn’t spoken with, common sense but common sense isn’t all that common. Eating with someone two, four times a week. Expressing gratitude which will help you focus your confidence and the arm’s length rule, introducing yourself to someone who can perhaps change everything for you.

As the mailbag section of our show today and we have actually a question from Twitter. Matthew [inaudible 00:19:46] asks, how do I ask good qualifying questions when cold calling? Matthew I really appreciate the question. When you’re reaching out to people on the phone and you’re cold calling, one of the toughest things to do is to qualify the person to see if they’re a good fit for you. What I like to have folks do is you have to have a reason to call. You can’t just call people up. You have to have a reason to call and once you’re on the phone with them you have to ask them about something that’s going on in their business or their life that you can help them with. I prefer to choose my lists for cold calling from either news events or through some means where I know I have something in common with the person and then I just start by asking them a question.

For example I’ll cold call and I’ll say, “Hi Matthew this is Dave Lorenzo calling from Valtimax consulting. I just wanted to check in with you because I saw you quoted in the paper about your staffing situation. I’m wondering if you’d like some help with staffing up your organization from a sales perspective?” Then they’ll either say yes or no and at that point you know they have a problem you can solve. When you’re looking to qualify people you need to figure out whether they have a problem you can solve, money to pay you, and the ability to make a decision.

Asking qualifying questions starts with determining whether or not they need help and if they do say they need help whether or not they want help from you. Simply asking about something that you know is a point of focus for them is a great way to start the qualifying process. Thank you Matthew for the question we take questions on Twitter. My Twitter name and my Twitter handle is @the_DaveLorenzo, @the_ DaveLorenzo and that is our show for today. I’m Dave Lorenzo and this is the sixty second sale show and until next time I hope you make a great living and live a great life.

Here are links to our last three shows. Use them to help grow your business:

How to Close Deals Faster

If you like making money, fast, this is the show for you.  Join me as we explore how you can close deals – quickly.

Secrets of the Referral Multiplier

Who else wants to triple their referrals?  This show will help you jump start your referral process.

How to Build Relationships with Clients

Everyone knows what a relationship is but we forget about building them during the sales process.  Don’t try and shove your product down the client’s throat until you understand his situation.  This show helps you with that process.

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Five Habits That Increase Your Income This is Dave Lorenzo and you're listening to the sixty second sales show and in today's episode we're going to talk about the five daily habits that make you more money. Five Habits That Increase Your Income<br /> <br /> This is Dave Lorenzo and you're listening to the sixty second sales show and in today's episode we're going to talk about the five daily habits that make you more money. Five daily habits that make you more money. This episode actually comes about from an experience I had right when I first started out in sales and in selling. I was running a business for Maria and I needed to attract more people to come to stay in the hotel that I ran. This was something that was not native to me. It was not something that I was used to doing so I did what a lot of sales people do when they start out. I did probably what you did when you started out. I went out and I joined every group possible. I joined every chamber of commerce, I joined every networking group, I joined every organization I could and I was going to a breakfast, a luncheon, a dinner, it seemed like every day of the week.<br /> <br /> I was meeting a lot of people and I didn't really know what to do after I had met them. I met an older gentleman at one of these Chamber of Commerce meetings and one of the first things he said to me was, when you meet somebody that you really like you should try to follow up with them in a way that's special and personal to them. My thought was okay how am I going to do that? I decided I was going to pick two or three people from every networking meeting that I went to. I was going to just follow up with a note. This is a handwritten note and the reason it was a handwritten note and not an email quite frankly is because this was in the time before everybody had email. People had it and maybe they checked it once a week or maybe they didn't have access to it all the time so if you were going to communicate with people send a note to them in the regular mail.<br /> <br /> I went out to the local drugstore on the corner and I bought some white note cards that just said ... I think they said thanks on the front, the first batch that I got. I would go to these networking meetings and I would meet people and I would pick three people who were the most interesting to me who I thought I probably could do business with down the road and I would write them just a handwritten note and it was very simple. I would say something to the effect, "It was great meeting you, I really enjoyed the experience, I'd love to speak with you again soon, have a nice day." Something along those lines and I would throw my business card in the envelope and I would send it off. I did this every networking meeting I went to for the first couple of weeks and something amazing happened. I probably sent out fifteen of these in the first two weeks, twenty maybe in the first two weeks. I got four or five phone calls people calling me thanking me for the handwritten note that I sent them and asking if they could connect with me and have lunch and learn more about me and what I did and how they could possibly help me.<br /> <br /> This was something that for me it was a breakthrough at the time because it was a way for me to schedule follow up meetings, potential sales meetings. These people could have been prospects. It was a way for me to schedule these without having to cold call. It was a way for me to schedule sales appointments without having a cold call. I thought to myself this could be the breakthrough that I've been looking for let me go through the paper and highlight some of the most influential and important people in our community and let me write them a handwritten note. I went to a printer and I got some stationery printed up with my name on it, very nice stationery with my return address printed on the envelope and I started to read the paper every day and pick three people out of the newspaper.<br /> <br /> I would write them note cards that said congratulations on being featured in the paper. I saw the article in Tuesday's ... And I'd put the name of the paper there. Dave Lorenzo clean 21:47
How To Close Deals Fast https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/25/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-3/ Mon, 25 Jul 2016 13:00:35 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=236 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/25/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-3/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/25/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-3/feed/ 0 How To Close Deals Fast Hey there Workplace Warriors. It's Dave Lorenzo and this is, The 60 Second Sale Show. I'm the guy who helps you close more deals, fast, and today I'm going to remind you that we're in the business of building relationships. When we build relationships we close deals, and we do it quickly. Now, being fast is often times more important than being best. I know that's shocking, so I'm going to say it again. Being fast is more important than being best. In fact, I've made a career, a great career, out of being faster than everybody else. Back in 1999, I was the Vice President and General Manager of ExecuStay, that was Marriott's corporate housing brand, and I worked in New York City. There is no faster place on earth than New York City. Corporate housing at that time, especially in New York City, was an extremely competitive business. Now, for those of you who don't know, corporate housing is really like an extended stay apartment, if you will. In fact, in New York, these were actual apartments that I would go out and sublease for Marriott from either condominium owners or from large developers, and then my team and I would furnish them, we would turn on all the utilities, the cable. At that time they had land line telephones. We'd set all that up, and then executives would move into them for 30 days or longer. Now, Marriott had just gotten into this business. In fact, I was the pioneer of this business for them in New York City and this period of time in New York real estate was crazy. Apartments were flying out of realtors' inventory, developers would finish putting up the walls in a building and while the paint was drying, they would sell out the entire building. They'd rent the entire building full of apartments overnight. This made it really tough for my team and it made it really tough for me to close deals because we could never get enough inventory, we could never get enough apartments. We had nothing to sell. This was actually good news. We took those lemons and we made fantastic lemonade because it meant that my competitors couldn't get any inventory either. I realized that if I could solve this problem, solve the problem of demand in the market, I would have a huge competitive advantage. I used my sales skills to tackle this problem. There were a few publications that developers would use to announce projects they were developing. They would do this with the hope of attracting people to lease their new building quickly. What I did was I hired a publicist and I instructed that publicist to go out and connect me with these developers. I wanted to know which buildings were being developed and which buildings would be ready quickly. At 2:30pm, one April afternoon, I remember it like it was yesterday, this is in 1999 now, I found out a developer was ready to lease up a building on the West Side of Manhattan. The building was due to open in July of that year. Once my publicist let me know that this developer was going to go out with a big campaign to announce this building, I went to his office that afternoon. I went with my check book and I wrote a hundred thousand dollar check as a deposit for the entire building. He cancelled the publication of the story, didn't have to do any marketing at all for his building. I was able to lease up the 80 apartments in that building and my sales team was outstanding. We filled it before the ink was even dry on that lease. Now, I used this strategy several times over the next two years and I dominated the market. We were able to obtain a 70% market share, 70% market share of the corporate housing business in New York City, in 1999, 2000 and early 2001. We were able to do that because I was better than my competitors, well, maybe I was better than my competitors. Was I smarter than my competitors? Yeah, maybe I was a little smarter than my competitors, but was I faster than my competitors, was speed my competitive advantage? You bet. How To Close Deals Fast

Hey there Workplace Warriors. It’s Dave Lorenzo and this is, The 60 Second Sale Show. I’m the guy who helps you close more deals, fast, and today I’m going to remind you that we’re in the business of building relationships. When we build relationships we close deals, and we do it quickly. Now, being fast is often times more important than being best. I know that’s shocking, so I’m going to say it again. Being fast is more important than being best. In fact, I’ve made a career, a great career, out of being faster than everybody else. Back in 1999, I was the Vice President and General Manager of ExecuStay, that was Marriott’s corporate housing brand, and I worked in New York City. There is no faster place on earth than New York City. Corporate housing at that time, especially in New York City, was an extremely competitive business.

Now, for those of you who don’t know, corporate housing is really like an extended stay apartment, if you will. In fact, in New York, these were actual apartments that I would go out and sublease for Marriott from either condominium owners or from large developers, and then my team and I would furnish them, we would turn on all the utilities, the cable. At that time they had land line telephones. We’d set all that up, and then executives would move into them for 30 days or longer. Now, Marriott had just gotten into this business. In fact, I was the pioneer of this business for them in New York City and this period of time in New York real estate was crazy. Apartments were flying out of realtors’ inventory, developers would finish putting up the walls in a building and while the paint was drying, they would sell out the entire building.

They’d rent the entire building full of apartments overnight. This made it really tough for my team and it made it really tough for me to close deals because we could never get enough inventory, we could never get enough apartments. We had nothing to sell. This was actually good news. We took those lemons and we made fantastic lemonade because it meant that my competitors couldn’t get any inventory either. I realized that if I could solve this problem, solve the problem of demand in the market, I would have a huge competitive advantage. I used my sales skills to tackle this problem. There were a few publications that developers would use to announce projects they were developing. They would do this with the hope of attracting people to lease their new building quickly.

What I did was I hired a publicist and I instructed that publicist to go out and connect me with these developers. I wanted to know which buildings were being developed and which buildings would be ready quickly. At 2:30pm, one April afternoon, I remember it like it was yesterday, this is in 1999 now, I found out a developer was ready to lease up a building on the West Side of Manhattan. The building was due to open in July of that year. Once my publicist let me know that this developer was going to go out with a big campaign to announce this building, I went to his office that afternoon. I went with my check book and I wrote a hundred thousand dollar check as a deposit for the entire building. He cancelled the publication of the story, didn’t have to do any marketing at all for his building. I was able to lease up the 80 apartments in that building and my sales team was outstanding.

We filled it before the ink was even dry on that lease. Now, I used this strategy several times over the next two years and I dominated the market. We were able to obtain a 70% market share, 70% market share of the corporate housing business in New York City, in 1999, 2000 and early 2001. We were able to do that because I was better than my competitors, well, maybe I was better than my competitors. Was I smarter than my competitors? Yeah, maybe I was a little smarter than my competitors, but was I faster than my competitors, was speed my competitive advantage? You bet. Speed enabled me to obtain an unheard of, unheard of 70% market share in the corporate housing business, in New York City. This led me to be named one of Crain’s 40 Under 40. Crain’s New York Business, is a publication in New York City. I was one of Crain’s 40 Business Leaders to Watch Under the age of 40 in 2001.

It’s because I was able to dominate the corporate housing industry, all because I was fast. That was it, speed allowed me to do that, speed allowed my company to make a lot of money, speed was responsible for my success. Now, I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking, “That’s great, Dave, but what if I make a mistake because I acted too fast? What if I rush into something and it turns out not to be the best decision?” Now, I used to think that, too. That’s my confession to you. I used to think that, too. “What if I act too quickly? What if I act in haste and I blow it?” Well, something changed my mind on that. Something really helped me understand the competitive advantage that speed gives me. My team and I were working on a proposal for a consulting engagement with a large credit union and we thought we were the only consulting company invited to present to them.

The buyer let it slip, at one point, that there were other people who were in the running, and you know what, this actually made me angry. Had I known this I would have taken a different approach. I would have expressed my absolute displeasure with the fact that they were going out to bid. I would have told them that I wanted to present last and I wanted a yes or a no answer. I might not have even wanted to present at all, because quite frankly, I knew we were the best solution for him. Well, when I expressed this to the buyer he said, “Well, you know, I don’t know what to tell you. What can we do to make it right?” I said, “Here’s what I’d like. I’d like to go last and I’d like you to give me a yes or no answer before I leave the room.” I heard him let out a big sigh and he said, “Well, you know, you’re already scheduled to go first, but I’m sure we can give you a yes or no before you leave the room.”

Here’s what I’m thinking now, I’m thinking to myself, “Oh, God, I got to go first, we have to present, and then everybody else is going to get a chance to build on what we’ve presented.” I said to him, “All right, well, you’re going to give us feedback, right? We’ll present, you’ll give us a yes or a no, and then you’ll give us feedback?” He said, “Absolutely, we’ll definitely give you feedback, we’ll give you a yes or a no,” and we went on and we did it. We presented first and we waited for their answer. We waited outside while they deliberated for about 25, 30 minutes. We walked back in and we got a no. I said, “Let me have the feedback.” They gave us the feedback. At this point I felt really foolish because we had jumped in really quickly, we had gone first, and I felt absolutely foolish. My team, I felt like I had let my team down.

I felt dumb, no, actually I felt angry. I really actually felt like I had been completely and totally deceived. In fact, it felt like I had been stripped naked on the 50 yard line of a football field and there were 75,000 people just laughing hysterically at me. I looked over at the buyer, I looked at the committee, and I was dejected and disgusted. I said, “Look, you got to give me a chance to come back tomorrow. You got to give us a chance to present to you with the feedback you’ve given us. We need an opportunity to come back and take another shot at this. That’s the least you can do after you’ve deceived us in this process.” The buyer was kind of flustered and the committee kind of … There was a murmur in the room. I persisted and they agreed. They said, “Okay, fine. Here’s what we’ll do. Tomorrow, after the second group presents, you come back and you can take another shot at this.”

I said, “All right, and you’re going to give us a yes or a no, and if you tell us no, you’re going to give us feedback, right?” They said, “Yeah, same deal as today, but look, that’s it. You come back tomorrow and you present, and that’s it.” I said, “Fine.” My team and I went back, we got a hotel room, we went back to the hotel, we worked on the proposal all night. The next day we came back after the second group presented and we presented again. We go outside the room, again, these folks deliberated, and again, the answer was no. Now, at this point, I knew that we were the best people for them. I knew we could help them the most, I knew we could provide them with the most value. I knew that if I could just get the finer points of the deal right, and I could tell that the second time we had gone back we had another two or three members of this seven member committee that we had won over, we just didn’t have all of them yet.

I knew that if we had gotten this just right, we would have the opportunity to get this business and it would be great for the client. I just felt that in my bones. They gave us their feedback and I said, “Come on now. You know we’re the best people for this project. I know that you’ve said no to us twice, just give us one more chance. You got to let us come back the last time. You know we’re the best for this, you know we want to deliver the most value. You’re obviously not happy with the other people who presented today, otherwise you wouldn’t have even let us in this room. Give us one more chance to get this right.” They were absolutely outraged. Some people on the committee were going crazy that I would ask for this third opportunity, but they said, “Give us a chance to talk it over.” We stepped outside the room again.

Five minutes later the buyer came out and he said, “Look, we’re going to give you one more shot. Come back tomorrow, this is it. You’re not coming back after this. If you don’t get it right this time, that’s the end.” On the third day, I walked into the room and I said, “Here’s the bottom line. You know and I know that we’re absolutely, positively the right team, I think we’re all in agreement. There are some finer points in this deal that you’re not happy with. Why don’t we do this, you present to me, each one of you, the things you want to see in this deal, and then I will give you a yes or a no and let you know whether we can do all those things?” I looked at the two other members of the team that were with me presenting, they had no idea I was going to do this. We had actually worked on an entire presentation the night before. I looked at the committee and, to my surprise, our buyer actually went first.

He gave me a laundry list of things that he wanted to see in the deal. Six or seven of them, we hadn’t included to this point. About half of those we had put in our presentation, the presentation that we prepared the night before. Once the buyer presented those things, I looked at the members of my team and I said, “We can agree to all of those things. In fact, we prepared a presentation that has those things in them, we’ll be happy to show it to you. Let me open the floor up for discussion from other members of the committee.” Two or three other people gave me their ideas, their thoughts. Most of them were very easy for us to accommodate, a couple of them were a bit of a stretch. We agreed to do it and that was it, the deal was done. Now, how did this convince me that speed was important? Well, we presented first, and because we presented first, we were able to gauge the interest and the elements of the deal.

We were able to gauge the interest of the buyer, we were able to put a finer point on the items included in the deal, and then we were able to come back and correct ourselves, correct the offer, so that we could actually get the deal closed. Think about it, the value of speed is that even if you’re wrong and you’re quick, you can take corrective action just in time to save the day. You, my friends, you need to increase the speed in your sales process. You have to be faster than everyone else, because speed is a huge competitive advantage. Now, here’s how you do that. The first thing you need to do, in order to increase the speed in your sales process, is you need to be super organized. You have to be absolutely, positively organized and ready to go at a moment’s notice, and this includes organizing yourself mentally.

You need to know your strengths. You must know what you’re good at and you must know what you should not focus on when it comes to your sales process. You also need to know your competition and you need to know the market. Know where your competition is weak and know how you can take advantage of those weaknesses. Then, you have to know the market and the industry. You have to be able to determine where the industry is going and you have to get there first. Remember, even if you’re wrong, when you make recommendations to your client, you have the ability to correct your course because you were first, you were fastest, you were there with the answers when they needed them. In fact, if you can anticipate people’s needs and be there before they know what they need, you will have a huge competitive advantage. Just like I did in corporate housing in the late 1990’s, you will dominate the market.

The next things you need to do is, you always need to be confident. You must always be confident. We talk about the ABC’s, of sales. If you’ve seen the movie, Glengarry Glen Ross, they talk about the ABC’s, right? Their ABC process is always be closing. Well, I agree with that, but my ABC process is always be confident. That’s my ABC rule. I follow the philosophy of the thirtieth Treasury Secretary of the United States. Her name was Ivy Baker Priest, and she was only the second woman to hold this position. Her philosophy was that she was often wrong but never in doubt. If you’re always confident, that confidence will come through. If you’re fast and you’re confident, you’ll be able dominate your market. You’ve got to feel great about your ability to help the client. You’ve got to be confident in your ability to help the client.

If you are and you walk in with that confidence, the speed and the confidence are a powerful combination. It’s like a one, two, punch. It’s a left cross and an uppercut. The minute you apply those two things to your sales process, you will dominate your market. Finally, you have to have discipline. When you want something, you have to focus on doing everything necessary to get it. Lay out the steps in the process and follow them to the letter. With this discipline comes the ability to be nimble and turn on a dime. Speed is a huge competitive advantage and it only requires that you have the courage to focus on it, the confidence to be able to deliver, and the discipline to follow your approach. Now, it’s time for us to open up our big old mail bag and see what you, our listeners, want to hear more about.

Today, we’re reading an e-mail from a guy by the name of Marco, out there in San Dimas, California. Marco, thanks for your e-mail. Marco writes, “Dave, I often hear you talk about doing things quickly. You talk about using quickness as a competitive advantage. Well, my boss has to sign off on all of our proposals and he takes forever to approve these things. How can I use speed as a competitive advantage, if my boss is holding me back?” Wow, well, Marco, that’s a great question. The first thing you should do, and this is something that you may have already done, but I’m going to tell you to do it anyway, you’ve got to go in to your boss and you go to ask him to trust you. They hired you for a reason, you’re there to close deals. You’re a salesperson, that’s what you do. You got to ask your boss, “Listen, I’d like you to reconsider your policy of approving all these deals and I’d like you to trust me.”

Now, there’s a chance your boss won’t agree to that. If he doesn’t, you should beg for forgiveness and not ask for permission. Here’s why I say that, your job is to close deals, so if you go out and you write proposals, and you’re doing presentations, and you’re getting to the clients quickly, you’ll end up probably closing more deals than not, but the deals you don’t close, you never have to tell your boss about because you didn’t close the deal, you didn’t commit the company to anything, so what’s the problem? There is none. The deals you do close, that’s what you’re there for. Nobody gets fired for closing too many deals. While you may receive some friction, there may be some friction in your relationship with your boss, you’ll still be bringing in business.

Now, here’s the critical point, Marco. If you make your boss look good while you’re closing these deals, you guys will be happy as clams. You guys will be able to work together, hand-in-hand, and at that point, you can go to him and say, “Boss, can you trust me? I just brought in three deals worth X dollars and I made you look good in the process. That’s my mission, that’s my purpose. I’m here to make you look good and I do that by using speed as my competitive advantage.” Always allow your boss to take credit for the sales victories, and if you do, you will help him look good, and he will feel great about your relationship, and that will lead to trust. You’re going to have to go out on a limb, but it’s so important that speed is a competitive advantage for you. I want you to take this chance and I want you to do that.

First, ask for the trust up front. If you don’t receive it, then it’s always better to ask for forgiveness than to beg for permission. All right, thanks very much Marco for your question. Thanks to all of you for listening. That’s our show for today. This is, The 60 Second Sale Show, I’m Dave Lorenzo. Until next time, here’s hoping you make a great living and live a great life.

Here are a few additional resources you will find helpful:

Leverage the Power of the Referral Multiplier

This is a great episode of The 60 Second Sale Show. We discuss the creation of evangelists – people who go out and promote you – for free.  If you would like to discover how to make this happen for you, click the title above and invest a few minutes in this podcast episode.

Better Relationships Means More Profit

This episode of The 60 Second Sale show is all about your relationship with your customer.  If you want to take more money to the ban, you need to build better, more profitable relationships.  This episode shows you how.  Click on the episode title (above) to discover how you can make more money, with your existing clients.

Facebook Live Videos

Join me on my Facebook page for live videos to help you make more money.  Each day I host a live video session to help you increase sales.  Join us by clicking the “like” button on my Facebook Page

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How To Close Deals Fast Hey there Workplace Warriors. It's Dave Lorenzo and this is, The 60 Second Sale Show. I'm the guy who helps you close more deals, fast, and today I'm going to remind you that we're in the business of building relationships. How To Close Deals Fast<br /> <br /> Hey there Workplace Warriors. It's Dave Lorenzo and this is, The 60 Second Sale Show. I'm the guy who helps you close more deals, fast, and today I'm going to remind you that we're in the business of building relationships. When we build relationships we close deals, and we do it quickly. Now, being fast is often times more important than being best. I know that's shocking, so I'm going to say it again. Being fast is more important than being best. In fact, I've made a career, a great career, out of being faster than everybody else. Back in 1999, I was the Vice President and General Manager of ExecuStay, that was Marriott's corporate housing brand, and I worked in New York City. There is no faster place on earth than New York City. Corporate housing at that time, especially in New York City, was an extremely competitive business.<br /> <br /> Now, for those of you who don't know, corporate housing is really like an extended stay apartment, if you will. In fact, in New York, these were actual apartments that I would go out and sublease for Marriott from either condominium owners or from large developers, and then my team and I would furnish them, we would turn on all the utilities, the cable. At that time they had land line telephones. We'd set all that up, and then executives would move into them for 30 days or longer. Now, Marriott had just gotten into this business. In fact, I was the pioneer of this business for them in New York City and this period of time in New York real estate was crazy. Apartments were flying out of realtors' inventory, developers would finish putting up the walls in a building and while the paint was drying, they would sell out the entire building.<br /> <br /> They'd rent the entire building full of apartments overnight. This made it really tough for my team and it made it really tough for me to close deals because we could never get enough inventory, we could never get enough apartments. We had nothing to sell. This was actually good news. We took those lemons and we made fantastic lemonade because it meant that my competitors couldn't get any inventory either. I realized that if I could solve this problem, solve the problem of demand in the market, I would have a huge competitive advantage. I used my sales skills to tackle this problem. There were a few publications that developers would use to announce projects they were developing. They would do this with the hope of attracting people to lease their new building quickly.<br /> <br /> What I did was I hired a publicist and I instructed that publicist to go out and connect me with these developers. I wanted to know which buildings were being developed and which buildings would be ready quickly. At 2:30pm, one April afternoon, I remember it like it was yesterday, this is in 1999 now, I found out a developer was ready to lease up a building on the West Side of Manhattan. The building was due to open in July of that year. Once my publicist let me know that this developer was going to go out with a big campaign to announce this building, I went to his office that afternoon. I went with my check book and I wrote a hundred thousand dollar check as a deposit for the entire building. He cancelled the publication of the story, didn't have to do any marketing at all for his building. I was able to lease up the 80 apartments in that building and my sales team was outstanding.<br /> <br /> We filled it before the ink was even dry on that lease. Now, I used this strategy several times over the next two years and I dominated the market. We were able to obtain a 70% market share, 70% market share of the corporate housing business in New York City, in 1999, 2000 and early 2001. We were able to do that because I was better than my competitors, well, maybe I was better than my competitors. Was I smarter than my competitors? Yeah, maybe I was a little smarter than my competitors, but was I faster than my competitors, Dave Lorenzo clean 18:44
How To Use The Referral Multiplier https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/18/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-2/ Mon, 18 Jul 2016 13:00:02 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=234 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/18/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-2/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/18/60-second-sale-dave-lorenzo-episode-2/feed/ 0 Discover how to effectively use the referral multiplier to grow your business. This is the second episode of The 60 Second Sale Show. In case you missed episode one you can follow this link to listen: How To Build Valuable Relationships with Your Clients Hey there work place warriors, it's Dave Lorenzo and this is the 60 Second Sale Show, and today's show is about the referral multiplier. Today, I'm going to share with you the secrets of the referral multiplier. If you want to grow your business quickly, it doesn't matter if you are an entrepreneur, or you are a sales professional, or if you run a super big company the best way to grow your company fast is through referral. Think about it this way, if you had 50 clients, just 50 clients and you were able to convince each of them to give you one new referral four times a year, and you only closed 50% of those people who would be able to more than double, in fact, you'd be able to triple the size of your company in just 6-1/2 months. That's right, you'd be able to triple the size of your company by just having a closing ratio of about 50% of the people who are referred to you by the folks who know you, like you, and trust you the most your clients. Today, you are going to discover the secrets of the referral multiplier. This is one of the most powerful strategies you can implement. The referral multiplier was born out of necessity. There's the old expression necessity of the mother of invention, and the referral multiplier came about when I was sitting across from one of my best clients. In fact, my first client who was in the legal profession, my first attorney client was sitting across from me, and we were resigning. She was signing up for a second year of work with me. I was thrilled because she was the very first lawyer I had ever worked with, and we were having a discussion, and she said to me, "Dave, I can't tell you how happy I am. In the first seven months that we've worked together my business has doubled, and I was absolutely thrilled with the way I did it. I didn't have to do it in a way that made me feel like I was out selling vacuums door-to-door. I am beside myself with joy that we were able to grow, and work together for a year, and I'm happy to sign up for a second year." As she was signing the paperwork, I said to her, "Anna, thank you so much. I can't tell you how much it fills my bucket to hear you say that. It makes me feel like I'm on top of the world. I have to ask you one question. Why is it that since you are so happy with me you've never sent me to someone else? Why is it that you've never introduced me to someone with whom I can do business? You've never given me one referral in the entire year we've worked together?" At that point, she put the pen down, and she looked at me, tilted her head and said, "You know, I don't have a good answer to that question," and together we brainstormed, and what we came up with was the fact that number one, Anna didn't know that I wanted referrals. Sounds silly, right. She didn't know that I actually wanted her to introduce me to other people who were just like her good, high quality attorneys who are looking to grow their business. The second thing was she didn't know who could she refer me to. She didn't know to whom I would like to be introduced. She didn't have an idea in her mind. She didn't have a mental picture of who the right person was to connect me with, and then the third thing she discovered was she didn't know how to introduce me. She didn't know that I wanted referrals. She didn't know who to introduce me to, and she didn't know how I wanted to be connected with these people. That really got me thinking, and I developed a process that would help me attract more referrals from my best clients, and in turn, it will now help you attract more referrals from your best clients. Think about it this way. If you are currently out there spending 3, 4, 5, 6 hours a day knocking on doors, Discover how to effectively use the referral multiplier to grow your business.

This is the second episode of The 60 Second Sale Show. In case you missed episode one you can follow this link to listen: How To Build Valuable Relationships with Your Clients

Hey there work place warriors, it’s Dave Lorenzo and this is the 60 Second Sale Show, and today’s show is about the referral multiplier. Today, I’m going to share with you the secrets of the referral multiplier. If you want to grow your business quickly, it doesn’t matter if you are an entrepreneur, or you are a sales professional, or if you run a super big company the best way to grow your company fast is through referral. Think about it this way, if you had 50 clients, just 50 clients and you were able to convince each of them to give you one new referral four times a year, and you only closed 50% of those people who would be able to more than double, in fact, you’d be able to triple the size of your company in just 6-1/2 months.

That’s right, you’d be able to triple the size of your company by just having a closing ratio of about 50% of the people who are referred to you by the folks who know you, like you, and trust you the most your clients. Today, you are going to discover the secrets of the referral multiplier. This is one of the most powerful strategies you can implement. The referral multiplier was born out of necessity.

There’s the old expression necessity of the mother of invention, and the referral multiplier came about when I was sitting across from one of my best clients. In fact, my first client who was in the legal profession, my first attorney client was sitting across from me, and we were resigning. She was signing up for a second year of work with me. I was thrilled because she was the very first lawyer I had ever worked with, and we were having a discussion, and she said to me, “Dave, I can’t tell you how happy I am. In the first seven months that we’ve worked together my business has doubled, and I was absolutely thrilled with the way I did it. I didn’t have to do it in a way that made me feel like I was out selling vacuums door-to-door. I am beside myself with joy that we were able to grow, and work together for a year, and I’m happy to sign up for a second year.”

As she was signing the paperwork, I said to her, “Anna, thank you so much. I can’t tell you how much it fills my bucket to hear you say that. It makes me feel like I’m on top of the world. I have to ask you one question. Why is it that since you are so happy with me you’ve never sent me to someone else? Why is it that you’ve never introduced me to someone with whom I can do business? You’ve never given me one referral in the entire year we’ve worked together?”

At that point, she put the pen down, and she looked at me, tilted her head and said, “You know, I don’t have a good answer to that question,” and together we brainstormed, and what we came up with was the fact that number one, Anna didn’t know that I wanted referrals. Sounds silly, right. She didn’t know that I actually wanted her to introduce me to other people who were just like her good, high quality attorneys who are looking to grow their business.

The second thing was she didn’t know who could she refer me to. She didn’t know to whom I would like to be introduced. She didn’t have an idea in her mind. She didn’t have a mental picture of who the right person was to connect me with, and then the third thing she discovered was she didn’t know how to introduce me. She didn’t know that I wanted referrals. She didn’t know who to introduce me to, and she didn’t know how I wanted to be connected with these people.

That really got me thinking, and I developed a process that would help me attract more referrals from my best clients, and in turn, it will now help you attract more referrals from your best clients. Think about it this way. If you are currently out there spending 3, 4, 5, 6 hours a day knocking on doors, looking to meet people who can do business with you, and you’re doing this in high volume, and you have a closing rate that’s really good, maybe 30%, 40%, even 50%. Imagine if the groundwork has been laid ahead of you, and you connect with people who already think of you as an expert because you’ve been introduced by someone they’ve already placed their trust in. This is what a referral can do for you.

Without any further ado, I’m going to introduce you to the three step process you can use to attract more referrals in your business immediately. Now, I know what you are thinking. You are thinking to yourself, sure Dave. If I were that easy, if I could go out, and get all my clients to give me four referrals a year, and then I could close two of those four, life would be great. I know. I know but it’s easier said than done Dave. I’ve tried asking for referrals. People look with a deer and the headlights look. That’s what you are thinking. I know that.

I used to think that to. Here’s how we combat that. Step number one, starting up a referral conversation. Usually, I start a referral conversation by asking the other person how he finds his business. I just ask them point blank, tell me about your best client, and they tell me the story about their best client, and I say, how did that client come to you? How did you attract that client? After they tell that story, it’s natural, 90% of the time they’ll say, Dave, tell me how do you find your best clients? I say, well, you know what? I’m really glad you asked that. I find my best clients most often through referrals.

They look at me, and they go, really, and I say, yeah. Would you like to hear how I can attract more referrals in a day than most people attract in a month? They say, of course, I would like to hear that, and that leads me to step two, and step two is getting that person into a referral mindset. Now, the key is getting that person to shift from thinking about his clients to thinking about people he may know and he can introduce me to.

Our brains are just like computers. I want you to picture right now your brain looking just like the desktop on your computer. You have file folders on there, and when you click on the file folder it opens up, and it reveals inside, ta-da. Files. Your brain works just like that. You have to get the person with whom you are speaking to open up those mental files that reveal the people they know to whom they can make an introduction. The people they know they can introduce you to.

Here’s how we do it. The way to do that is to bypass all skepticism, to bypass the critical thinking section of the brain by telling a story. To get the other person into a referral mindset what I do is I say to them, well, Joe, let me ask you? Have you ever met anyone who is famous? You ever met anyone who you admire, and Joe will say, sure. I say, do you remember the story, the circumstances, the situation under which you met them, and sometimes they’ll look at me a little funny. They may not remember all the details of the situation in which they met the person. So I tell them a story of how I met someone famous.

The story that I always use in this situation is one of the moments that will standout in my life forever. In 1989, I was a bellman in a hotel, and I was in my senior year of college, and I’m standing in the front desk of this really busy hotel in New York. I’m looking across the lobby thinking about what I’m going to do after my shift that night. I see two people walking across the lobby. One is a beautiful, striking woman. A woman who looked like a model. She looked like an actress. She’s holding the arm of a taller, stalky man who’s kind of hunched over, shuffling his feet, and they are both pulling luggage.

My bellman money making instinct kicks in. I run over to them, and I notice as I get within four feet of them that it is Muhammad Ali, and his beautiful wife. I say to them, good evening. Welcome to … It was the Winchester Marriott. Good evening, welcome to the Winchester Marriott Hotel. My name is Dave, would you like some help with your luggage? Mrs. Ali, actually her name is Williams. It’s Yolanda Williams. She goes by Lonnie. She says, absolutely. Will you help us, and show us where we can check in.

I take them to the front desk. They check in. After checking they get into the elevator. We are riding up to the room, and I look and I say, champ. It’s an honor to meet you. You are my favorite boxer of all time, and Ali looks over at me. He gives me a little bit of a smile. At this point, it had been probably about seven years since he had revealed that he had Parkinson’s Disease, and he didn’t speak very much, and there were obvious signs that he was suffering from the disease.

We get to the room, and I put their luggage on the luggage stand. I offered to get them ice. I showed them how to work the air conditioning. When I come back, I set the bucket of ice on the table. I shake Mrs. Williams hand, and she gives me a very nice tip, and I look over at Muhammad Ali, and I say, champ. It has been an absolute honor to walk you up to your room. This has been the thrill of a laugh time. I said, last year I got to meet Mike Tyson, and I had a conversation with him, and he’s a great champion but you are far and away the best of the best.

At that point, I noticed Ali take his hand, and tap his wife on the side, and Mrs. Williams at me and said, before you go, would you mind telling us the story about how you met Mike Tyson? Would you share that with us? I said of course. Tyson was standing in the hotel, and he did not want to be in the public space. He didn’t want to be recognized by people so every time he would go to leave his room, one of us would have to escort him through the service area, through the employee area so he could get in and out of the hotel unnoticed.

I was selected to do this one time. I rode down with him in the service elevator, and we went through the kitchen. We had a Polynesian restaurant in the hotel, and we had brought the staff over from the Far East to cook in the kitchen, and I was walking with Tyson through the kitchen, and he said, I can’t believe none of these people in this kitchen recognize me. I thought that was kind of funny since he didn’t want to be recognized yet he was struck by the fact that nobody int he Polynesian kitchen recognized him because they didn’t know anyone. They had just come over from South East Asia.

At any rate, we exit the building, and I said before he got into his car, I said, champ. I just have one question for you. I’m a huge boxing fan. Tell me, when you were growing up, who did you admire? He said, hands down, easily Muhammad Ali. He was the greatest fighter of all time. I told the story, and that’s how I ended the story with Ali, and his wife, and as I said that Ali motioned to me to come closer to him. He took very halting steps forward, and with all the strength he could muster he got into a fighting stance, and in slow motion, the slowest of slow motion threw a left cross, which gently connected with my jaw, and he followed it up with a right upper cut that ended in giving me a huge hug.

That moment, in that moment I felt like was on top of the world. Why? Here I am, a bellman, a nobody, someone who most people wouldn’t even recognize when they pass them in the lobby yet this public figure who was arguably the most recognizable person on the planet made me feel like I was the most important person in the world in that moment.

That’s the story I tell. What I want to get people into a referral mindset. I finish the story, and I pause, and I say to them, you have to have a story somewhere along the line similar like that, similar to that where someone made you feel special. The person always has some sort of story just like that. They share it with me, and now, they are their mind is open to not only telling me about famous people they know but the can easily recall everyone they know if I give them the right clues.

That takes us into step three in the secrets of the referral multiplier, and that’s what I call the memory jogger. At that point, after you’ve got that final folder open in their mind, all you need to do is reach in, and pluck out the exact referral you want. You finish telling the story. They tell you their story, and you say, wow, that’s a great story. I love hearing about how people meet other famous people. A great referral for me would be someone who is the head of a large company, and focused on sales. Joe Smith the director of sales for XYZ Pharmaceutical Company. They have 130,000 sales people out there. That would be a great referral for me. Do you happen to know that person?

When I ask for a referral, I’m doing some specific things. I’m asking for the exact person I want to meet but I’m also giving the title of that person vice president, executive vice president of sales. I’m saying what company he works for, and I’m also saying what industry he’s in. You give the exact name, the title, the company, and the industry. Very, very important. Why? Because they may not know that exact person but they may know somebody who works in that company. I’d be happy to be connected with some senior in that company because I can ask them for an introduction.

They may not know the person, or the person in the company but they may know somebody in a competitor’s company. They may not the person or anyone in that company but they may know the exact person in different industry. What you’re doing is you are giving them different things that will trigger in their memory, that will jog in their memory an ideal person, an ideal referral for you. Those are the three steps in the referral multiplier.

Step one, getting to a referral conversation. Step two, get the other party into a referral mindset by telling a story, and then getting them to tell you a story about their introduction to a famous person, and then step three, use a memory jogger to ask specifically for the ideal referral for your business. Use this referral multiplier immediately. Go out and practice it today if you have to. Jump on the phone, and use it with a client immediately because everyday you wait to use the referral multiplier is a day you are not making money. This will make you money right now. Go out and use it immediately.

All right. It’s time for the mail bag segment of our show, and today, we have email, and the email comes from Mike who’s a sale executive in an electrical supply company. Mike’s question is a really powerful one. He says, how do I ask a corporate executive for referrals. Usually, they are highly competitive, and they don’t want to share me their competitive advantage with somebody else. How do I ask them to refer me to someone?

Mike, here’s what I’ll tell you. I get this question all the time, and I find in my business that people use me as competitive advantage and they don’t want to introduce me to their competitors. I totally get it. You have to respect that. You have to respect that in them. Here’s what we do. We use the referral multiplier that I just outlined but we use it to get an introduction to someone in a trade association who can book us as a speaking gig for example. If you attract your clients initially through speaking you can ask the person what trade associations they belong, and ask for an introduction to the person who’s the leader in the trade association.

If this person is not a member of a trade association, you can ask them what articles they read, what journals they subscribe to, what blogs they go to, and you can get an introduction to the editor there perhaps so that you can write articles, and post them in those journals or on those blogs. The key is to find out who these folks know, and figure out how you can make the best use of their contacts. Don’t necessarily think of it as immediate business. You can also think of it in a more strategic way that they can introduce you to people who will help you advance your business.

Mike, I’ll tell you. I get what you are saying. I understand completely, and you can ask for introductions to specific people trade associations, and people will be happy to do that. That won’t violate their competitive instincts. They’ll b e referring you to a trade association, or something that they view as a more collegial environment.

Folks, as we wrap up today show, I want to remind you that everything that we introduce on the show should be implemented immediately. The name of the show is 60 Seconds to the Sale, and our business is about speed. The faster you implement the things that we introduce, the faster you will make more money.

Our goal as always is to help you make a great living, and live a great life. Until next time, I’m Dave Lorenzo and we’ll see you here at 60 Second Sale.

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Discover how to effectively use the referral multiplier to grow your business. This is the second episode of The 60 Second Sale Show. In case you missed episode one you can follow this link to listen: How To Build Valuable Relationships with Your Clie... Discover how to effectively use the referral multiplier to grow your business.<br /> <br /> This is the second episode of The 60 Second Sale Show. In case you missed episode one you can follow this link to listen: How To Build Valuable Relationships with Your Clients<br /> <br /> Hey there work place warriors, it's Dave Lorenzo and this is the 60 Second Sale Show, and today's show is about the referral multiplier. Today, I'm going to share with you the secrets of the referral multiplier. If you want to grow your business quickly, it doesn't matter if you are an entrepreneur, or you are a sales professional, or if you run a super big company the best way to grow your company fast is through referral. Think about it this way, if you had 50 clients, just 50 clients and you were able to convince each of them to give you one new referral four times a year, and you only closed 50% of those people who would be able to more than double, in fact, you'd be able to triple the size of your company in just 6-1/2 months.<br /> <br /> That's right, you'd be able to triple the size of your company by just having a closing ratio of about 50% of the people who are referred to you by the folks who know you, like you, and trust you the most your clients. Today, you are going to discover the secrets of the referral multiplier. This is one of the most powerful strategies you can implement. The referral multiplier was born out of necessity.<br /> <br /> There's the old expression necessity of the mother of invention, and the referral multiplier came about when I was sitting across from one of my best clients. In fact, my first client who was in the legal profession, my first attorney client was sitting across from me, and we were resigning. She was signing up for a second year of work with me. I was thrilled because she was the very first lawyer I had ever worked with, and we were having a discussion, and she said to me, "Dave, I can't tell you how happy I am. In the first seven months that we've worked together my business has doubled, and I was absolutely thrilled with the way I did it. I didn't have to do it in a way that made me feel like I was out selling vacuums door-to-door. I am beside myself with joy that we were able to grow, and work together for a year, and I'm happy to sign up for a second year."<br /> <br /> As she was signing the paperwork, I said to her, "Anna, thank you so much. I can't tell you how much it fills my bucket to hear you say that. It makes me feel like I'm on top of the world. I have to ask you one question. Why is it that since you are so happy with me you've never sent me to someone else? Why is it that you've never introduced me to someone with whom I can do business? You've never given me one referral in the entire year we've worked together?"<br /> <br /> At that point, she put the pen down, and she looked at me, tilted her head and said, "You know, I don't have a good answer to that question," and together we brainstormed, and what we came up with was the fact that number one, Anna didn't know that I wanted referrals. Sounds silly, right. She didn't know that I actually wanted her to introduce me to other people who were just like her good, high quality attorneys who are looking to grow their business.<br /> <br /> The second thing was she didn't know who could she refer me to. She didn't know to whom I would like to be introduced. She didn't have an idea in her mind. She didn't have a mental picture of who the right person was to connect me with, and then the third thing she discovered was she didn't know how to introduce me. She didn't know that I wanted referrals. She didn't know who to introduce me to, and she didn't know how I wanted to be connected with these people.<br /> <br /> That really got me thinking, and I developed a process that would help me attract more referrals from my best clients, and in turn, it will now help you attract more referrals from your best clients. Think about it this way. Dave Lorenzo clean 18:15
How to Build Valuable Relationships With Your Clients https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/11/sixty-second-sale-show-episode-1/ Mon, 11 Jul 2016 14:50:49 +0000 http://109.199.107.59/~davelorenzo/?p=225 https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/11/sixty-second-sale-show-episode-1/#respond https://davelorenzo.com/2016/07/11/sixty-second-sale-show-episode-1/feed/ 0 How to Build Valuable Relationships With Your Clients Welcome to the 60 Second Sales Show. I am Dave Lorenzo, your host. I'm the guy who helps you make a great living and live a great life. Today we're here to help you create deep, lifelong relationships with your clients, in 60 seconds or less. Increasing sales requires you to create a sense of urgency among your clients. Creating a sense of urgency is not something that comes naturally. I want you, now, to picture a big fat guy sitting on a couch at home in the middle of a snowstorm. He's sitting there eating a bag of potato chips. He's got them and he's throwing them into his mouth, one after the other. Your job is to get that big fat guy off the couch, get him to run out the door into the snowstorm to buy the product that you're selling. We're going to show you how to do that right now, here, today, on the 60 Second Sales Show. The best way you can do that is to motivate the person to act in his or her own self-interests. Way back when, about ten years ago, when I was a partner at The Gallup Organization, my boss came to me. The CEO of the company walks into my office and he sits down in the chair and he says, "Dave, listen. I have something I want you to do and it's something that's really personal to me". I sat up, I leaned forward, and I was listening intently as he described to me a situation in which his brother in law, his ex brother in law, the guy who had just divorced his sister, had stolen one of his most prized accounts. The account was Ann Taylor stores. It was a clothing retailer. He described to me the pain he felt when his brother in law not only humiliated his sister by divorcing her, but also stole his account. He said to me, "I need you to do me this favor. I need you to drop what you're doing and go after this account as hard as you possibly can. I want you to land this account and if you do it in the next 60 days, I'm going to give you a $50,000 bonus". You know and I know that money is a huge motivator for successful sales people, so I sat up in my chair and I said, "Boss, you can count on me. I'm on the case". Keep in mind that this is a business, this is an industry, big ticket consulting, business to business consulting, which normally requires an 18-month to 2-year sales cycle. The minimum size account we would even bother to look at as a consulting organization is $1,000,000 in revenue to us on an annual basis. I just promised my boss I was going to do this in 60 days. I looked around the room, just me there, and I said to myself, "How am I going to make this happen?" I went into my contacts file and I looked for people who had been to my speaking engagements in the past. I noticed there was one person from this company, one person from Ann Taylor stores, who had been to a speaking engagement in the past. I picked up the phone and I reached out her and I said, "I noticed you had come to see me speak. I'm wondering what resonated with you from that presentation". She gave me a clue, she gave me an insight, as to how I could potentially help her. She said to me, "What really resonated with me is that you talked about how diversity in our management team could increase sales in our organization. This is something we desperately need". I said to her, "Wow". Her name was Allison. I said, "Allison, what's preventing you from making this happen?" She said, "I can't make the case. I can't make the case internally to my boss. I can't make the case to the CEO. The case is just too difficult". I said, at that point, "Allison, would you like some help with that?" She paused and she said, "Of course. I would love some help with that. What could you do to help me?" At that point, we were off to the races. I knew I had her. I knew I had created an opportunity, but I didn't know whether or not we had a sense of urgency developed. I met with her and we developed a plan to help them come up with a way to increase the diversity in their management tea... How to Build Valuable Relationships With Your Clients

Welcome to the 60 Second Sales Show.

I am Dave Lorenzo, your host. I’m the guy who helps you make a great living and live a great life. Today we’re here to help you create deep, lifelong relationships with your clients, in 60 seconds or less.

Increasing sales requires you to create a sense of urgency among your clients. Creating a sense of urgency is not something that comes naturally.

I want you, now, to picture a big fat guy sitting on a couch at home in the middle of a snowstorm. He’s sitting there eating a bag of potato chips. He’s got them and he’s throwing them into his mouth, one after the other. Your job is to get that big fat guy off the couch, get him to run out the door into the snowstorm to buy the product that you’re selling. We’re going to show you how to do that right now, here, today, on the 60 Second Sales Show. The best way you can do that is to motivate the person to act in his or her own self-interests.

Way back when, about ten years ago, when I was a partner at The Gallup Organization, my boss came to me. The CEO of the company walks into my office and he sits down in the chair and he says, “Dave, listen. I have something I want you to do and it’s something that’s really personal to me”. I sat up, I leaned forward, and I was listening intently as he described to me a situation in which his brother in law, his ex brother in law, the guy who had just divorced his sister, had stolen one of his most prized accounts. The account was Ann Taylor stores. It was a clothing retailer. He described to me the pain he felt when his brother in law not only humiliated his sister by divorcing her, but also stole his account. He said to me, “I need you to do me this favor. I need you to drop what you’re doing and go after this account as hard as you possibly can. I want you to land this account and if you do it in the next 60 days, I’m going to give you a $50,000 bonus”.

You know and I know that money is a huge motivator for successful sales people, so I sat up in my chair and I said, “Boss, you can count on me. I’m on the case”.

Keep in mind that this is a business, this is an industry, big ticket consulting, business to business consulting, which normally requires an 18-month to 2-year sales cycle. The minimum size account we would even bother to look at as a consulting organization is $1,000,000 in revenue to us on an annual basis. I just promised my boss I was going to do this in 60 days.

I looked around the room, just me there, and I said to myself, “How am I going to make this happen?” I went into my contacts file and I looked for people who had been to my speaking engagements in the past. I noticed there was one person from this company, one person from Ann Taylor stores, who had been to a speaking engagement in the past. I picked up the phone and I reached out her and I said, “I noticed you had come to see me speak. I’m wondering what resonated with you from that presentation”.

She gave me a clue, she gave me an insight, as to how I could potentially help her.

She said to me, “What really resonated with me is that you talked about how diversity in our management team could increase sales in our organization. This is something we desperately need”.

I said to her, “Wow”. Her name was Allison. I said, “Allison, what’s preventing you from making this happen?” She said, “I can’t make the case. I can’t make the case internally to my boss. I can’t make the case to the CEO. The case is just too difficult”. I said, at that point, “Allison, would you like some help with that?” She paused and she said, “Of course. I would love some help with that. What could you do to help me?”

At that point, we were off to the races. I knew I had her. I knew I had created an opportunity, but I didn’t know whether or not we had a sense of urgency developed. I met with her and we developed a plan to help them come up with a way to increase the diversity in their management team. We worked on this plan for about a week and a half. I helped her with the presentation. She rehearsed it over and over again. Within three weeks, she was ready to present it to the CEO. At that point, we did our final run through. I shook her hand and I said, “Allison, you’re ready to go”, and she got cold feet.

She got cold feet because she had never been on this size stage before. The appointment with the CEO was set, she was sure that she had a way to increase diversity in the company, but she didn’t know if she had the guts to go through with it.

I said to her, “Allison, you are the most qualified person in this company right now to deliver this message. The CEO needs this message, the company needs this message. You’re going to help them, and what I’m going to do is I’m going to be in the room as your statistician. If you ever fumble or stumble look fo